I'm pretty much done with lure fishing (because I'm a lazy angler)

Robwooly

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Angling pressure is a major factor, we are a tiny island with a lot of people, also on most waters there are only two predator species that take lures regularly - Yes there's other species that take lures but Pike and Perch are most peoples quarry here, perch are plentiful but the majority will have seen plenty of lures by the time they are older and wiser.
 

DFL

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Angling pressure is a major factor, we are a tiny island with a lot of people, also on most waters there are only two predator species that take lures regularly - Yes there's other species that take lures but Pike and Perch are most peoples quarry here, perch are plentiful but the majority will have seen plenty of lures by the time they are older and wiser.
Same goes with bass on some of our shorelines.
 

OldTaff

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OK, but why would you blank that often? Are the fish so pressured that they just won't hit artificials?

Do I catch more fish with live bait? Absolutely. But do I blank with artificials? Almost never.

Again, I'm just curious why it's so different "across the pond".

I wouldn’t say it’s because they are pressured but rather that they are in waters with an abundance of natural feed and savvy enough to tell an artificial from live bait - however when that artificial is worked well their natural instinct to attack the lure is triggered and bingo you have your fish.
 

Robwooly

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Same goes with bass on some of our shorelines.
Bass have amazing eyesight, I often wonder if the perch's are just as good, could be also that because both bass and perch are often taking other food sources aside from live fish this makes them harder on lures given their huge numbers in comparison to pike for example
 

centerpin fan

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OK, I understand a little better. Here are some things I do:

1) I know the drop shot is all the rage, but I never use them. I prefer the jig.

2) Lighter is almost always better with jigs. To me, a 2 gram head is huge, and I rarely use them. One gram is my favorite, and I sometimes go lighter.

3) Nothing heavier than .20 line. .12 to .16 are better choices.

4) I use 1-2” plastic bodies 95% of the time. In colder water, fur/feathers are often a better choice. Marabou feathers and rabbit fur have a very subtle action.

5) I just cast the jig out, count it down to my chosen depth, and reel back slow and steady — no “jigging” or erratic movements.

6) I generally use fixed spool reels, but closed face is very good, too, because of the slower retrieve ratio. It’s hard to retrieve a jig too slowly, but it’s very easy to retrieve too fast.

I can’t guarantee any of that will help on your waters, but I hope it does. :)
 

qtaran111

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Some good tips there I think, but jig or dropshot for me depends on where I’m fishing. If I’m on a canal and fishing along the piling, boat, etc right at my feet, it’s dropshot time. If I’m casting across, then jig. Dropshot is a very specific tool but has its place, jig more versatile.

As for small rivers and streams, the chub here go bananas for those small 1.5” crayfish creature lures on a cheb.
 

DFL

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This video perfectly illustrates that you can dropshot in different subtle ways more akin to jigging

 

R0B

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After posting a year ago about this, I now find I'm getting back into lure fishing :ROFLMAO:
Struggling with time for long, planned sessions so lures it is. Bit more driving but looking forward to visiting some of the old haunts and wondering if they'll be as infuriating as they used to be.
 
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