One Float Rod To Rule Them All

DontKillZander

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As I've began offload my expensive Japanese lure tackle - it's opened up scope to start looking at my next setup without feeling too guilty.

I've just got my Barbel and Pike setups done, pretty much on the cheap -
x2 Shimano ST Baitrunners 6000RB, to sit on both -
x2 Daiwa Black Widow 12ft 1.75lb Twin Tips
x2 Daiwa Black Widow 12ft 3lb Deadbaits

Very happy with that, and feels good to not have to think about walking around sketchy Manchester canals anymore with £1000 in 300grams of tackle perched on my index finger, it was fun but definitely a phase.

The reason I'm an angler is through my dad, not from when he dragged me around the country blasting Oasis out of a mk4 Escort stuffed to the max with carp coughcampingcough gear, it never caught on for me... but on the occasions when he'd drive me to the local ponds to catch fish on a float rod, magical
... to add to that, we're not really spoilt for Barbel in the North West, but the coarse float fishing is superb, be it flowing, natural, or commercial, I've realised that to be able to really fill up the seasons with reliably satisfying fishing I'm going to have to get a float set up and the region is made for it.


So from river chub chasing, canal perch bashing, to commercial carp waggling - and everything in between, which float rod can I not go wrong with?

The Drennan Acolytes are looking very nice, but which one? Not sure what stands out as an all-rounder here.
The Daiwa Tournament Pro Match 13'/15' is VERY nice to look at and I'm sure is stuffed with fish playing technology, but it's going back down the expensive route which I'd prefer to avoid, go down the used route and get this?
The Shimano Beastmaster CX 9'/11' Multi Float looks like it's trying to do a lot, and I'd probably be thankful for it on tight river swims, anybody know about this rod?

Looks like the idea of multi length rods are appealing to me, know any more of these? And are there typically any inherent downsides?

Cheers,
Brad
 

Silverfisher

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Yeah no such thing as a true allrounder but you get some that’ll do more than others. I have 3 float rods in my armoury so to speak. An drennan acolyte ultra for natural and at least fairly natural venues for silver fish, a cadence CR10 #1 for commercials for silverfish (it’ll handle bigger fish better than the acolyte) and a daiwa ninja which I bought for a catch everything option for my little boat but is much more at home on commercial carp.

If you want to try a do quite a lot with one rod I’d look at the aforementioned cadence along with the shimano Aero X5 and the maver signature pro. These are proper float rods but are suited to both small and medium sized fish. I personally think the likes of the drennan acolyte ultra and ultralight matchpro, the garbolino ultralight and the browning sphere are better rods but they are more specialists tools designed for traditional float fishing for small species although that’s not to say you can’t land bigger fish on them.

As for multi lengths rods I’d steer clear as in my experience they fish much better at one length than the other anyway so you aren’t really gaining anything. A 13ft rod is a good do everything length, you’ll find that’s only occasionally too short or too long.
 

nejohn

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If I had to choose just one rod to cover all types of float fishing it would be one of the following 4
Normark titan 2000
Maver Nanolith medium action
Rive R waggler medium action
Maver signature pro
With possibly the addition of a Daiwa tournament RS
All in 13' lengths (a good compromise length)
None of them could be classed as the best rod for stick float, light waggler, pellet waggler etc but and it is a very big but is they are still pretty good at everything you ask them to do
Would I use my titan (or the others) for running a stick float through a fast moving river if I had my daiwa conny spliced tip with me.... No..... But if I didn’t have the conny with me would the titan do a good job... Yes
And the same goes for any other type of float fishing there might be better rods for that particular type of fishing but they wouldn't be great at other types of float fishing
Unfortunately only 2 are still in production and the Rive is like rocking horse poo but the signature pro is readily available.
Another to add would be a carbotec no 2 but again like rocky horse poo and very expensive (usually £300+ second hand)
None of the rods come cheaply and it might be more cost effective to buy more than one rod, but if you do a lot of stick float fishing bear in mind a top class stick float rod even second hand will be £100+
 

Fugley-fisher

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I would second the cadence 13 #1 Or 2 and a 11ft #1or two for smaller rivers both rods would be about 250 ish I use both the 13 #2 And 11#2, if you think your going to encounter bigger chub poss carp go for the 13#3 should be plenty of power, but less good for small silvers.
 

Silverfisher

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I think basically to condense my previous thread if you end up selling enough lure gear to have best part of £400 to spend then an acolyte ultra and a plus both in 13ft would cover just about everything you need. That’s a lot of money though so if you wanted to try do it with one rod for less than half of that I’d go with a 13ft signature pro.

