Match anglers - can you beat the draw bag?

Lee Richards

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"Match anglers - can you beat the draw bag?"​


Not sure of the above but looking at a few of them they have no problem beating the nose bag. πŸ™‚
 

Total

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On my last MD match I was late and my "good friends" had drawn for me. The chap in the shop said "honestly, you would be better off going pleasure fishing, that is the worst peg on the lake. I spent 3 hours on the long range feeder, exploring some empty pegs across from me, for next to nothing. I switched to the pole, fishing a top 2 + 1, loose feeding red maggots. Ended up Winning the section. If I'd fished like it from the beginning I would have taken a nugget off @Peter.
^^ Then you woke up and fell off the sofa!;):p:ROFLMAO:
 
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gingert76

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i know anglers who always draw pretty well and we get them to draw the team pegs as well lol but ive had enough good and bad pegs that even using my lucky left arm its just in my head, to be fair i think its a case of a really good anglers making the most of even a average draw where as i would need the out and out flyer to have any chance of doing well
 

Novice937

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Been discussed several times and always ends up in an argument. Might be better off as a separate thread if you really want to discuss it. It’s likely to derail this threadβ˜ΊοΈπŸ‘
I shall retire gracefully then, good Sir!
 

Neil ofthe nene

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Drawing a peg is not even half the battle won. I say about fliers that having drawn one I need three things. First is the knowledge of how to fish it to get the best from it. Second is to have the ability and tackle to do what is required and third is having the right bait and knowing how to use it.

Plenty of examples from my past of people doing badly off good pegs, others doing well off poor pegs and me being in both camps.

All I ever ask of a peg is that there is water in front of me. After that it is up to me to make the best of the swim.
 

alsur

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Drawing a peg is not even half the battle won. I say about fliers that having drawn one I need three things. First is the knowledge of how to fish it to get the best from it. Second is to have the ability and tackle to do what is required and third is having the right bait and knowing how to use it.

Plenty of examples from my past of people doing badly off good pegs, others doing well off poor pegs and me being in both camps.

All I ever ask of a peg is that there is water in front of me. After that it is up to me to make the best of the swim.
True and like you I've done both but I've also draw a flyer fished it like a idiot and still won the match and to cap it off it was a high level match with all top southern teams competing.
 

CluelessFishing

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One of the attractions of fishing as a "sport" is the factor of luck.
Many (most) sports are a mixture of luck and prowess.

Most of us would be no-hopers if there wasn't a good dollop of luck involved. ;)
This may be the first time I have completely and wholeheartedly agreed with your post probably because its not political . There are few if any sports other than fishing in which you can mix with and compete with world champions and very occasionally actually win . Anyone who has had the odd knock up at tennis for example who thinks they could "get lucky" and beat Djokovic in a 5 setter needs to give their head a serious wobble.
I like to match fish ... and I like to fish the big competitions. I freely admit I am "pools fodder" as somebody earlier mentioned many people like me are . Nevertheless I enjoy it, I can afford to do it and I will continue as long as I'm able. Just occasionally as NCP mentions I have had my dollop of luck . I have qualified for a big final . I came nowhere at the final but nevertheless I felt I'd achieved something and enjoyed it .
I also agree with the venue knowledge importance people have mentioned especially when coupled with genuine skill . For example a couple of years ago I drew next to Alan Scothorne in a big qualifier . As we talked before the match he told me we couldn't win the match where we were but he said you (meaning me) should be able to win the section . just keep throwing across tight to the bank it will be low weights it might take a while but you will catch . I asked if he would do the same and he said yes but I will struggle my peg is too shallow . Sure enough I did as he said and won the section with 17lb . he was absolutely spot on . However , if he had said nothing he would have beat me because if I hadnt caught after a couple of hours I would have come off the line and thrown all over the peg trying to find fish . So ...my point is .... being on fish is important but it's no good if you don't have the skills and knowledge to catch them.
Its not all about luck though by any means ... and good anglers are not necessarily fishing all the time .... some do have natural ability as with anything. I personally know several who get to fish maybe once a week because they work and yet at whiteacres festivals ....or at the qualifiers for big matches they are consistently there or thereabouts and its not coincidental that the line ups in those finals regularly feature the same names ....some of which as mentioned only fish once a week if they are lucky.
 

G0zzer2

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A good post by Clueless. Noddys CAN beat better anglers nearby, or even on the next peg provided - as he described - he does everything very well. That means targetting the right spot with good presentation.

The reason Alan Scotthorne is better than Clueless (as he has explained) is that Alan is much more likely to employ the best tactics, for longer. That means he is more likely to win than a beginner. That comes from experience, gut feeling, having advice from others, and sticking at the method he has confidence in. Commercials are much fairer than most 'natural' waters of course, so the 'expert' is less likely to be beaten by luck.

But great credit to Clueless for sticking at the method as advised by Alan. Yes, you can beat the draw bag and win from what is regarded as an 'average' peg, but you've got to do a lot right (as Clueless did) especially on a commercial. The problem is made worse by the fact that there are so many good anglers around now - anglers who have enough time to concentrate on their sport, and good gear. And so often matches are decided by perhaps just one good lost fish, so you do need that extra bit of luck as well.
 

booboo

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If you draw a noted bad peg, just try something different. A mate of mine drew in the middle of, what we called 'cyanide straight' on the Trent. He laid on in the side with a big lump of bread and walked the match.
Very true, regulars tend to only fish each peg a certain way and that compounds the good/bad peg thing. A couple of times I've drawn badly on a new venue but got a result because I approached it with fresh eyes. I'm by no means a decent match angler either.
 
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