Pellet presentation and hook penetration

OldTaff

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I generally tie my feeder hooklengths with a hair and a band for pellet or spike for soft baits

51979C72-2E1B-4092-A6D0-E8B64D95255A.jpeg

My hooks for float fishing get tied with no hair.

If I am float fishing and decide to switch to hard pellet as a bait then am I better off switching hooklength to one tied with a band or can I get away with hooking a banded pellet onto the bottom of the gape ?

B19944B4-68FA-46B9-BF8C-828781395845.jpeg

Would I be significantly decreasing my chances of the hook penetrating a lip and getting a good hold with the ‘lazy’ option or is it something done regularly by people?
 

Silver fan 82

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I generally tie my feeder hooklengths with a hair and a band for pellet or spike for soft baits

51979C72-2E1B-4092-A6D0-E8B64D95255A.jpeg

My hooks for float fishing get tied with no hair.

If I am float fishing and decide to switch to hard pellet as a bait then am I better off switching hooklength to one tied with a band or can I get away with hooking a banded pellet onto the bottom of the gape ?

B19944B4-68FA-46B9-BF8C-828781395845.jpeg

Would I be significantly decreasing my chances of the hook penetrating a lip and getting a good hold with the ‘lazy’ option or is it something done regularly by people?
Why could you not fish the hair rigged band on a float set up?
I usually use a hair rigged band like you do when feeder fishing with fairly good results in the past.
Personally not had much success float fishing with pellets but that's just me lol!
 

IanG1

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I definitely had more hook up problems with the band directly on the hook compared to a hair. I watched a Jamie Hughes YouTube video on how he ties a relatively short hair in a loop trapped by the shank whippings instead of a very small loop and a single hair if that makes sense and this has been successful for me. I don't do this kind of fishing often but had problems at the start until I adopted this way.
 

robert d

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I generally tie my feeder hooklengths with a hair and a band for pellet or spike for soft baits

51979C72-2E1B-4092-A6D0-E8B64D95255A.jpeg

My hooks for float fishing get tied with no hair.

If I am float fishing and decide to switch to hard pellet as a bait then am I better off switching hooklength to one tied with a band or can I get away with hooking a banded pellet onto the bottom of the gape ?

B19944B4-68FA-46B9-BF8C-828781395845.jpeg

Would I be significantly decreasing my chances of the hook penetrating a lip and getting a good hold with the ‘lazy’ option or is it something done regularly by people?
Best to pull the band all the way around to the shank just past the bend ,caught loads like that
 

The Landlord

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I rarely fish with banded pellet, don't know why. Maybe it's the lazy option as Taff said. However I was watching a Des Shipp Q&A the other week and he said he often hooks the band.
 

dave brittain 1

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Prior to hair rigs the popular way of hooking pellets was to use a 4mm wide silicone float rubber, trapping the shank of the hook against the pellet so that the hook point sat at 90 degrees. In those days we used to coat our hook pellets with superglue in an aerosol lid, tapping them out onto a bait box lid to dry so they didn't absorb water. You could often catch several fish on the same pellet.

When the hair rig came in people used to vary the length of the hair from almost touching the bend of the hook to 2cm long. Over the years numerous theories have been quoted however unless I'm fishing two cubes of meat or two pieces of corn my hair length is usually 2mm under the size of the pellet below the bend of the hook, i.e. 6mm pellet = band 4mm below the bend of the hook, 8mm pellet = band 6mm below the bend of the hook.

I've tried various permutations and go back to the above every time.

The latest trend is the new improved band in a loop, see:


Using this method you can put the band almost against the shank in a similar manner to what you can achieve with a band. It's neat and tidy however when using this yesterday I did lose a few fish shallow which simply came off the hook and I have a feeling that the pellet being so close to the shank may have been the reason why however I need to do a bit more experimenting with it.

Going back to the OP I use exactly the same hair rig for feeder and float work and have done for 20 yrs. I use a band for corn and meat although in some matches I simply remove the band and hook the corn or meat directly. I hate bait spikes and find it much simpler to simply use a baiting needle, threading it through the meat or corn, stretch the band and slide the bait over the band and then pull the band into the bait.

I'd never go back to banding the pellet as it's too fiddly and sometimes you used to bump/lose a few fish, something that rarely happened with a hair rig.
 

Freesolo82

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I don't pellet fish very often but looking at the bottom photo with the hook in the band I am thinking that the fish could take the bait and not hook itself quite a large percentage of the time, am I wrong?
 

Maesknoll

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Like this ?

D188621F-D149-445F-B5AB-B82FD2421DC6.jpeg
That hook is specifically designed to be used with a hair, nothing wrong with hooking a band ( although I always use a hair), if I was going to hook the band, either as you show or actually put the hook through the rubber of the band, then I’d be using a hook with a straight eye and point.
 

dave brittain 1

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Fish don't hook themselves unless you are using a bolt rig. Hair rigs aren't just for pellet you can hair rig any bait including maggot and caster

The theory of the hair rig is that when using a bolt rig, when the fish sucks in the bait the hook follows. However when the fish ejects the bait because the hook is following there's a good chance that the hook will prick the carps mouth and it will panic, tearing off, hooking itself against the weight of the lead.

Now this is where it differs when not employing a bolt rig. When float fishing the reality is that when the float goes under, the carp has turned with the bait in it's mouth, which gives the indication. The anglers then has to strike and set the hook. Having fished the hair rig for years, you still miss bites and the fish can reject the hair without the hook pricking it or the fish panicking, so the theory isn't as black and white as what some make out.

There have also been video's where fish on some of the most technical bolt rigs, fish have ejected a bait up to 10 times without setting an alarm or panicking and hooking itself so there's nothing set in concrete. Putting it simply it's an effective way of presenting a bait in all forms of angling.

Do you hit more bites or get more bites with a hair rig? It's a very good question as fishing the hair has become the norm for many match anglers fishing pellets and not many question it.

For me it offers an good clean effective way of hooking pellets, meat and corn and presenting the bait in the manner that I like, often allowing the use of a smaller hook which aids presentation without the risk of the bait obscuring the hook. It also gives a clean hook hold without bumping fish which is a common phenomenon when hooking baits conventionally. For me it's a big part of my commercial fishing, not to mention chub and barbel fishing on rivers where I'll use a hair rig for all of my meat and pellet fishing.

For conventional baits like maggot and caster I'll simply hook them directly. I don't think there's a better way of hooking hard baits such as pellet from 4mm though to 15mm than using a hair rig and bait band. It's a very efficient way to fish which is why so many use it.
 

Imperium

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Personally when I use banded pellet (not that often to be honest!) I actually hook the band as in pierce the hook through the rubber and position it between the shank and the bend of the hook, so its at a 45 degree angle - I find this best as it leaves the bait presentable whilst also leaving enough hook visible that hook-ups are frequent.

If I am on a river/after the barbel, I will drill the pellet and hair-rig it rather than use a band at all.
 

Anglingman

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I fish hard pellet on std waggler tackle often,
Personally I much prefer a band hair rigged in a loop.

I have pole fished and used the waggler just by hooking the band, it works but i find hair rigging gives me a bigger hook up ratio, especially for carp.

If its mainly F1's a hooked band works well
 

Arry

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I had this conversation with my mate at Docklow... the F1 bites on the Stock Pond were very finicky with the float burying, but no hook ups... I cut off the band and fitted a small pellet band to the hook with the pellet on the shank and topped up with 31 F1's for an afternoon's fishing, so yes I think its worth trying if bites are getting harder to hit with a conventional hair rig....
 
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