Permission to ask a naive question.

RedhillPhil

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Thankyou.
In lots of fishing videos wot I wotch the demonstrating angler is showing us how he clips the line to the little clip thingy on the reel's spool to cast to the same spot/distance every time.
(I always thought that it was just to keep the line tidy on an unused reel).
Now, what happens when a whopper takes the bait and wants to run off? Do you just hang on for grim death and hope that everything holds or..........or what?
 

alsur

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I've found that rarely happens, you normally hold rod above or behind your head when line hits clip so by the time you've tightened up slack there is a few yards of line on reel, that plus the stretch is nearly always enough. I've only had fish rush of a break me a couple of times and I've double figure carp on 6lb line when clipped up.
 

SpenBeck

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If you are fishing with the chance of 'catching a whopper', then clip-up using a rubber band.
When the rod rips round instead of the line snapping, the rubber band pops off the spool and off the fish goes!
If fishing in to open water do a turn count on the handle, so you can set up back to the same distance - after un-hooking your whopper!
 

Silver fan 82

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Use distance sticks. Alot more faffing around but if your likely to catch bigger fish then you won't get snapped off.
 

Arry

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As I use Mitchells (no such thing as a line clip when they were made) a lot I find cutting a section from an old inner tube and stretching it over the spool at the required distance works perfectly, and if you doo get a whopper line can still peel off the spool from under the bit of tubing....

This tip has been brought to you by Bodge it and Scarper Handy tips Inc :p :cool:
 

squimp

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I always use clips to cast with a leger/feeder set up and I always mark up my line and then UNclip before I sit down. That way when I hook a big fish I simply let line out as needed.

I use either fighting drag or Instant drag reels - so the chances of having a rod pulled in on the take is negligible.
 

Neil ofthe nene

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The chances of an exceptionally large fish need to be taken into account when using the line clip. In most circumstances I would say that the situation arising is fairly rare. As has been said, with the right gear and technique most fish of any size can be tamed. Though I admit there can be some seemingly squeeky bum moments. Trust your gear and you will be surprised what you can land without giving line. Though if necessary you do have a few seconds to take the line off the clip.

If you are fishing to a bank and clipping up so you land close to but not on the bank then whatever fish takes the bait can only swim left or right. This means you can immediately apply side strain and with the rod tip on or under the surface fish will tend to follow the pressure and kite round and eventually towards you.

In open water the same thing applies in that most often the fish will go left or right because of the pressure applied at a low angle. Fish will tend to succumb to pressure that is not trying to pull them to the surface.

If, though it really bothers you, then there are a few things you can do. The first is to put a rubber band or even a section of cycle tyre inner tube on the spool that will act like an easily removable line clip. A large fish will pull the band off the spool. The second is to tie a sliding knot on the main line with the feeder at the distance you want so that when you cast again you will hear the knot rattle through the rod rings. trap the line when you hear the rattle and you will land the feeder at a consistant distance without using the clip.
 

Ken the Pacman

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The ACS clips on some MAP reels release the line if a running fish reaches the clip or just use a folded pellet band under the clip and over the line which will snap if a running fish gets to the clip if you are on say 10lb line.
Count the turns of the reel handle so you know the distance then you should be able to get back to the same distance within a couple of casts if you lose the clip.
 

Marker50

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as said if clipping you have some spare if hitting clip with rod above you when you take slack up.
WITHOUT MOVING FEEDER.
If I hook a lump clipped up i put the rod tip deep under water most times that works for me.
 

Deejay8

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Am I right in thinking that when casting with the line clipped up, you release the line with the rod up in the air and leave it in that position until it hits the clip and you then let the end tackle hit the water and when it hits bottom, then lower the rod and tighten up?
 

mickthestick

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Also beware losing your Rod and Reel , you'd be surprised how often it happens , more so with pleasure anglers
 

G0zzer2

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It's not a naive question. Only a couple of weeks ago I hit a big fish when clipped up and before I could react it broke me. The farther away the fish is the less likely it is that a breakage will occur because of the extra stretch in the line. In my case my feeder was no more than 25 metres away.

The answer is that, as in all fishing, it's a compromise. Top matchmen may rarely need to clip up because their casting is so accurate. But us mortals often have to take a chance. I hate breaking; but it's the reason so may commercials insist that all feeders are fished in-line. One answer is to cast out, then unclip the line from the reel. If you don't get a bite, clip the line back before you reel in and re-cast. If you get a fish then OK, you have to check the distance again. But you may think it worth the extra hassle.
 

Nunachuk

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One other option maybe to have a few casts clipped up, (to get your eye in) and then mark your line with line marker paint, big fish takes your bait, no problem! Tight lines!
 

Rick123

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I will just tell you a quick tale someone told me about and I BELIEVE its true. This guy was losing feeders and leads, this chap could hear him cracking off, over again. When the chap came up to see him and ask a question. Apparently this chap had read about clipping up and casting to get accuracy. He was using 4lb line and 2 ounces leads, the result was obvious to all. :ROFLMAO:
 

Alantherose

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It's not a naive question. Only a couple of weeks ago I hit a big fish when clipped up and before I could react it broke me. The farther away the fish is the less likely it is that a breakage will occur because of the extra stretch in the line. In my case my feeder was no more than 25 metres away.

The answer is that, as in all fishing, it's a compromise. Top matchmen may rarely need to clip up because their casting is so accurate. But us mortals often have to take a chance. I hate breaking; but it's the reason so may commercials insist that all feeders are fished in-line. One answer is to cast out, then unclip the line from the reel. If you don't get a bite, clip the line back before you reel in and re-cast. If you get a fish then OK, you have to check the distance again. But you may think it worth the extra hassle.
Kind of... but that would mean progressively bringing your feeder nearer to you with each cast wouldn't it? You'd be re-clipping from the point where everything was tightened up.
 
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