Middle Thames - Kelmscott

adriang

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Nov 5, 2018
Messages
567
Fished Sunday 8th Nov, after a few colder days, Sat and Sunday was frost free, temp got to 15 degrees at one point during the day.

3 of us fished Kelmscott, which is the upper/middle Thames, this is on the South Cerney AC ticket. Allegedly I've fished it before, although I can't remember it at all.

I tend to pleasure fish as if I'm fishing a match, so set up everything first, where as the other 2 were mobile, with made up feeder rods, meaning it took me longer to set up, hampered by the first outing of a new (to me) rive box, which needed some getting used to.

But the time I started one mate had caught 2 small chub on feeder fished maggots.

Swim I chose was on a bend, with quite a back eddy just downstream, noticeable crease and quite boily flow, which seemed to be chopping and changing continually.

Set up 2 rods, a feeder using my trusty Traverse X, medium feeder rod coupled with a Shimano 2500 reel loaded with 3lb Maxima. I stared on a size 10 hook to fish bread flake. Other rod was a 4.5m float rod (Maver MV-R Light, second outing and I'm really liking it), coupled with an Abu 506m loaded with Jaxon .10 and a DH 7 nbr 4 alloy stemmed stick float, and a Maver katana 20 hook.

Fished for about 45 mins using flake on the hook and liquidised break in the feeder, had one bite second cast, but missed it (by a mile). Alternated casts between the eddy downstream and the far bank. All the time I was feeding maggots and a little hemp about 1/3rd across.

After 45 mins, tried the stick, spent a bit of time playing with depth, managed to snag a dace, roach and a bleak, went back on the feeder, but this time blockend and maggots on a 18 hook, only a few bites, but nothing landed.

Kept on feeding the stick line, and after about 45 mins, went back on the stick, and managed to snag a chub of about 2lb, and then started to nick a few roach and dace, building up momentum to pretty well one a chuck (I had 20 in 20 casts at one point). By this time shotting was pretty well a bulk about 2/3rds depth and then a few shot underneath, I also shortened my hooklength as I was getting damaged bait without seeing positive bites and I prefer to not put any shot on a hooklength.

Lost my hook in a snag, put on a new one, fluffed the cast, and tangled and it was unrecoverable. Heavens opened, but with fish in front of me, I decided to carry on. Back to the car for my coat, and then it was umbrella up, and put away the feeder rod, and then reset up another stick (I have them on winders), while still feeding the swim.

The one thing I didn't do, was count off the depth against the rod rings, once I had depth sorted, I was back into the fish, not as consistently, but did get 4 or 5 larger dace, another chub about 12 oz and a few better roach including a few netters.

Once the rain stopped, decided it was time to stop. Reckon I fished for about 4 hours in total, and had a great day despite being wet through, and most of my gear soaked (rod holdall in currently in the bath while drying out).

Improvements:
Yesterday was definitely the last outing of my 25 year old Leon Grant coat, its served me well, but the zipper is done and it's no longer water proof.
506m needs looking at, it's got an annoying squeak, I think from the handle.
I'm still all over the place with my bait catapulting skills, need to get more accurate.
I didn't have a pole with me, if I had, I think I would have caught more quickly, although I love fishing the stick.

The final catch, not a bad days fishing.
IMG_6081.jpeg

View of my peg.
IMG_6078.jpeg

View downstream, one of my mates was fishing in the swim where my (wifes) car is parked up.
IMG_6080.jpeg
 

Silverfisher

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 10, 2019
Messages
9,882
Had to remind myself where that was I’d definitely call that upper Thames!

Very well fished indeed mate, it’s been rock hard outside of the towns since the frosts by all accounts so I’d say you’ve done very well ??

I’m out tomorrow but not a clue where to go or how to fish as last nights and this mornings rain will have no doubt stopped the river dropping as it was starting to do ?
 

Jimpanzee

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
316
Great little write up, and a very nice haul too. This isn’t too far from me, so I’ll probably try a visit next summer. When float fishing, do you go with a heavy float to try and keep it as static as possible?
 

