Line bites

Do you want line bites?

  • Yes to line bites

    Votes: 12 100.0%
  • No to line bites

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    12

Zerkalo

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You're legering for whatever species. You know line bites, especially if fishing a tight line can spook the fish, but at the same time you want to know there are fish in your peg. So would you prefer to get line bites as an indication at least something is there, or no line bites?

I'm 50/50 on this, fish a bow now to avoid spooking fish on rivers, but also at least it tells me something is there, probably less of an issue of high stocking density venues.
 

robert d

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You're legering for whatever species. You know line bites, especially if fishing a tight line can spook the fish, but at the same time you want to know there are fish in your peg. So would you prefer to get line bites as an indication at least something is there, or no line bites?

I'm 50/50 on this, fish a bow now to avoid spooking fish on rivers, but also at least it tells me something is there, probably less of an issue of high stocking density venues.
Its nice to know your close to where the fish are feeding and to adjust accordingly, much better than no movement 😁
 

tipitinmick

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When fishing certain stretches of the tidal for ‘ anything and everything ‘ I don’t mind the odd liner but, when I’m fishing for Barbel and I get the odd ‘ bang ‘ I think to myself ….. Bugger that’s a spooked fish. When fishing a feeder on a clear river it’s best to have the feeder moving. Bouncing even. On a coloured river it’s best to nail it down. I weight my feeders using car tyre balancing weights. I also use a mini bait runner reel when rolling a feeder. Once you’ve weighted the feeder correctly alter the bait runner so it’s simply clicking away gently. This way you will keep as much of your ‘ paid out ‘ line as near to the river bed as possible avoiding many line bites. Roly Moses, one of the best river feeder anglers on the Trent taught me these basics maybe 35 years ago and it still works to this day.
 

Zerkalo

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I think the same when Barbel fishing, when you get a liner, I've seen videos of them spooking badly off the line. Rolling a feeder makes sense.
 

squimp

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Interesting question.

On a river with a bit of flow there isn’t a great deal you can do about it….it’s an occupational hazard.

Having said that; I plan to experiment with helicopter set ups and lead core on the river next winter. Whether it will make much difference I’m not sure and as I get so few chances it will be hard to make an objective assessment. If my mate fishes the old way that might help with finding the better set up…….

One other thing to consider is that many specialist river anglers employ some form of backlead - which is partly there to help reduce liners.

On stillwaters I routinely fish with as tight a line as I can get away with - but that is a different discussion.
 

Gaz9243

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Apr 3, 2017
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Very much depends on season and/or species. When winter fishing, I want line bites, as it gives me indication as to where they are. But lin summer, I see no advantage, as they are more active, and the location is generally more visible
 
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