Lumps on light lines

Dave Spence

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At this time of year you have to scale down to attract bites, 18 and 20 hooks etc. The problem is, there are still big lumps that will get caught and you have to decide on a balance between attracting bites whilst still giving yourself a chance of landing them. My personal preference is 2 - 2 1/2lb hook length to an 18 and plenty of elastic in a side puller kit, this allows a fish to run without putting undue pressure on the end tackle. What do you do?
 

ukzero1

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Very rare I fish the pole, preferring waggler and feeder tactics, this gives me more confidence having the reel to control a 'runner'. I do scale down a little on the waggler using a 2.5lb or 3lb hook length with a B911 18 hook depending on where I'm fishing.
 

Silverfisher

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I don’t changed my tackle in the winter so year round on the float I fish 3-4lb mainline to 2-3lb hooklengths with usually size 18s and on the feeder 6lb mainline to 3-4lb hooklengths with usually size 14-16s. I generally avoid lumps as I usually fish rivers where you don’t get anything massive or my local still water where you generally only hook one mid double a day. Hopefully it breaks the hooklength before it ruins your swim but if not I use the back wind as I feel a bit more control than with the clutch with fairly light lines and fairly soft rods.
 

nejohn

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The trick is to use balanced tackle, use light line on a rod that is to powerful and you are asking for trouble, I have no problem fishing 18/20 hooks to 1.5lb hooklengths and 3lb mainline if I am using the right rod for the job, it may take a little time to get a lump in but with care you have a chance, as has been said above by silverfisher I find backwinding gives much more control than using the clutch, I never let the rod go to extremes of bend so that the rod can still act as a shock absorber if the fish runs before I can react. I can't remember the last time I lost a fish because of the line breaking, generally if I lose fish it is because the hook hold gives way. I have had carp to 23lb and barbel to to 9lb+ on the above tackle....the Barbel was a bit hairy as it took off towards the sea like a scalded cat but with care I turned it and got it heading back in my direction
 

Neil ofthe nene

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Standard Winter pole rig for commercials - 0.10 (2-12) hooklength, 18 B611, mainline 0.13, 12 solid elastic. If lumps expected on a regular basis on the day then the hooklength will be 0.13 and B611 16.
 

banksy

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Most of the upper doubles I've had on light gear have come in very easily.
But then they've gone barmy in the landing net. That's why I always take my unhooking mate, even though I'm targeting roach.
Must be something to do with the lack of pressure I can apply to them, they just don't seem to take it seriously!
I'm sure that if I'd used a 2lb TC rod and 12lb line, it would have been a very different fight.
 

Dusty

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About the same as Neil, one of my first fish this year was a winter caught 8lb carp on a number 6 elastic and it came in very easily.
 

tedstriker

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tend to scale down to 0.14 for rig line and 0.12 for hook lengths with a solid 8 elastic, but might try some of the slik equivalent elastic soon
 

Freesolo82

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Hooks are really strong these days and even the finest patterns will get in a bonus fish with the right setup, I got a foul hooked 10lb pike in not long ago on a comic 128 to 0.08, the hook was slightly bent and on a different day I may have lost it.
If you have plenty of elastic 4,5 or 6 through the whole kit, you should be able to tame most bonus fish.
 

rudd

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Had an issue the other week, a very strange one indeed, other anglers on the bank could not fathom out my annoyance!
Was going to live bait a roving rig for Perch.
Needed some live bait.
Had speci rod set up with roving rig and a heavy waggler rod to catch a few small perch/roach with a small bag of red dead maggots.
Easy right?
2lb hooklength, 20 hook single dead red.
Two hours later no livebait and six snapped hooklength!!! All either decent Tench or Carp that tore off.
Put on 5lb hooklenght, size 16 and fished a prawn - not a sniff.
######### Typical ?

A week later did catch some livebait.
5 hours not a bite on them, bloke turns up in next peg and has three 2lb + perch in an hour using float fished live bait ?

Some days I hate fishing ?
 

Dave Spence

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Had an issue the other week, a very strange one indeed, other anglers on the bank could not fathom out my annoyance!
Was going to live bait a roving rig for Perch.
Needed some live bait.
Had speci rod set up with roving rig and a heavy waggler rod to catch a few small perch/roach with a small bag of red dead maggots.
Easy right?
2lb hooklength, 20 hook single dead red.
Two hours later no livebait and six snapped hooklength!!! All either decent Tench or Carp that tore off.
Put on 5lb hooklenght, size 16 and fished a prawn - not a sniff.
######### Typical ?

A week later did catch some livebait.
5 hours not a bite on them, bloke turns up in next peg and has three 2lb + perch in an hour using float fished live bait ?