If you could push up the budget somewhere between the 2 above scenarios you could get a couple cadences, say a 13ft #1 and an 11ft # 2 that would cover most things or an acolyte ultra for the proper stuff and then some cheap rod like a ninja for the carp as it doesn’t need to be techy for that.
 

DontKillZander

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Some great pointers of direction to research from the above, thank you.

All things considered, I must say - the Beastmaster 9ft/11ft is looking very hard to beat at the moment, from my research and how I envision I'll be using the rod.

There has to be an inherent downside to the action of a multi length rod, granted - but if I trust any company to put money into innovative R&D then it's Shimano.
It won't be a joyride for silvers, I accept that it will probably never see anything less than 4lb line but it's marketed as a smooth progressive action, and my last "stick-a-reel-on-and-cast-it-into-water-for-anything-that-swims" was a big thick John Wilson Barbel Travel, so it will be an improvement nonetheless.

On the other hand, it seems that it will do a splendid job of -
Being at 11ft targeting everything on Partridge Lakes besides the 20lb+'ers
Being at 9ft targeting big Perch and Chub on worms and prawns in the margins of canals and small rivers respectively.
Being at either length on the abundance of natural waters on my WAA card targeting... fish, finally putting that membership fee to use, I might even find an excuse to use my key!

As I'm trying to get out of £200+ single pieces of tackle, I think brand new at £120 is a good mid-range Shimano quality sweet spot to be in.
I'll put a rear/fightin' drag Stradic on it, probably 2500 size, either the GTM RC or the Ci4+ RA (definitely the GTM RC ;) pwahh) and I reckon I'll be happy with that.
 

rd115

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If you did fancy splashing the cash again i think you'd be the envy of a lot of people with a Browning Sphere spliced tip (y)
 

Silverfisher

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If your hearts set on a dual length rod I’d look at a korum glide over the beastmaster. Like the beatmaster it will be a bit harsh on small fish but it does have closer to a proper float rods action than it and does have much more practical lengths whereas combined with its action the beastmasters length would make it a struggle to use on all but the smallest rivers.

Would still go with a proper one length rod myself but if you want two lengths the glide does feel the better and more versatile rod.
 

nejohn

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Personally like others I feel the beast master is a bit of a one trick pony to have as your only float rod, in it's 11' guise it will be useful on commercials in shallowish water at relatively short range, take it to a natural or a river and it will really struggle, in it's 9' length its uses will be very limited, as said above if you have your heart set on a dual length rod then the glide would give you more options. Personally I am not a big fan of dual length rods unless you get another short butt section that fits directly into the second section, once you put a parallel extension in the action is completely ruined. I have the JW Youngs trotter in the travel version it is an 11'/13' rod at 11' it is quite a nice light actioned rod, well balanced and quite light, put the extension in and it is appalling completely changes the action and the balance of the rod, it is so bad that I don't bother taking the extension with me when I take the rod on holidays in fact I don't even know where the extension is I might even have binned it.
If you are looking for a float rod to fish small commercial fisheries only then the beast master maybe a good choice but if as in your original post you want something to cover a much wider range of venues then I would seriously think twice about it, you will only end up buying another rod
 

Silverfisher

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My experience of dual length rods is a greys 13/15 float which is functional at 13ft but pretty unwieldy and heavy at 15ft, a shimano exage 8/9ft spinning rod which is genuinely good at 9ft but somehow just not right at 8ft which is annoying as it would be a more practical length, an 8-10ft to gear compact allrounder which is good a feeder rod and functional Avon at 10ft but feels more like a spinning rod at 8ft and an 9/11ft daiwa bass rod which tbf actually does work at both lengths but does feel like two completely different styles of rod rather than trying to still be the same style. Basically when you change the length with the removing of a proper section they aren’t so bad but when it’s done by removing a section and adding a shorter one or just adding an extension it just doesnt work at all.

I think you can get away with dual length rods for feeder fishing but it’s not worth it for other more technical rods like float rods as they’ll only actually fish well at one length. Basically for me you can’t half a*rse float rods instead you’ve got to go a fair way up beyond the ton mark to get a proper one and there’s not much point trying to push them into a role they aren’t designed for.
 
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Sam Vimes

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I've seen four different ways of achieving a dual/multi length rod. The least satisfactory is a three piece rod with a separate dolly piece to extend it. In float rods, these are most commonly 13/15' rods. A fairly standard 13' float rod with an extension piece to take it to 15'.

Another way is to have different length butt sections. I've never had a multi-length rod done this way, but there have been some well regarded rods that used this method.

