JRT crossed with?

Simon R

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We lost our elderly Westie in October last year (kidney failure) and SWMBO declared that we wouldn't get another dog as it was too tying.

I knew we'd end up getting something but since even a mongrel (sorry a cross-breed with a stupid name) would cost £2000+ we just registered with the various dog rehoming charities in the area. Due to lockdown none of them had a great deal of choice - unless you wanted a greyhound, lurcher or staffie (we didn't) - and when smaller dogs did appear they got snapped up in minutes.

Eventually we got lucky and ended up with this little chap named Dylan (no he doesn't sing) who had already been rehomed once and then returned to the local rescue centre

Lockwood 007c.jpg

Approximately eight years old and facially he's a Jack Russell - and displays typical terrier traits (ie loves a good dig - especially the planter in the front garden) - but he's got much longer legs and bigger ears than a JRT and the body shape is different. His papers state he's a Jack Russell cross but crossed with what?
He jumps two or three feet in the air whenever he sees either food or his lead and is lightning fast, so I tend to think he's got some whippet in him.

He's a right handful - he hates other dogs and even when on the lead he'll strain to attack them - even if he spots one 100 yards away he'll stop dead, tail erect and give a warning bark. Other dogs on leads aren't a problem but it's the ones running loose that worry me - I have no idea exactly what he'll do if he gets close enough, so I've got a soft fabric restraint that only allows him to open his mouth a couple of inches - enough to bark and pant but not enough to bite.
Hates being on his own and follows me around like a lost sheep - we already had a dog bed downstairs but he won't stay in it at night so we got another so he can sleep upstairs too.

Owning him for the last ten weeks or so has certainly improved my fitness - our Westie was getting on a bit and although still keen to go for a walk only ambled along - so we probably covered about a mile on our usual half hour walk - same duration walk with Dylan and we're covering twice as far 'cos he trots along at a fair old lick - and he insists on an evening stroll too.

So anybody got any advance on whippet as part of his parentage?

Simon
 

Dave

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I'd say the head is more Whippet which could also give him that sleek look.
JRTs originally had long legs and it's only through breeding that they ended up with short legs...


Personally I'd be concerned with his hatred of other dogs as that could present a problem if not trained out of him. Do you know why he was returned to the rescue centre?
 

juttle

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Although the size is wrong, he has the look of a pharaoh hound about him! Good looking dog though, I hope he fits in and you end up keeping him - everybody needs a dog in their life!
 

mickthechippy

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Looking at the picture

theres a whiff of manchester terrier there,


the clingyness and other dog problem smacks of very little, if not no socialisation when a pup, possibly a dog that never really went out

the more he sees em the better he should get
 
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nejohn

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Could it be a Jack Russell crossed with a Shitzu .... Then it would be a Jack S**t......I will get my coat..
Seriously looking at the body shape there could be some whippet in the mix
 

bluemack

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You could get a DNA test on him,i don,t know how accurate they are though.
Good luck with him ,he,s gorgeous.:love:
 

mickthechippy

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My best guess, a Basenji.
Basenji Dog.jpg
I had a basenji once about 25 year ago

strange little dog, lady who owned her died and i took it in from the daughter,

got used to my mutts at the time and became part of the pack, it couldnt bark, just made this proper weird howling sound, shoulda heard it when it was marking a rabbit earth, like summat outta doctor who
 

Simon R

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the clingyness and other dog problem smacks of very little, if not no socialisation when a pup, possibly a dog that never really went out

the more he sees em the better he should get
The lack of socialisation is what we reckon too.
He is getting a little better with dogs that he's met a few times - next door have an eight month old mastiff cross and he just sniffs at him through the fence now. Girl down the road has a couple of Shetland Sheepdogs that she walks at the same time I go out on a morning and he more or less ignores them.

The greenbelt and beck where we walk on a morning is unfortunately where every other dog owner heads for too so if I spot another dog I just make a wide detour.
Problem is the old saying that you can't teach an old dog new tricks is proving very true.

Simon
 

Dave Spence

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The lack of socialisation is what we reckon too.
He is getting a little better with dogs that he's met a few times - next door have an eight month old mastiff cross and he just sniffs at him through the fence now. Girl down the road has a couple of Shetland Sheepdogs that she walks at the same time I go out on a morning and he more or less ignores them.

The greenbelt and beck where we walk on a morning is unfortunately where every other dog owner heads for too so if I spot another dog I just make a wide detour.
Problem is the old saying that you can't teach an old dog new tricks is proving very true.

Simon
I had 2 rescue greyhounds mate and they would attack anything none human. They never grew out of it but, it's not so much of a problem with a bit of care. I used to carry muzzles with me and if a dog approached I would, meaningfully wrap the leads around my arm and slip the muzzles over their heads. The other owners, invariably, retrieved their pets.
 

FishermanEire

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I had 2 rescue greyhounds mate and they would attack anything none human. They never grew out of it but, it's not so much of a problem with a bit of care. I used to carry muzzles with me and if a dog approached I would, meaningfully wrap the leads around my arm and slip the muzzles over their heads. The other owners, invariably, retrieved their pets.

I do exactly this with Jess
 

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Markywhizz

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You could get a DNA test on him,i don,t know how accurate they are though.
Good luck with him ,he,s gorgeous.:love:
Dog DNA tests are just a con. We got one and were very sceptical about the results so we had one with a different company and it was completely different and equally suspect.

Dylan looks like a lovely little chap Simon. Good luck with him. We have a rescue dog who had some challenging behaviours when we got him. It is a wonderful feeling when they really settle in even if it takes a while.
 
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bluemack

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Dog DNA tests are just a con. We got one and were very sceptical about the results so we had one with a different company and it was completely different and equally suspect.

Dylan looks like a lovely little chap Simon. Good luck with him. We have a rescue dog who had some challenging behaviours when we got him. It is a wonderful feeling when they really settle in even if it takes a while.
That,s fair enough mate,i did consider it for my doggie but decided against it, probably did,nt trust em to be honest.:(
I know at the time it cost about 80 quid...................and Simon being a Yorkshireman...............:)
 

Simon R

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I know at the time it cost about 80 quid...................and Simon being a Yorkshireman...............:)
Do be honest I wasn't aware DNA tests for dogs were available
I wouldn't pay eighty quid for a test - not due to any Yorkshire heritage but simply 'cos I'm not really all that bothered. :p

Simon
 

mickthechippy

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Do be honest I wasn't aware DNA tests for dogs were available
I wouldn't pay eighty quid for a test - not due to any Yorkshire heritage but simply 'cos I'm not really all that bothered. :p

Simon
they were developed due to all the car theft and burglary committed by Mutts
 
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