keep them in the fields

Foul hooked

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is it just me or do others have issues with horses being ridden on country roads? I have no issue with horses as such, but there is a time and place and it is not on busy, narrow country lanes.
It seems to me that anyone can simply ride their horse on the road with no road tax, insurance etc, often with little or no training and a complete disregard for other road users.
Dog owners (responsible ones anyway) carry little bags to clear up after their dogs but when was the last time anyone cleared up after their horse has left a pile in the middle of the road. I once, many years ago, ended up in a ditch after skidding on a fresh pile of horse sh*t left on the apex of a bend.
I often see young girls, at an age where they can have little or no experience of road sense etc, riding horses that are far too big for them to control on the roads. A danger not only to themselves, but their horses and other road users. There seems to be an entitled attitude with many that "it is the countryside, therefore we can ride where we like" and motorists should automatically pay deference to them. If they lost control, a horse could easily write off a car in a collision, cause serious injury yet, there is no requirement for them to carry any sort of insurance. Surely this cannot be right.
 

Lee Richards

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Yes it's just you and push bikes are more a concern than horses.
Agricultural vehicles leave far more debris on the road than animals and its just an acceptable way of life if you life in rural communities.
 

Zerkalo

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My sister told me she had a confrontation with a pair of horse riders. In all honesty she is a slow driver, but apparently she came round a corner on a country lane and spooked a couple of horses that were being ridden. Apparently, the riders were shouting all kinds of obscenities at her. Fortunately I've never had such an encounter and most of the time it is just about slowing down and waving at each other.
 

Foul hooked

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Agricultural vehicles leave far more debris on the road than animals and its just an acceptable way of life if you life in rural communities.
but it shouldn't be. I was working on a construction site, where the highways authority insisted that a wheel wash was put in at the site entrance/exit to prevent mud being tracked onto the road and a road sweeper engaged on a daily basis. This cost the contractors a small fortune, yet only 50M down the road, the local farmer was constantly in and out of his fields with a tractor spreading all sorts of cr*p on the road for miles. Not just mud but sileage and all sorts. Yes it is somewhat unavoidable, and the farmer has as much right to earn a living as anyone else but surely the rules should be the same for all road users regardless.
I am not anti farmer or rural pastimes at all, and i always slow down and give horses a wide berth as any respectful road user should, but cannot understand why they should not be required to have compulsory insurance (the same applies to cyclists too)
 

rudd

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is it just me or do others have issues with horses being ridden on country roads? I have no issue with horses as such, but there is a time and place and it is not on busy, narrow country lanes.
It seems to me that anyone can simply ride their horse on the road with no road tax, insurance etc, often with little or no training and a complete disregard for other road users.
Dog owners (responsible ones anyway) carry little bags to clear up after their dogs but when was the last time anyone cleared up after their horse has left a pile in the middle of the road. I once, many years ago, ended up in a ditch after skidding on a fresh pile of horse sh*t left on the apex of a bend.
I often see young girls, at an age where they can have little or no experience of road sense etc, riding horses that are far too big for them to control on the roads. A danger not only to themselves, but their horses and other road users. There seems to be an entitled attitude with many that "it is the countryside, therefore we can ride where we like" and motorists should automatically pay deference to them. If they lost control, a horse could easily write off a car in a collision, cause serious injury yet, there is no requirement for them to carry any sort of insurance. Surely this cannot be right.
Sorry, you clearly dont come out into rural Britain very often.
If worried about horses and young riders watch out for tractors - many of them agricultural machines being driven on roads have 16 year olds behind the wheel.
There's livestock legally being driven down or across roads at times, and the wildlife! Where I live you have a very high chance if hitting a deer (We have red, fallow, munkjac and chinese to pick from), badgers, foxes, pigeons and pheasant/partridge.
A few cars get written off per year as well as many windscreens / grills need replacing.
Then theres the ever present lycra menace and in villages / towns the worst of the lot:

Disability scooters - on roads, paths, bridleways, playing fields with no regards whatsoever with other users.
 

Foul hooked

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Sorry, you clearly dont come out into rural Britain very often.
If worried about horses and young riders watch out for tractors - many of them agricultural machines being driven on roads have 16 year olds behind the wheel.
There's livestock legally being driven down or across roads at times, and the wildlife! Where I live you have a very high chance if hitting a deer (We have red, fallow, munkjac and chinese to pick from), badgers, foxes, pigeons and pheasant/partridge.
A few cars get written off per year as well as many windscreens / grills need replacing.
Then theres the ever present lycra menace and in villages / towns the worst of the lot:

Disability scooters - on roads, paths, bridleways, playing fields with no regards whatsoever with other users.
Actually i live right on the edge of town and drive thousands of miles a year on country roads. Totally agree with you though. The point i am trying to make is that many of these other road users have no insurance, need no sort of license etc.
 

squimp

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I live in the country and my other half rides horses; sometimes on the road.

It is a way of life here.

But you get stupid horse riders as well as really stupid cyclists, pedestrians and even car drivers.

One family that lives in our village walk their dog and very young children on single track roads complete with blind bends. Sometimes the kids/dog are 20 yards in front of the parent and just asking to be run over by an unsuspecting motorist going at normal speed.

A couple of days ago I saw a lorry very nearly decapitate a cyclist that came round a blind bend on a narrow road. The cyclist was cutting the corner and missed the lorry by inches……insanity.