The next is similar to the above but with a less expensive twist. This uses a single butt section that is just a handle. It then uses variable length full sections that slot into the handle directly. Shimano have frequently used this method on its multi-length "commercial" rods (Beastmaster/Speedmaster Commericial ranges).

The final way is to take a 15 or 17' rod with a section you remove to make the rod shorter. I suspect that an awful lot of folks will think "what's the difference between this and the dolly extension". Well, in my experience, a 15' rod with a section to remove to make it 13' is far better than a 13' rod that you extend to 15'.

However, pretty much any way of producing a multi length rod is a compromise over a fixed length rod of the requisite length. I own rods that use each system other than the multiple butt section method. I'll actually use rods that fit the last two methods but not the first way. I'd much rather use a fixed length rod.
 

DontKillZander

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Now taking another look at the Acolyte Plus 13ft.
One thing I'm sure of is that I'd much rather be overgunned for silvers than undergunned for doubles.

That Beastmaster feels so right on paper :oops:
 

trotter2

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If you go down the accolyte root the plus is a better all-rounder. But it's definitely not a power float more of a standard float rod action but very light in weight and extremely well balanced.
 

Silverfisher

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Now taking another look at the Acolyte Plus 13ft.
One thing I'm sure of is that I'd much rather be overgunned for silvers than undergunned for doubles.

That Beastmaster feels so right on paper :oops:

You shouldn’t be too over gunned for silvers or too under gunned for doubles with the plus. Doesn’t feel absolutely perfect for either but then there’s no such thing but I think it would be a good compromise to cover both.
 

trotter2

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You shouldn’t be too over gunned for silvers or too under gunned for doubles with the plus. Doesn’t feel absolutely perfect for either but then there’s no such thing but I think it would be a good compromise to cover both.
I agree definitely the best compromise great all rounder it's not a poker and will still give you a bit of fun with the Roach,Rudd Skimmers.
 

nejohn

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If you are looking at spending almost £200 on the acolyte, I would seriously look at other options also as although they are a popular rod the action doesn't suit everyone (me included) so it is a big chunk of cash to spend without comparing it with other offerings.
The maver signature Pro is every bit as good as an acolyte and might actually be a better all rounder, I would also take a look at the garbolino essential and the tri-cast excellence all very good rods and current models. The daiwa Conniesuer might be a bit of a wild card, a little heavier than an acolyte but a very good all round float rod and can be bought for a lump less cash than the others. Not saying don't buy an acolyte if it suits you but there are other options that might suit better once you get your hands on them as after all we don't all like the same things in a rod. It is not so bad buying blind on other people's recommendations if you are spending £50 but maybe not such a good idea if you are spending £200
 

Silverfisher

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I’d say the signature pro sits between the acolyte ultra and plus for power and action. It doesn’t feel as if it would be as good a silvers rod as the ultra or as good a bigger fish rod as the plus but is a good mix of both in that I’m sure it would do carp better than than ultra and pretty sure it would do silvers better than the plus. I would suggest the signature pro over both acolytes as an allrounder but both acolytes are better specialist tools for me in terms of the ultra for silvers and the plus for say chub/tench/match carp.
 

DontKillZander

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If you are looking at spending almost £200 on the acolyte, I would seriously look at other options also as although they are a popular rod the action doesn't suit everyone (me included) so it is a big chunk of cash to spend without comparing it with other offerings.
The maver signature Pro is every bit as good as an acolyte and might actually be a better all rounder, I would also take a look at the garbolino essential and the tri-cast excellence all very good rods and current models. The daiwa Conniesuer might be a bit of a wild card, a little heavier than an acolyte but a very good all round float rod and can be bought for a lump less cash than the others. Not saying don't buy an acolyte if it suits you but there are other options that might suit better once you get your hands on them as after all we don't all like the same things in a rod. It is not so bad buying blind on other people's recommendations if you are spending £50 but maybe not such a good idea if you are spending £200

I've just been looking at the Daiwa Connoisseur, looks a solid master of sod-all which is indeed what I'm after, then I stumbled upon the Maver MV-R 3 Float, a rod they're proactively marketing as a "True All-rounder" master of nothing....


A true all-rounder. Perfect for any float fishing situation whether running water or commercial lakes.

Lengths Available

13ft

Casting Weight
20g-30g

Line Rating
3lb-8lb

Weight
168g



This is tougher than I expected.
I will buy one off research and recommendation regardless of the price - I always do and just live with the decision, I'm not a brick & mortar customer in the slightest, I find that they've never got what you want because there's always 2 alternatives and you end up leaving with one that you'll regret all the same.
 
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