Silverfisher

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 10, 2019
Messages
9,882
Great little write up, and a very nice haul too. This isn’t too far from me, so I’ll probably try a visit next summer. When float fishing, do you go with a heavy float to try and keep it as static as possible?
In the first half of the season the Thames is very steady flow wise so you can more or less just let it go at the flows pace with just the occasional bit of holding back so you don't need a very heavy float from that point of view. However whilst you don't need a particularly heavy float for hemp and bread fishing a bigger one is useful for maggot and caster as you need a fair bulk to get down through the bleak.

Second half of the season the bleak aren't a problem so you really do just tailor your float to the flow. The surface will be going quicker than the bottom so it's just a case of figuring out the pace it needs to be going through to match the loose feed. That is much easier to do when it's steady in the first half of the season than when it tends to be really pushing second half of the season especially as the fish are not as keen on chasing bait about in cold water as they are in warmer water!
 

adriang

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Nov 5, 2018
Messages
567
Great little write up, and a very nice haul too. This isn’t too far from me, so I’ll probably try a visit next summer. When float fishing, do you go with a heavy float to try and keep it as static as possible?
I've been fishing with floats that are a little heavier that usual this season, and to be honest it doesn't seem to have been a bad thing.

Something that is possibly a result of lockdown and watching a lot of YouTube, is that I have really started thinking a lot more about my fishing.

For example, if I fished a heavier float, does that give me more control with where I want to fish it, keeping it on the line I want, and holding back where needed.

This is the situation on my previous outing up at Inglesham (I'd call this upper Thames!), where I was literally far banking a heavy stickfloat, and holding it back to catch roach. I could not control a waggler with the flow in the middle and weed still on the bottom, but previously would have stuck it out because 'thats the normal thing' and probably had a rubbish day as a result.

I had in my mind that for this season, I was going to experiment with heavier floats, and even in the summer when the river is hardly flowing, and I have had some great days on hemp and tares, sometimes with bulked shot rather than the textbook 'shirt button light shot'.

I bought a couple of complete sets of the DH sticks, the idea being to give me coverage for most eventuality. They are big, some of them are on 26cm winders, and are heavier than I've previously used, taking a lot of shot.

I am still very much a light lines, small hooks angler and I've no reason to change.
 

Jimpanzee

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
316
In the first half of the season the Thames is very steady flow wise so you can more or less just let it go at the flows pace with just the occasional bit of holding back so you don't need a very heavy float from that point of view. However whilst you don't need a particularly heavy float for hemp and bread fishing a bigger one is useful for maggot and caster as you need a fair bulk to get down through the bleak.

Second half of the season the bleak aren't a problem so you really do just tailor your float to the flow. The surface will be going quicker than the bottom so it's just a case of figuring out the pace it needs to be going through to match the loose feed. That is much easier to do when it's steady in the first half of the season than when it tends to be really pushing second half of the season especially as the fish are not as keen on chasing bait about in cold water as they are in warmer water!
I've been fishing with floats that are a little heavier that usual this season, and to be honest it doesn't seem to have been a bad thing.

Something that is possibly a result of lockdown and watching a lot of YouTube, is that I have really started thinking a lot more about my fishing.

For example, if I fished a heavier float, does that give me more control with where I want to fish it, keeping it on the line I want, and holding back where needed.

This is the situation on my previous outing up at Inglesham (I'd call this upper Thames!), where I was literally far banking a heavy stickfloat, and holding it back to catch roach. I could not control a waggler with the flow in the middle and weed still on the bottom, but previously would have stuck it out because 'thats the normal thing' and probably had a rubbish day as a result.

I had in my mind that for this season, I was going to experiment with heavier floats, and even in the summer when the river is hardly flowing, and I have had some great days on hemp and tares, sometimes with bulked shot rather than the textbook 'shirt button light shot'.

I bought a couple of complete sets of the DH sticks, the idea being to give me coverage for most eventuality. They are big, some of them are on 26cm winders, and are heavier than I've previously used, taking a lot of shot.

I am still very much a light lines, small hooks angler and I've no reason to change.
Many thanks both for your explanations. Both clear and concise. Really useful insight.
 
Top