Mullet Tips

spanky

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If all goes to plan in the coming months I hope to be by the seaside and last time we were there I watched a group of estuary mullet milling around. So this year I plan to take my telescopic rod and a few bit of tackle with me an have a pop at them.

From the reading I've done, it suggests that float fished bread, or surface bread may be the best way forward on medium tackle, but I'm open for ideas here as to other approaches or bait ideas. Please bear in mind I will have no access to fresh bait (so maggots are right out) and it will be minimal tackle at best (1 rod, 1 reel and a few bits of tackle).

So, expert mulleters, any thoughts?

Cheers
 

rudd

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My initial thoughts are good luck!
See loads of mullet every year in the Orwell (record came from orwell at some point) and Deben and they are a sod to catch.
Bread tends to be favoured bait fished as punch or flake on the drop, floating can work but is very very hard, in Med and Canaries have seen them taking corn and pellets.
The pellets looked like skettering micros and a micro bag of them cost a Euro.
Have heard harbour/ silver rag can work - if not schooly bass will have it - maybe worth getting a pack of artificial rag worm.

 

Zerkalo

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Mullet are the only sea fish I've caught. Was in a marina in the Canary Islands somewhere with a toy rod and Bread Flake. Heard they are notoriously difficult to actually hook but we did manage one or two.
 

brian carragher

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Mullet feed on the walls and piers and legs or any structure that holds weed or growth so if youre fishing somewhere were theres loads of weed then thats where your hook needs to be

I fish with an avon float with the bulk shot low down about 18 inchs off the hook, bread roughly pulled from a slice and pressed on the hoook shank does the business for me

Groundbait is bread mash and I'll have a couple of mix's, one is just slop and the other is proper mash, nice and rough but just wet enough to break down and sink, mullet are very confident swimming deep amongst the weed and you'll know the mullet are about when your float dances and dips, plenty of liners before they feed confidently, keep the mash going in as it might take a couple of hours before they switch on

You'll get plenty of sailaway bites where the float gets buried and you'll wonder how the hell you missed it but you will, you miss more than you connect with and you'll be scratching your head wondering why but when you do connect............................ bingo, its game on
 

JayD

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We used to visit my wifes relatives in Irvine, Scotland. They had a regular run of mullet up the river during the summer, and I spent many an hour trying to catch the bloody things, both from the river, and from the quayside. In the 10 or so years I tried, I only hooked a dozen or so fish, and only landed a hand full. I float fished, using mostly bread on the hook, and a little mashed bread thrown in to attract. Sometimes I would dig a few harbour ragworm. or even use a lobworm in the brackish water. They can be the most frustrating fish, taking a bait off the hook, and with small soft mouths hard to hook, and I had plenty of hook pulls, but they fight like hell, IMO much more than barbel or carp.
The best catch I saw, was by on a fly rod. The local club had fly fishing matches, on the river. One enterprising young chap fished the lower stretch and had 20 odd lb of mullet. There was a big argument, but he pointed out that the rules didn't specify 'trout only', so he got paid out. The rules were changed at the next meeting!

John.
 

Chitterlings & Hodge

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When I've fished for Mullet down here in the far South West I have always found it beneficial to get the shoal feeding first, whether that be by pre-baiting or carefully ground baiting. I've not had very good results by just fishing into the shoal or targeting individuals I try and get them into a feeding frenzy first.

As for tackle I use a a match rod, 8lb line, a clear bubble float (the type that has a plug so it can be made buoyant with water) and a size 14 hook. Bait is usually bread or Mackerel with some blended up for ground bait. It can be really frustrating with the amount of near misses, so you will need plenty of patience but it is great fun.

Good luck.
 

Silverfisher

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From my experience of trying to catch mullet I’d say target the other fish that are no doubt there as mullet are the hardest to hook fish I’ve ever come across!
 

Tinca Steve

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I used to catch them on micro crabs when l had my boat in the gut behind the station at canvey island other side of the road from the yacht club. Had the odd one on bacon rind as well but mostly on bread, and there right buggers.
 

