keep them in the fields

Geoff P

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I lived in rural Sussex in the late 1970/80s and used to ride on the road regularly. The stables where we rode from ensured every horse was used to the sound of traffic and vehicles before ever going on the road. The staff that worked there used their own cars to drive past the horses on a regular basis and have the horses walk past an old noisy tractor which they had.
 

Robwooly

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The national speed limit signs on country lanes don't help. They imply that you can legally do 60mph down a narrow lane, whilst I wouldn't like to see road signs everywhere in the countryside I feel they'd be better placed in such areas than those that constantly help fill the coffers on some fast but safe urban roads.
 

Rich51

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is it just me or do others have issues with horses being ridden on country roads? I have no issue with horses as such, but there is a time and place and it is not on busy, narrow country lanes.
It seems to me that anyone can simply ride their horse on the road with no road tax, insurance etc, often with little or no training and a complete disregard for other road users.
Dog owners (responsible ones anyway) carry little bags to clear up after their dogs but when was the last time anyone cleared up after their horse has left a pile in the middle of the road. I once, many years ago, ended up in a ditch after skidding on a fresh pile of horse sh*t left on the apex of a bend.
I often see young girls, at an age where they can have little or no experience of road sense etc, riding horses that are far too big for them to control on the roads. A danger not only to themselves, but their horses and other road users. There seems to be an entitled attitude with many that "it is the countryside, therefore we can ride where we like" and motorists should automatically pay deference to them. If they lost control, a horse could easily write off a car in a collision, cause serious injury yet, there is no requirement for them to carry any sort of insurance. Surely this cannot be right.
You couldn't be more wrong mate.
As other posters have quite rightly said motor vehicles are way down the list in having priority on the roads
No-one should be tearing along narrow country lanes due to the other, less protected, road users.
My missus and daughter both ride horses on this type of road and most motorists are courteous and polite, as are my gals.
There are a few d#ckhead drivers about though who don't deserve their license and should leave the car at home.
I'm sure you're not one of them though... ;)
 

tipitinmick

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Sorry, you clearly dont come out into rural Britain very often.
If worried about horses and young riders watch out for tractors - many of them agricultural machines being driven on roads have 16 year olds behind the wheel.
There's livestock legally being driven down or across roads at times, and the wildlife! Where I live you have a very high chance if hitting a deer (We have red, fallow, munkjac and chinese to pick from), badgers, foxes, pigeons and pheasant/partridge.
A few cars get written off per year as well as many windscreens / grills need replacing.
Then theres the ever present lycra menace and in villages / towns the worst of the lot:

Disability scooters - on roads, paths, bridleways, playing fields with no regards whatsoever with other users.

Sounds like you live where I live rudd. 😳 This was one unfortunate car driver over the weekend. A car in a ditch signifies the start of winter around here. 🤣🤣
 

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dry nets

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(@dry nets I thought horses came higher in that list that pedal cyclists (ie. give way precedence)
It could be, i was told it went in order of popularity ie more people than cyclist and more cyclists than horse riders. Things could charge over time.
 

MrBen

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Sounds like you live where I live rudd. 😳 This was one unfortunate car driver over the weekend. A car in a ditch signifies the start of winter around here. 🤣🤣
The amount of those incidents I’ve recovered is silly, the worst part is the first thing they tell you, “I wasn’t speeding”, got so fed up of hearing I told one young lad, in that case if you’d have gone faster you would have made it round the corner, the puzzled look was stunning.
 

JLK

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Might get shut of the car for work and get a horse. What's the running cost PA?
No toad tax, insurance, fuel.
Can you ride one on the motorway? 🤔🤔
 

Geoff P

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Might get shut of the car for work and get a horse. What's the running cost PA?
No toad tax, insurance, fuel.
Can you ride one on the motorway? 🤔🤔
Time you pay for vets bills, farriers, feed , insurance, stabling etc cheaper running a car!!!
 

