Open faced reel for trotting

Rod & Annette

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Aug 21, 2021
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I'm after a match reel for float fishing on Rivers. I need something with a short stem to be able to feather the line as I have quite short fingers.

I've used some Cadence CS10 which are great reels albeit a little long in the stem for my stubby digits.

I have a couple of basic Korum reels which are fine but now have a few dinks in the metal spool rim. I could use a bit of wet and dry to sort this as they are perfectly capable but I would rather have a new shiny toy. Also had the Greys GFS which I think is the same as the Drennan front drag reel. It was great when it worked but seized up after a couple of seasons.

I'm not fussed about what drag system as I'll be primarily using it for silver fish and backwinding.

I have been considering some of the older Shimano reels but not sure where to start as there so many models. Again with TDRs I'm not sure which models would be suitable.

Would like something fairly lightweight as it will be paired with a light Float rod.

All replies greatly appreciated.
 

nejohn

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I also have small hands and fairly short fingers so I get your problem, I found it is not just the length of the stem but also the position of the stem in relation to the spool rim. The best fit for me tends to be Daiwa reels as I find I am not stretching so much with them, the ones I tend to use are TDM's in 3012 size or Theory's in 3000 size both of these seem to fit my hand well. I struggled a little with some Shimano reels, even though there was not much difference in the length of the stem it seemed to sit further away from the spool rim than on similar Daiwa reels. Best thing to do is take the rod you intend to use to a shop and try a few
 

squimp

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As Nejohn says the TDM 3012 does have a shorter stem (or at least feels like it) than some other reels. I bought one 2 years ago and it is a good, solid (code for a bit heavy) reel.

I must have slightly longer fingers as I actually prefer fishing with my 25 year old Shimano Aero Match 3 reels. Usually available on eBay for £40+.
 

ravey

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Mar 3, 2011
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I have the same issue, and have always preferred to feather the line with my index finger. I found that the older Daiwa 2500iA and the slightly later 1503CU models fit the bill perfectly for me. No longer in production, you will have to rely on used samples from the usual sources. For some reason, they command high prices, although o believe that they were top of the range back in the day.
 

richox12

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I have the same issue, and have always preferred to feather the line with my index finger. I found that the older Daiwa 2500iA and the slightly later 1503CU models fit the bill perfectly for me. No longer in production, you will have to rely on used samples from the usual sources. For some reason, they command high prices, although o believe that they were top of the range back in the day.
I've got three of the 2503XiA models and they are brilliant for float work. Great line lay. And I have short fingers (most open face are a pain but closed face OK). Maybe it's a Daiwa thing
 

Rod & Annette

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Aug 21, 2021
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I do like the look of the older Team Daiwa models and the 1657m but that seems to be a bit of a marmite reel, what are the pros and cons of it?
 

michaels

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Mar 27, 2011
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I've only just discovered this posting, so apologies for the late response . Apparently I'm stuck in some kind a time warp, when it comes to shallow spools & match reels, as I'm still using the old school Shimano Aero Match range, especially the Super. They're are still going strong, and they haven't missed a beat.

53245768_10156838081450999_5374247729436295168_n.jpg
 

Reuben

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I do like the look of the older Team Daiwa models and the 1657m but that seems to be a bit of a marmite reel, what are the pros and cons of it?
1657DM - pros: great for those with small hands, auto bail arm, decent drag & excellent line lay due to the shape of the shallow spools.
Cons: lots of complaints re line twist due to line roller so many glued it.
It was my reel of choice for stick & waggler on running water back in my match fishing days after reading an article by Dave Harrell back in the 90s. The pros far outweighed the cons for me.
 

Doolittle

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Oct 4, 2020
Messages
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I'm after a match reel for float fishing on Rivers. I need something with a short stem to be able to feather the line as I have quite short fingers.

I've used some Cadence CS10 which are great reels albeit a little long in the stem for my stubby digits.

I have a couple of basic Korum reels which are fine but now have a few dinks in the metal spool rim. I could use a bit of wet and dry to sort this as they are perfectly capable but I would rather have a new shiny toy. Also had the Greys GFS which I think is the same as the Drennan front drag reel. It was great when it worked but seized up after a couple of seasons.

I'm not fussed about what drag system as I'll be primarily using it for silver fish and backwinding.

I have been considering some of the older Shimano reels but not sure where to start as there so many models. Again with TDRs I'm not sure which models would be suitable.

Would like something fairly lightweight as it will be paired with a light Float rod.

All replies greatly appreciated.
Tdr
 

Doolittle

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Oct 4, 2020
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Tdrs bit on the heavy side plus I find newer models twist line . Shimano Stradic ci4+ Light as a feather power and smooth no line twist.think the van ford is as good but not owned one.
 

Tinca Mad

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Daiwa Fuego LT 3000 for me. Smooth | 215g | 10kg Drag | Magsealed
The 2021 Model is available now & shallow spools (BLACK) can be had from Aliexpress:
 

Beck Hill

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Jan 16, 2019
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55
I've only just discovered this posting, so apologies for the late response . Apparently I'm stuck in some kind a time warp, when it comes to shallow spools & match reels, as I'm still using the old school Shimano Aero Match range, especially the Super. They're are still going strong, and they haven't missed a beat.

53245768_10156838081450999_5374247729436295168_n.jpg
My Aero is a positive antique with the slider under the rear drag to increase/decrease the drag, it's a lovely old reel and favoured for lead work due to its 7:1 retrieve rate. Personally, I cannot imagine using it for float fishing, for that style surely a closed face or centrepin is the tool. I hear lots of comments about the closed face being a pain due to line tangles back and front of the spool, these tangles can be avoided simply by replacing the chenille in the spool rims on a regular basis. E Bay sell 2 and 3mm chenille for fly tieing in long lengths, it's cheap and fitting it is easy. As to the centrepin that's another matter, perseverance is a must in getting to grips with them. In my book, both reels are far superior to using a fixed spool as the line is allowed to paid out smoothly without any bumps.
 

an angler

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Mar 19, 2022
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i have found a center pin reel is the best for trotting sticks down a river .when you use a fixed spool you have to keep mending the line .or pull line off with your hand .that then gives you loops of loose line between all the eyes on the rod plus between the reel and first eye .in effect you are waggler fishing with a stick you can hold back but thats it.. on a center pin reel the line pulls off the drum keeping the line tight or slight finger pressure if needed does the same keeping the line tight to the stick. so you can ease a float through the swim or stop it .as for reeling in you sweep the rod back and spin the reel it takes less time than a fixed reel. as for casting as the rod moves out with the cast you pull down on the line the spool spins the float shoots out you touch the drum and it stops where you want it to ,,,practice the cast and you will a enjoy fishing sticks more and fast biting fish like roach and dace will become more hitable..its worth a go and you will see a big difference.
 

adam11

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May 11, 2011
Messages
72
Tdrs bit on the heavy side plus I find newer models twist line . Shimano Stradic ci4+ Light as a feather power and smooth no line twist.think the van ford is as good but not owned one.
the Vanford's don't have an anti reverse to facilitate backwinding.
 
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