Some days I hate fishing ?
And that is what makes it, never boring (y)
 

jononcb

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I never used to drop below 0.12 line but last winter I did fish some venues on the pole with 0.10 rigs and maggots.
It did me no harm in the matches and I landed a lot of carp to 8lb on that gear with a soft 6-8 elastic and a puller kit.
Hooks were size 20 preston S-FLB. Awesome fine wire hooks that are razor sharp and never had one straighten out touchwood!!
 

Sam Vimes

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For a few years I've been fishing a farm pond in autumn/winter that holds some stonking roach. However, it's far better known for carp. They aren't of the size that get the hardcore carpers too excited, but they are big enough. I generally do my best to avoid the carp, but they inevitably turn up at times. I've taken to fishing increasingly light fine wire hooks, light hooklinks and light canal waggler rods. The hooks are light enough that they tend to open out before even a 1lb hooklink breaks. All that was quite intentional. What wasn't quite so expected was that I'd end up landing a better proportion of the carp hooked than I did previously on heavier gear. You need a bit of space, or very understanding anglers in close proximity, to do it. The odd fish turns out to be unstoppable regardless of whatever you might do, but I prefer a hook to open out than leave a hook and short piece of line in a fish. I've landed plenty of double figure carp on 1-1.5lb hooklinks.
 

Silverfisher

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My PB 17lb carp was on a silvers gear and I've had a few others around that size on the same gear but tbh it does start to get rather uncomfortable as soon as they get into double figures and you definitely need a lot of time and space. My grandad had his first 20 this year on silvers gear and that took 17 minutes about 40 yards of space in all directions! Personally once they get near to or above double figures I prefer it when they come off straight away to save ruining my nicely built silvers swim!
 

G0zzer2

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I genuinely take my hat off to Sam, if he has landed plenty of double-figure carp on 1 lb to 1.5 lb hooklengths. As he says, you need a bit of space, but even so it's brilliant angling.
 

Sam Vimes

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it's brilliant angling.

Not at all. Getting them out is a smidge of experience, a soupcon of good gear, a dash of patience, and a large dollop of good fortune. However, I've been amazed at just how easy it is on the right gear. The experience was first noted when I started using a Drennan Super Crystalight. It's even better with the Sphere Hotrods Silver Edition. Would I advise people target carp with this type of gear? Absolutely not, but I'm actually targeting roach. As long as I'm sensible with hook and line choices, I'm not at all worried for the rod. I was initially though!
 

Silverfisher

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Fair play not worrying about the rod it takes some nerve. Probably irrational but it makes me feel sick watching £180 of carbon double over when I hook a comfortable double on my acolyte ultra. I'm left cursing at how a hooklength of not much more than 2lb can hold for so long.
 

G0zzer2

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I think the danger is the light hooklength catching on the carp's hooked dorsal fin and being cut through.
 

Sam Vimes

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Fair play not worrying about the rod it takes some nerve. Probably irrational but it makes me feel sick watching £180 of carbon double over when I hook a comfortable double on my acolyte ultra. I'm left cursing at how a hooklength of not much more than 2lb can hold for so long.

Do it often enough without incident and you'll stop worrying about the rod.

I think the danger is the light hooklength catching on the carp's hooked dorsal fin and being cut through.

As I have to stress, I'm not remotely bothered about losing the carp, I'm setting up with the intention of losing them. I'm fishing for the roach. However, that won't be an issue as I use hooklinks that aren't long enough to reach the dorsal.
 

squimp

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For a few years I've been fishing a farm pond in autumn/winter that holds some stonking roach. However, it's far better known for carp. They aren't of the size that get the hardcore carpers too excited, but they are big enough. I generally do my best to avoid the carp, but they inevitably turn up at times. I've taken to fishing increasingly light fine wire hooks, light hooklinks and light canal waggler rods. The hooks are light enough that they tend to open out before even a 1lb hooklink breaks. All that was quite intentional. What wasn't quite so expected was that I'd end up landing a better proportion of the carp hooked than I did previously on heavier gear. You need a bit of space, or very understanding anglers in close proximity, to do it. The odd fish turns out to be unstoppable regardless of whatever you might do, but I prefer a hook to open out than leave a hook and short piece of line in a fish. I've landed plenty of double figure carp on 1-1.5lb hooklinks.

That is interesting.

i fish a similar fishery but take a slightly different approach. I fish for roach and hook the odd carp up to mid doubles. I use 2 -2.5 lb hook link and a size 20 or 18 that is forged. With an old Daiwa AWL I can pull as hard as I like and nothing breaks. The rod is quite amazing It is the perfect shock absorber. It takes around 10 minutes to land the bigger carp and a bit of water, but they don’t come off.

one day I put a fine wire hook on by mistake and when I hooked a carp I opened it out in 10 seconds. That demonstrates how hard I’m pulling.

with balanced gear it incredible what you can land.
 
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