Line Technology is Thinner Better

tipitinmick

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Not really, I'm still getting used to Barbel fishing, but I'm amazed by the thick diameter of Korum Barbel line. 0.28mm at 8lb!
The way in which Barbel take and turn on a bait I wouldnt recommend anything other than a main line with a bit a stretch in it such as Maxima. Not tried the Korum Barbel line but, Im guessing at that BS for that diameter it probably is a tad stretchy ?
 

Zerkalo

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The way in which Barbel take and turn on a bait I wouldnt recommend anything other than a main line with a bit a stretch in it such as Maxima. Not tried the Korum Barbel line but, Im guessing at that BS for that diameter it probably is a tad stretchy ?

Yeah it's a bit stretchy, think they're going more for suppleness and camouflage with it than diameter, still managed to snap it when I slipped over in the mud playing the one Barbel I've hooked so far this year. :unsure: Pleased it snaps before 10lb Korum Xpert reel line of the same diameter though.

Can see why people use heavier than 8lb hooklengths for Barbel from that...
 

tipitinmick

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Yeah it's a bit stretchy, think they're going more for suppleness and camouflage with it than diameter, still managed to snap it when I slipped over in the mud playing the one Barbel I've hooked so far this year. :unsure: Pleased it snaps before 10lb Korum Xpert reel line of the same diameter though.

Can see why people use heavier than 8lb hooklengths for Barbel from that...
The Trent is so clear at the moment Zerkalo I'm down to 8lb and 5 foot hooklengths. And we are still struggling to get a take. The Trent is taking some switching on this year I know that. ?
 

Silverfisher

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I think in terms of getting bites a thin unobtrusive hooklength is the main thing although having a thin unobtrusive mainline as well can only help. The main advantage of a thinner mainline though is that it’s easier to pick up, cast and strike and is just generally less water resistant.
 

grey

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Putting it simply, you can have your mono thick/supple/stretchy, or thin/stiff/less-stretchy, or any degree of that in between!

The problem arises when we actually believe the sales pitch that their mono's thinner and more supple than competitor's, and their line has special features such as 'controlled' or 'intellegent' stretch.

As anglers, it is important we understand are able chose a line that is most suitable for the job without having the info confused by marketing hype and lies, to have mono that is consistent, reliable with good knot strength - because that's where there is the greatest difference in quality lays between brands.

The thickness and strength of the line brands like to promote are much of a muchness in mono/pre-stretched monos.
 

angry_vincent

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then, to have the mind clear off the marketing hype, the ones should stick with what have stood the test of time, like Maxima? just as example, that this line is very popular still, whether it's an old-fashioned habit or really, it is still great line - i have no idea - i choose it due to numerous positive feedback, i fish waggler and sometime bomb, and rarely feeder/method
 

grey

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German monos are on the whole the most reliable and consistent. Japanese, as good as it is, can be plagued by irregularities and inconsistencies leading to fragile batches. Most branded line is made in Japan, and not necessarily by the same manufacturer, brands will frequently chop and change who makes their line, and will change spec without notifying the angler. As far as we’re concerned, it is sold to us as the same stuff!

So, find a branded line you like and there’s no guarantee it will be the same the next time you buy it.

Maxima, Stroft along with other manufacturers such as Berkeley and Sufix are really the only monos that offer product consistency.
 

TrickyD

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For heavier lines, if you can find it, have a look at Pro logic X L N T camo, really nice, a bit of stretch, lightest is 8lb 0.22mm, comes out well in the Tackle Box line test.
 

Simon R

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Daiwa Sensor has a reputation as being inaccurate in both diameter and breaking strain - and it is - but in both cases it's to the anglers advantage

LineStated Diameter (mm)Actual Diameter (mm)Stated Breaking Strength (lbs)Actual Breaking Strength (lbs)
Daiwa Sensor Brown0.2350.220
6.00​
8.500​
Daiwa Sensor Brown0.2600.250
8.00​
10.750​
Daiwa Sensor Brown0.3100.300
10.00​
14.630​
Daiwa Sensor Br0.3300.320
12.00​
16.500​
Daiwa Sensor Brown0.3700.360
15.00​
17.630​

Those are tests done by The Tackle Box a few years ago but the line hasn't changed since.