Arry

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Time you pay for vets bills, farriers, feed , insurance, stabling etc cheaper running a car!!!
We had 2.... a 'kin arm and a leg... the vets fees were eyewateringly expensive... especially for a major illness like Cholic or Laminitis (they did for our two sadly) £120 every 8-10 weeks for shoeing, approx £150 a week for DIY livery... possibly about £300 for full livery and then there's hay, short feed, straw/chippings for bedding, worming every 13 weeks... a rich persons pastime nowadays
 

Foul hooked

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Look, I am not against horses, they are a part of our countryside and I respect that and always drive slowly and cautiously near them. My point is what if they do cause an accident? There should be a law that requires compulsory insurance if ridden on a public highway. How would you feel if your motor was written off due to accident caused by an uninsured horse rider?
 

Zerkalo

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I always think it's surprising there aren't more accidents involving horses or cyclists. I think they're quite rare compared to car crashes.
 

grey

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Look, I am not against horses, they are a part of our countryside and I respect that and always drive slowly and cautiously near them. My point is what if they do cause an accident? There should be a law that requires compulsory insurance if ridden on a public highway. How would you feel if your motor was written off due to accident caused by an uninsured horse rider?
There are about 1000 accidents a year involving horses. 5% result in horses death, 12% the horse is injured, 13% the rider is badly injured or killed. 0% the driver of the car was badly injured.

Motor vehicles are considered a major danger to other road users, it is therefore compulsory their owners be insured for their liability for injury or death to third parties or damage to their property. Horses, bicycles and pedestrians are recognised as 'vulnerable road users', and do not represent the same level of danger to other road users - as it is considered such low risk, it is considered unnecessary to insist on compulsory insurance to cover their liability.

You have to realise that nearly all our country roads were built for pedestrian and horse-drawn traffic. The motor vehicle is the guest on these roads, the horse has the right and priority over the motor. So in an accident, you will be considered at fault unless you can prove otherwise.

This does not mean the horse rider is not liable should they cause injury or death. Nor does it mean they are not liable for damage, but it does mean it's extremely difficult to prove the horse rider was at fault. So the onus is generally on the driver of the motor vehicle to prove they have done everything correctly.

That's why, if you have collision insurance on your vehicle (most insurances include this except third party), then your vehicle is covered against an accident with a horse whoever's at fault.

If your insurance doesn't cover it, you can demand settlement if the rider is deemed negligent. Even if you do have insurance and it pays up, you can still demand the rider pay your excess if negligent.

Worth noting a few things about cars being damaged by the uninsured:
• most horse riders on roads are actually insured (for their own peace of mind), though it isn't a legal requirement.
• there is an estimated 1 million uninsured drivers in the UK which poses a far greater threat to your vehicle.
• there are 75x more road accidents with wild deer than horses.
• bicycles and pedestrians can damage your car too - they won't be insured either.

So, if your car is written off or damaged by the uninsured, your insurance will likely cover it. Should you only have third party coverage: you are clearly prepared to 'run the gauntlet' against the greater risks of uninsured hit n run, cyclists and wild animals - the low risk of horses should cause you no additional alarm.
 
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Godber

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Got called to a horse upside down in a ditch along a lane. Got there just as the vet slotted it in the head. Black horse, teenage rider had dark clothing, no hi viz or lights, winter evening. Poor bloke in the car was distraught, came round the bend and whallop. Stupid girl, lucky she wasn't seriously hurt.
 

Lee Richards

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"I always think it's surprising there aren't more accidents involving horses or cyclists. I think they're quite rare compared to car crashes."

Car crash figures will be generated from insurance claims.
Most cycle accidents will go unreported as the cyclist won't accept liability and a tonne of steel against tube and flesh is a bit one sided.
 

Arry

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In the main most horses are insured anyway for a minimum of 3rd party liability and for vets fees... there are very few that don't... just in case and its high time mamils started getting 3rd party insurance minimum
 

Wey Back

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It was the policy of the stables where our youngest daughter used to ride (like Geoff P rural Sussex) that riders were taught and assessed before taking a horse on the roads. This was for a number of reasons already discussed, but also to lessen the chance of their investment and income being wiped out.
Fortunately most people using the roads in and around the stables were aware of the situation, unlike Speedy Gonzales in a DPD van who had to demolish a hedge and park in a field to avoid a collision!
 
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