Robwooly

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Mullet can sometimes be wonderfully easy to catch and frustratingly hard on more pressured areas, they are an amazing fish, I've had them wolf down golf ball sized bits of bread yet other times I've had to go down to a small bit of punch just to get a take from the fish that were 'drinking' the bread. Thick lipped and Golden Greys go for bread a lot and Thin Lipped prefer a small bit of rag attached to a spinner, as it's hard to tell Thicks from Thins I always opt for the bread approach, nothing fancy just a bucket of sloppy bread, fed little and often and that should draw fish in, and when they show there's not much more exciting moments in fishing as you'll often see the fish first.

Bread can often draw in bass too in certain areas so don't be shocked when you hear huge slurps off the top, both fish go like stink although with mullet you will get the odd fish that just doesn't want to go in your landing net, this can be quite comical, last year I found myself almost lifting out a 1lb fish just to get the damn thing in the net - I was on 6lb line.

Here's a blog post from last year that should inspire, ps I'm no expert and still learning

Mud, Mullet & Mr President

If you do hook a good mullet it can be quite explosive, so buckle up and prepare for the ride

P1020032.JPG
 

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mickthechippy

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most of the Mullets anglers locally use a bread bag as an attractant, an old mesh thing full of crumbed bread tied to a rope and given a shake every now and then

avon style rods and a decent big float with bread or harbour rag as bait

one of the baits not mentioned which also works well if you have seafood stalls along the harbour walls is winkles, bits of cockle, etc that people throw into the harbour
 

JayD

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most of the Mullets anglers locally use a bread bag as an attractant, an old mesh thing full of crumbed bread tied to a rope and given a shake every now and then

avon style rods and a decent big float with bread or harbour rag as bait

one of the baits not mentioned which also works well if you have seafood stalls along the harbour walls is winkles, bits of cockle, etc that people throw into the harbour
If you follow Micks advice and use a mesh bag full of mashed bread, don't make the mistake a club mate made.
He had the 'brilliant' idea of mixing a load of groundbait, (this was on the river Swale), fill a mesh bag, drop it in, and leave it to do it's business and attract the chub. He filled the bag, and threw it in, only to see it float away down the swim and disappear. Looking down he saw the stones that should have weighted it down, and the loose piece of rope that he'd tied too slack.
I reckon it must have passed Myton nab before it had emptied.

John.
 

spanky

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Thanks for the suggestions folks - it's very much a beach based setting, casting into a backwater (rather than a harbour), but I shall bear your comments in mind and see what I can manage with mashed bread with some seafood baits as well. Cheers.
 

mickthechippy

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Inspired by this thread

Himself and I took ourselves off down the harbour this after and threw a few mepps and ABU krills around hoping for a mullet

Sadly though, no success, not a touch, still it was a nice, if a bit chilly, couple of hours
 

MarkW

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If all goes to plan in the coming months I hope to be by the seaside and last time we were there I watched a group of estuary mullet milling around. So this year I plan to take my telescopic rod and a few bit of tackle with me an have a pop at them.

From the reading I've done, it suggests that float fished bread, or surface bread may be the best way forward on medium tackle, but I'm open for ideas here as to other approaches or bait ideas. Please bear in mind I will have no access to fresh bait (so maggots are right out) and it will be minimal tackle at best (1 rod, 1 reel and a few bits of tackle).

So, expert mulleters, any thoughts?

Cheers
Which estuary are you planning to fish? I've never had problems catching mullet on bread provided I've fed them with groundbait or bread mash.
 

spanky

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Which estuary are you planning to fish? I've never had problems catching mullet on bread provided I've fed them with groundbait or bread mash.
It'll be the Mawddach estuary, fished from the Fairbourne side. I've seen the fish come round the sand spit into the shallow water in the slack channels... just fancy a dabble with light kit to see if I can tempt one.
 

Silverfisher

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Slightly off topic but did anyone else know that mullet spent a fair bit of time offshore? I certainly didn't til I saw one swimming around in about 60ft of water a few miles off the Isle of Wight but the boat's skipper said he'd seen a few do it.
 

brian carragher

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Bass Mullet and pollock all do the same, inside during the summer and move into deeper water as the winter draws on
 
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