Is match fishing fairer in winter?

Dave Spence

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On some of the 'big weight' commercials you need to start catching from the off if you are to be in with a chance of winning; this means that you have to get the method right from the first chuck.

In winter the subsequent drop in weights, means that you will have, perhaps a couple of hours to 'sort it out' and you could win the match during the last hour. Does this make fishing in winter fairer?
 

spark1

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Winter match fishing can be peggy, but its normally the better anglers who sort out a peg and get the most out of it and most of the time do better than the not so good anglers who may be on a better peg. Winter match fishing is no fairer than summer match fishing imo
9 times out of 10 its the quality of angler that makes the difference.
 

Silverfisher

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I don’t match fish but Sams reply makes perfect sense to me. I have my favoured pegs in the warmer months but I know that I can probably catch well on most pegs whereas the opposite is often the case in the winter.
 

jononcb

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Not on venues that are mainly carp only.
They ball up and a lot blank.
Silver fish venues are fairer.
My club has been on Aldercar today and
weights were.....
1st 47lb
2nd 16lb
3rd 7lb
 

mickthechippy

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I tend to do better in winter, mainly because of my preffered style of fishing

I have no qualms to snatch bits from the off,

starting short under my feet, for the eyes and arses and following them out, speed fishing to hand, sometimes I will have hundreds of fish in the net, proper busy days, you dont have the time to get cold

there is always though, those that sit it out for the bigger fish breaking your heart with just the one landed
 

Neil ofthe nene

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In my experience good anglers do well all year round. Margins may be smaller but winners tend to be winners.
 

Dave

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I recall a conversation with @pauln after the MD's Fur & Feather at Lindholme last weekend.
Basically he explained his tactics which led to him winning the match overall, I think he said he fed something like six maggots in total, apart from hookbait, he fished the lightest bomb possible to not disturb fish he cast near to, and basically just picked them off one by one.

Now, looking logically at this, in winter when the water temperature is cold the fish don't move around as much, they seldom feed anywhere near summer levels, if at all.
So you have a fish (Carp) sat semi-dormant minding it's own business, whiling away time until the water starts to warm up again. It might not move from that spot for a while unless it has to.
The last thing you want to do is give it the reason to move away, ie dropping a weight near enough to it to spook it.
Once the fish moves away, unless you are lucky enough to land on a shoal, your bomb or feeder is sat by itself with no fish near, waiting for what could be an age for one to come by.

I say feeder, but then again the fish aren't feeding because they don't need to and any food eaten would most likely just sit in their gut rather than be passed through, due to the cold water temperature.
So therefore, no feed is required as it would just add to the weight and splash, disturbing the fish.

Now, you can't present a bare hook and expect to catch anything, so a single maggot becomes the attractant, after all the fish might not be feeding but they won't have forgotten what food is. That one mere morsel might be just enough to entice the fish to take a nibble.

So, in conclusion, use a bomb which is heavy enough to cast to where you want to fish but light enough to not disturb the water and spook any fish nearby.
Offer a small morsel of food sufficient to attract a nibble but not present a three course meal.
Search around for the fish rather than wait for the fish to come to you.

Is that right Paul?
 

Maesknoll

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No, definitely not fairer in winter. Some of the venues I fish are completely bound by the draw, no matter what the class of angler, there are pegs that never produce and pegs that throw up weights every match. Aquatic bingo is an oft used phrase. There are many more pegs that can won from in summer, as fish move around looking for food.
 

pauln

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I recall a conversation with @pauln after the MD's Fur & Feather at Lindholme last weekend.
Basically he explained his tactics which led to him winning the match overall, I think he said he fed something like six maggots in total, apart from hookbait, he fished the lightest bomb possible to not disturb fish he cast near to, and basically just picked them off one by one.

Now, looking logically at this, in winter when the water temperature is cold the fish don't move around as much, they seldom feed anywhere near summer levels, if at all.
So you have a fish (Carp) sat semi-dormant minding it's own business, whiling away time until the water starts to warm up again. It might not move from that spot for a while unless it has to.
The last thing you want to do is give it the reason to move away, ie dropping a weight near enough to it to spook it.
Once the fish moves away, unless you are lucky enough to land on a shoal, your bomb or feeder is sat by itself with no fish near, waiting for what could be an age for one to come by.

I say feeder, but then again the fish aren't feeding because they don't need to and any food eaten would most likely just sit in their gut rather than be passed through, due to the cold water temperature.
So therefore, no feed is required as it would just add to the weight and splash, disturbing the fish.

Now, you can't present a bare hook and expect to catch anything, so a single maggot becomes the attractant, after all the fish might not be feeding but they won't have forgotten what food is. That one mere morsel might be just enough to entice the fish to take a nibble.