And I haven’t even mentioned agricultural vehicles……
 

rudd

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Actually i live right on the edge of town and drive thousands of miles a year on country roads. Totally agree with you though. The point i am trying to make is that many of these other road users have no insurance, need no sort of license etc.
There are probably some very old laws in place with regards to bridleways - which can be used by any non motorised form of transport.
As horses and bicycles have no registration plates as not motorised, no insurance needed.
I feel disability carts/scooters and electronic bicycles, many of which can exceed 25mph should have the need to be registered and be liable for insurance as they are motorised.
 

Arry

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My Lass was out on her horse one sunday afternoon round the back lanes, when a whole bunch of club cyclists all thinking they were tour de France wannabees came rocketing round the bend... one of them glanced my lasses right stirrup it was that close... Jackies Horse (Sovereign) rightly alarmed, span around and lashed out with both barrels and left four riders groaning in the ditch... bikes on the floor and people shouting and hollering, all because some lycra clad wannabes had no sense of self control... another instance I was out riding with Jackie, I was in front and a twunt in a beemer came up behind and blasted his horn... poor old Sov danced across the road and matey boy stopped and started shouting abuse at Jackie... I got down and handed the reins to the lass and pointed out the error of his ways with a frank exchange of views which left him with a sore face... horses have every right to be on the road... same as Mamils, bikers and pedestrians... deal with it
 

62tucker

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Had to deal with no 92 this morning. Part and parcel of walks in the countryside.
 

dave the fish

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It’s not just rural areas where horses are ridden in the roads. It’s not uncommon in Woolwich SE London to encounter the Royal Horse Artillery taking their horses to be exercised. 10 to 15 riders each with another 2 horses at their side.
You can imagine the amount of rubbish they leave in the road.
 

Robwooly

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I've noticed horses really hate bycycles, same with when I'm walking with the fishing gear I make sure the rod and net are held low and out of the eyeline. Cyclists should yield to horses or slow down at least and make themselves heard in advance when possible.

In the part of London where I used to reside there was no such thing as the highway code, you just prayed no uninsured driver went in to you, I know you get them everywhere but on one occasion one almost went through the front room, our luck was at the expense of the parked car that was a shield to our house acommodating an uninsured car. I'd take horses and cows any day. Plus their poo is better, my father in law used to stop the car and scrape it up for fertilizer, you can't do that with arboreal dog poo bags.
 

62tucker

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A pony and trap goes down our street on a regular basis. No idea where it comes from.
Years ago one got spooked down felling bypass. A very busy road. The horse jumped the central barrier and the poor lad driving it was killed ☹️
 

NoCarpPlease

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It’s not just rural areas where horses are ridden in the roads. It’s not uncommon in Woolwich SE London to encounter the Royal Horse Artillery taking their horses to be exercised. 10 to 15 riders each with another 2 horses at their side.
You can imagine the amount of rubbish they leave in the road.
when I was in Hospital in February (Royal Brompton) the Cavalry Blacks would ride up the street every day at about 8.30 am doing the same (normally one rider + 1). it's pretty built up round that way ;)

@Robwooly - in my experience horses get alarmed when things suddenly appear that they can't hear .... so always shout a warning or ring my bell when approaching horses from the rear on a bicycle.

@dry nets I thought horses came higher in that list that pedal cyclists (ie. give way precedence)

It's simple really - when in charge of a motor vehicle you are (hopefully) in control of a lethal weapon ... so some form of testing and insurance is needed.
 

G0zzer2

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is it just me or do others have issues with horses being ridden on country roads? I have no issue with horses as such, but there is a time and place and it is not on busy, narrow country lanes.
Why are the narrow country roads so busy? Vehicles! Perhaps vehicles should be taken off narrow country roads and horses should be allowed on them, as they have been for thousands of years.

I live in the country and have no issues with horses. I just slow up if I meet or overtake one. They are better off on narrow country roads than on Motorways! Don't you agree?
 

ukzero1

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Where I live, horses, farm traffic (tractors, combines etc.) are an every day occurrence round here. All drivers need to do is be a bit more alert when going through rural areas.
 

Geoff P

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I often see young girls, at an age where they can have little or no experience of road sense etc, riding horses that are far too big for them to control on the roads. A danger not only to themselves, but their horses and other road users. There seems to be an entitled attitude with many that "it is one r countryside, therefore we can ride where we like" and motorists should automatically pay deference to them. If they lost control, a horse could easily write off a car in a collision, cause serious injury yet, there is no requirement for them to carry any sort of insurance. Surely this cannot be right.
The majority of those "young girls" are perfectly able to control a horse which can weigh half a ton and have a lot more road sense than most of the drivers on the road. The horses would only be taken on the road if they were found to be safe with traffic.

It is quite simple: On seeing a horse on the road (whether ridden, driven or led), please slow down to a maximum of 15mph and be prepared to stop if necessary. Heed a riders or carriage drivers signal if they ask you to stop or slow down.
 

Flathead

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Try driving in Newmarket

horses have the right of way all over the town….including the centre.

not unusual to have to wait for a string of horses to cross the road.
 

davylad

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I live semi country Geoff, and we get quite a lot of riders on the local roads. I often see a young rider struggling to control the horse they're riding, but they have to learn away from the stables sometime. Car drivers shouldn't speed on country roads full stop, there's always going to be something crop up, maybe just round a tight bend. I fly on motorways, but rarely do more than 45 / 50 on country roads.
 
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