There's a reason why some lines seem to have been around forever and others are released to a fanfare and disappear without trace within a year or two
I use Sensor because it's tough, long lasting, casts well and costs next to nowt for a bulk spool.

Simon
 

rudd

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Daiwa Sensor has a reputation as being inaccurate in both diameter and breaking strain - and it is - but in both cases it's to the anglers advantage

LineStated Diameter (mm)Actual Diameter (mm)Stated Breaking Strength (lbs)Actual Breaking Strength (lbs)
Daiwa Sensor Brown0.2350.220
6.00​
8.500​
Daiwa Sensor Brown0.2600.250
8.00​
10.750​
Daiwa Sensor Brown0.3100.300
10.00​
14.630​
Daiwa Sensor Br0.3300.320
12.00​
16.500​
Daiwa Sensor Brown0.3700.360
15.00​
17.630​

Those are tests done by The Tackle Box a few years ago but the line hasn't changed since.

There's a reason why some lines seem to have been around forever and others are released to a fanfare and disappear without trace within a year or two
I use Sensor because it's tough, long lasting, casts well and costs next to nowt for a bulk spool.

Simon
:love::love::love: Have it on most set ups from float rods to beach casters.
 

rudd

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If you are talking about the reel\main line, generally, thinner means it's been 'pre-stretched'. It has less give if you are playing a bigger fish, but would give more positive bite if fishing at distance.
Not strictly true. Depends how tight your line is from indicator of choice to lead/feeder.
Once a line starts to stretch it needs to stretch even more to register a bite (move) where as a slack/semi slack is not yet stretching so whole line has to move between lead/feeder and indicator before it starts to stretch - hence indicator moves before line stretches giving better bite indication.
At range when fishing a tight line - the tighter the better and use semi fixed or helicopter / self hooking rig.
As fish moves lead/feeder the streched line pulls back (retracts) setting hook more firmly giving a drop back bite most of the time unless fish swims directly away from the rod when indicator hits rod or tip flies round.
 

rudd

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Not strictly true. Depends how tight your line is from indicator of choice to lead/feeder.
Once a line starts to stretch it needs to stretch even more to register a bite (move) where as a slack/semi slack is not yet stretching so whole line has to move between lead/feeder and indicator before it starts to stretch - hence indicator moves before line stretches giving better bite indication.
At range when fishing a tight line - the tighter the better and use semi fixed or helicopter / self hooking rig.
As fish moves lead/feeder the streched line pulls back (retracts) setting hook more firmly giving a drop back bite most of the time unless fish swims directly away from the rod when indicator hits rod or tip flies round.
and thats why braid works at distance - no stretch to affect it?
 

richox12

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Have not tried any hi tech reel lines to comment but even with my hooklengths I am going back to thicker lines in some situations.

I bet you have but just didn't know it (due to labelling)

Why change to a thicker hooklength and change the type of line at the same time ? Why not just change to a thicker version of whatever you were using ?

Actually, what is the reason for changing to thicker anyway ? Is it to try and solve a problem with kinking, damage or something ?
 

Zerkalo

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I bet you have but just didn't know it (due to labelling)

Why change to a thicker hooklength and change the type of line at the same time ? Why not just change to a thicker version of whatever you were using ?

Actually, what is the reason for changing to thicker anyway ? Is it to try and solve a problem with kinking, damage or something ?

On the weir I fish, I use 6lb Korum Xpert reel line and was using Stroft GTM hooklengths. Meant I could fish 0.14 if I wanted a lower breaking strain than my mainline, but I felt that was a little thin and would result in bite offs from the Chub. So I was using 0.16 which breaks at 6.7lb, heavier than my mainline and meant I was loosing a lot of feeders when I got snagged.

I asked about what to do on here and was advised to try 4lb Maxima as a hooklength. Problem solved. It's easily strong enough and thick enough to prevent bite offs. And it snaps first before my mainline when snagged. I could have just gone to a heavier mainline I suppose.

