Line diameters.

Rick123

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I've been looking at line recently, trying to find something better than my old favourite Daiwa Sensor. Sensor 8lb breaks at around 10lb and has a diameter of .26. Why i was looking is because a friend told me the new Midi-hi tec line was good and fine. Diameter of .25 at 10lb but we don't know if it breaks at 10lb or more. My Daiwa at 10lb is .30 but the 8lb is as fine and breaks at the same b/s. So in truth all these companies do, is to put out a new line at the correct diameter for the given b/s. I know we all knew this guys, but it's me talking out loud really.

I looked at a load of these lines in my re-search, Gardner for example have around 8 Drennan again several, but all are much the same. Very little difference in the breaking strain to diameter, some are called tough, extra tough, or ultra limp, or stiff. But the diameters and strains differ very little. So my conclusion is I may as well stay with what I know, trust, and has never let me down. 8lb on the Trent gives me a good chance with the barbel, but still allows the roach and bream to crawl up the rod with a fine hook-link. Rich.
 

Cobweb

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I've mentioned before somewhere that Drennan moan about Daiwa's advertised line breaking strain as being false principally because Diawa's line is thicker and in fact has a higher than advertised b/s, Having said all that, as principally a feeder buff, for most of my coarse stuff, I've started thinking seriously about using line which is has less stretching capabilites for anything over about 35 meters. In that sense I've found Guru pulse line to be ideal for venues which frown upon using braid. Another plus, is that some budget rods (and reels), have low tolerance to braid line abrasion effects but are ok for Guru's pulse line

Generally, I've found advertised b/s can be confusing, but as an approximation I guess that the benchmarks you have hinted at are a good rule of thumb. One thing I will mention, is that I have started using Brownings low stretch braid alternative Cenex mono line, which is also low stretch. For example .20 mm is rated at 8.5lb b/s. I've found this line brilliant!
 

Cobweb

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I've mentioned before somewhere that Drennan moan about Daiwa's advertised line breaking strain as being false principally because Diawa's line is thicker and in fact has a higher than advertised b/s, Having said all that, as principally a feeder buff, for most of my coarse stuff, I've started thinking seriously about using line which is has less stretching capabilites for anything over about 35 meters. In that sense I've found Guru pulse line to be ideal for venues which frown upon using braid. Another plus, is that some budget rods (and reels), have low tolerance to braid line abrasion effects but are ok for Guru's pulse line

Generally, I've found advertised b/s can be confusing, but as an approximation I guess that the benchmarks you have hinted at are a good rule of thumb. One thing I will mention, is that I have started using Brownings low stretch braid alternative Cenex mono line, which is also low stretch. For example .20 mm is rated at 8.5lb b/s. I've found this line brilliant!
That's low stretch twice? Jeez!
 

Maesknoll

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Just find a line that suits your needs and preferences, gets you bites, doesn't break on average size fish and don't worry about labels.
I totally agree, find a line you trust and stick with it, but that doesn’t mean that companies should be misrepresenting diameters, anymore than any other product should be falsely labelled.
 

feldri

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I've been fishing for over 50 years and have never got used to line diameters. I've always, and still do, go on breaking strain.
0.08 and 0.12 etc means nothing to me and I really don't see why the diameter of the line is important.
What is important to me is if I am fishing for 5-6lb bream or tench, I want to know my hooklength and mainline will take the strain.
 

Silverfisher

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Yeah same I’ve always just looked at breaking strain, I don’t think you need to be so scientific with diameters. I just go with the general rules of 6-8lb mainline 3–6lb hooklengths for the feeder and 3-4lb mainline 2-3lb hooklengths for the float. You can see whether a line you are using is too thick or thin anyway so I just go for a sensible breaking strain made by a reputable brand which is usually maxima for mainline and drennan/kamasan for hooklengths.
 

Neil ofthe nene

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I totally agree, find a line you trust and stick with it, but that doesn’t mean that companies should be misrepresenting diameters, anymore than any other product should be falsely labelled.

Agree about the labelling. But things are as they are. I think everyone knows that Primark sizes are overstated when compared to someone like M&S. For now we have to work with the situation that exists.
 

richox12

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I don't know why some seem to get hung up on Diameter v B.S. Just use what makes most sense to you. I only ever think in terms of diameter. It works for me. I am not even too bothered what the B.S is (to a point). Neither way is more or less confusing than the other. Both can be accurate and both can be way out. Depends on the line/brand and how they are labelled. Find one which works for you, get to know it and stick with it.

Diameter is important to presentation as thinner line behaves differently to thicker line and vice versa. The exact same can be said of lower breaking strains of line behaving differently to heavier breaking strains of the same line. It's the same difference no matter which way you look at it.
 

Cobweb

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I don't know why some seem to get hung up on Diameter v B.S. Just use what makes most sense to you. I only ever think in terms of diameter. It works for me. I am not even too bothered what the B.S is (to a point). Neither way is more or less confusing than the other. Both can be accurate and both can be way out. Depends on the line/brand and how they are labelled. Find one which works for you, get to know it and stick with it.

Diameter is important to presentation as thinner line behaves differently to thicker line and vice versa. The exact same can be said of lower breaking strains of line behaving differently to heavier breaking strains of the same line. It's the same difference no matter which way you look at it.
If like me you own a number of rods with rings that have smaller circumferences, then diameter can become an issue. Stretch capability for distance casting is also important for bite detection I find. Other than that, for me, b/s is commonly linked to thickness, and a rod's action can negate the limitations of lighter line, giving you more options and choice
 

rudd

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I don't know why some seem to get hung up on Diameter v B.S. Just use what makes most sense to you. I only ever think in terms of diameter. It works for me. I am not even too bothered what the B.S is (to a point). Neither way is more or less confusing than the other. Both can be accurate and both can be way out. Depends on the line/brand and how they are labelled. Find one which works for you, get to know it and stick with it.

Diameter is important to presentation as thinner line behaves differently to thicker line and vice versa. The exact same can be said of lower breaking strains of line behaving differently to heavier breaking strains of the same line. It's the same difference no matter which way you look at it.
On more occasions than I can remember, switching to a heavier b/s or bigger dia. has improved bite detection and improved catch rate. This is more noticeable fishing the feeder.
 

rudd

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I've been looking at line recently, trying to find something better than my old favourite Daiwa Sensor. Sensor 8lb breaks at around 10lb and has a diameter of .26. Why i was looking is because a friend told me the new Midi-hi tec line was good and fine. Diameter of .25 at 10lb but we don't know if it breaks at 10lb or more. My Daiwa at 10lb is .30 but the 8lb is as fine and breaks at the same b/s. So in truth all these companies do, is to put out a new line at the correct diameter for the given b/s. I know we all knew this guys, but it's me talking out loud really.

I looked at a load of these lines in my re-search, Gardner for example have around 8 Drennan again several, but all are much the same. Very little difference in the breaking strain to diameter, some are called tough, extra tough, or ultra limp, or stiff. But the diameters and strains differ very little. So my conclusion is I may as well stay with what I know, trust, and has never let me down. 8lb on the Trent gives me a good chance with the barbel, but still allows the roach and bream to crawl up the rod with a fine hook-link. Rich.
I use sensor for alot of applications, cheap and cheerfull yet strong, good knot strength, good abrasion resistance and did I mention cheap?
 

solwood

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For me I go by diameter, confuses my mates when I say .16 main to .13 hooklink

What breaking strain is that

4lb main and 4lb 12 oz hooklink

That's unbalanced say then, well no the .16 breaks over 6 and as most meel lines are underrated, so perfectly balanced!!
 
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