So, in conclusion, use a bomb which is heavy enough to cast to where you want to fish but light enough to not disturb the water and spook any fish nearby.
Offer a small morsel of food sufficient to attract a nibble but not present a three course meal.
Search around for the fish rather than wait for the fish to come to you.

Is that right Paul?

Yes Dave

In winter you need to catch the feeding fish in your peg
I fed one area with maggot ( maggots do crawl in the silt ) and fed 6-8 at a time I did not catch on this line but had 2 roach bites.
on the bomb I used bread and corn both are big bright baits.
If they had wanted to feed they would have come to this but did not.
I had two bombs on my side tray one would get me 22-28 turns of my reel and the other 48 turns ( the island )
Bites came quickly so I did not leave it long in the same place ( explore the peg )
I find a splash in winter often has the opposite affect as it does in summer ( hence small bomb ( 6g ) or olivette )
Note you can pick one spot and put some feed but I tend to use a small cage feeder the size of your finger tip ( 6x3 mesh )
I did not put enough (4 feeders of micros) on this line as they turned up with an hour and half to go but left quickly and settled to the angler on the next peg in the last hour.
 
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pauln

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The picture is my winter collection

As for the OP.
In winter the fish are often tightly balled draw one peg away and some days they will not move, It is more often the luck of the draw. Is that fairer ? well probably as its often down to luck, I have seen plenty of "good" anglers beaten off the next peg in winter its a great leveller but too cold.
 

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rudd

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Yes Dave

In winter you need to catch the feeding fish in your peg
I fed one area with maggot ( maggots do crawl in the silt ) and fed 6-8 at a time I did not catch on this line but had 2 roach bites.
on the bomb I used bread and corn both are big bright baits.
If they had wanted to feed they would have come to this but did not.
I had two bombs on my side tray one would get me 22-28 turns of my reel and the other 48 turns ( the island )
Bites came quickly so I did not leave it long in the same place ( explore the peg )
I find a splash in winter often has the opposite affect as it does in summer ( hence small bomb ( 6g ) or olivette )
Note you can pick one spot and put some feed but I tend to use a small cage feeder the size of your finger tip ( 6x3 mesh )
I did not put enough (4 feeders of micros) on this line as they turned up with an hour and half to go but left quickly and settled to the angler on the next peg in the last hour.
Are you targeting carp?
 

pauln

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On that day yes, I asked in the shop what weight had been winning and 80lb was the answer.
I did have a maggot feeder line but could see ppl catching silvers of less than an oz.
I did have a nice perch over 1lb
 

rudd

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On that day yes, I asked in the shop what weight had been winning and 80lb was the answer.
Ok, though so.
I have done ok using bandums 6mm or 8mm pop ups in winter straight off a bomb.
Having been involved in lake management for years - found carp sit midwater in the winter doing nothing alot of the time.
 

Dave Spence

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I recall a conversation with @pauln after the MD's Fur & Feather at Lindholme last weekend.
Basically he explained his tactics which led to him winning the match overall, I think he said he fed something like six maggots in total, apart from hookbait, he fished the lightest bomb possible to not disturb fish he cast near to, and basically just picked them off one by one.

Now, looking logically at this, in winter when the water temperature is cold the fish don't move around as much, they seldom feed anywhere near summer levels, if at all.
So you have a fish (Carp) sat semi-dormant minding it's own business, whiling away time until the water starts to warm up again. It might not move from that spot for a while unless it has to.
The last thing you want to do is give it the reason to move away, ie dropping a weight near enough to it to spook it.
Once the fish moves away, unless you are lucky enough to land on a shoal, your bomb or feeder is sat by itself with no fish near, waiting for what could be an age for one to come by.

I say feeder, but then again the fish aren't feeding because they don't need to and any food eaten would most likely just sit in their gut rather than be passed through, due to the cold water temperature.
So therefore, no feed is required as it would just add to the weight and splash, disturbing the fish.

Now, you can't present a bare hook and expect to catch anything, so a single maggot becomes the attractant, after all the fish might not be feeding but they won't have forgotten what food is. That one mere morsel might be just enough to entice the fish to take a nibble.

So, in conclusion, use a bomb which is heavy enough to cast to where you want to fish but light enough to not disturb the water and spook any fish nearby.
Offer a small morsel of food sufficient to attract a nibble but not present a three course meal.
Search around for the fish rather than wait for the fish to come to you.

Is that right Paul?
Paul told me that the only reason he didn't feed was because he could not catapult corn accurately:rolleyes: If he had a decent catty he might not have won the match.
 
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