The other situation is Barbel fishing, with the Korum Barbel line which is the same diameter (0.28) as 10lb Korum Xpert reel line.
 

richox12

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On the weir I fish, I use 6lb Korum Xpert reel line and was using Stroft GTM hooklengths. Meant I could fish 0.14 if I wanted a lower breaking strain than my mainline, but I felt that was a little thin and would result in bite offs from the Chub. So I was using 0.16 which breaks at 6.7lb, heavier than my mainline and meant I was loosing a lot of feeders when I got snagged.

I asked about what to do on here and was advised to try 4lb Maxima as a hooklength. Problem solved. It's easily strong enough and thick enough to prevent bite offs. And it snaps first before my mainline when snagged. I could have just gone to a heavier mainline I suppose.

The other situation is Barbel fishing, with the Korum Barbel line which is the same diameter (0.28) as 10lb Korum Xpert reel line.

I get that. Chub have good teeth !!

You were using a strong mainline but a lighter/thinner hooklength (to get bites I guess). But the Stroft hooklength became too thin to be robust enough even though actual BS was OK. Changing to a thicker hooklength in Stroft meant hooklength was stronger now than the mainline so actually risking breakages of the mainline. So you could have changed the Korum mainline up in diameter - but it might not have been as nice on the reel or to use (bit wirey maybe). Or could have simply used Korum (same as mainline) as the hooklength (might have been weak ?). Or simply even changed to using a larger diameter Stroft mainline.

One other option (all a bit late now anyway) was to have used Fluorocarbon as the hooklength as Fluorocarbon is much harder than nylon.
 

Zerkalo

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I get that. Chub have good teeth !!

You were using a strong mainline but a lighter/thinner hooklength (to get bites I guess). But the Stroft hooklength became too thin to be robust enough even though actual BS was OK. Changing to a thicker hooklength in Stroft meant hooklength was stronger now than the mainline so actually risking breakages of the mainline. So you could have changed the Korum mainline up in diameter - but it might not have been as nice on the reel or to use (bit wirey maybe). Or could have simply used Korum (same as mainline) as the hooklength (might have been weak ?). Or simply even changed to using a larger diameter Stroft mainline.

One other option (all a bit late now anyway) was to have used Fluorocarbon as the hooklength as Fluorocarbon is much harder than nylon.

That's it! A bit of a different situation to what I think the OP is talking about but as I say, I have not used hi tech reel lines.

Although I did buy some flourocarbon in 5lb, both Drennan and Preston, and found I could not get any knot strength out of it especially on spade end hooks which surprised me as a lot of people swear by it.
 

Total

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That's it! A bit of a different situation to what I think the OP is talking about but as I say, I have not used hi tech reel lines.

Although I did buy some flourocarbon in 5lb, both Drennan and Preston, and found I could not get any knot strength out of it especially on spade end hooks which surprised me as a lot of people swear by it.

Jeez, I wouldn't use flourocarbon in your snaggy weir anyway mate....Asking for trouble...(y)
 

Silverfisher

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Ive never used fluorocarbon in the light breaking strains you would use for coarse fishing but in higher breaking strains a contributory reason to why its mostly used over mono as sea fishing leaders is its abraison resistence. I guess it must be quite different in lower breaking strains.
 

richox12

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Ive never used fluorocarbon in the light breaking strains you would use for coarse fishing but in higher breaking strains a contributory reason to why its mostly used over mono as sea fishing leaders is its abraison resistence. I guess it must be quite different in lower breaking strains.

Like you, i've never ever had a problem. Ties easily eyed or spade etc. And I use 0.07mm up to about 0.20mm. The only thing I would say is that it doesn't like shot slid on it. But I'm talking No 11 shot on 0.09mm. Abrasion resistance, generally, is mostly related to diameter. Thicker lines stand up better because ... there's more of them. From memory fluorocarbons don't like heat caused by friction. Guess that's why sliding shot isn't such a good idea.
 
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