If you put 2 pike into a lake would they find each other and breed?

Ryanstein

Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2021
Messages
15
I was just wondering "hypothetically"... If you put 2 pike into a lake or even canal system that had ZERO pike to begin with, would they find each other? Presuming this is a healthy breeding couple, could they reproduce if they did manage to seek one another? I just thought of the question since there's a lake near me that has no pike in it supposedly, although I find it hard to believe!
 

Whisker

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Nov 6, 2013
Messages
2,335
Good Q Albert.
My guess is they might well bump into each other; my assumption being they could patrol/hunt in the same areas ie Reed beds or a part of the lake where they’re likely to find their prey.
 

Yuccaman

I like fishing.
Staff member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 17, 2007
Messages
4,495
Depends on the time of year and the size difference. It's not unusual in the slightest for pike to eat each other (I remember reading a study a while ago when arguing with the committee of a club I was in) which found that cannibalism was responsible for about 50% of the mortality of pike within their first 2 years. I've had pike of about 7-8lb attacked on the way in, and the males are certainly more than capable of breeding at that size.

SO... I think I'm saying yes, if they found each other at the right time of year (now) and were in the mood for it, then yes, baby pike could ensue.
 

ukzero1

Growing old disgracefully.
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 3, 2004
Messages
15,242
If there's no Pike in the stretch of water to start with...why would you introduce them? Our club waters don't have Pike in, and no plans to stock them.
 

mickthechippy

space cadet
Staff member
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 23, 2008
Messages
16,158
If there's no Pike in the stretch of water to start with...why would you introduce them? Our club waters don't have Pike in, and no plans to stock them.
having pike or big perch in a water is a boost to the waters eco-system

they keep the fry down, take injured or damaged fish, generally clean out that which would sink to the bottom and decompose

plus they are a good sporting catch
 

ukzero1

Growing old disgracefully.
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 3, 2004
Messages
15,242
having pike or big perch in a water is a boost to the waters eco-system

they keep the fry down, take injured or damaged fish, generally clean out that which would sink to the bottom and decompose

plus they are a good sporting catch
So do the Heron, Cormorants, Mink and Seagulls. Put Pike into the mix and we'd be restocking every couple of years.
 

tipitinmick

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
13,295
Quite a few commercials up here have ONE pike in. To mop up diseased and dying fish I guess. 🤷‍♂️ Whether it works I don’t know.
 

Jimpanzee

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 9, 2020
Messages
252
Slightly off topic but I read an article recently (might have been in the Angling times) that suggested about 10% of fish stocks should be predators. Any less and the risk of diseases and stunted non predators increased hugely. It also results in the right breeding balance too.
 

RedRidingHood

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 10, 2019
Messages
673
Well they'd only need to bump in to each other once while in a rut then go at it like two wild hogs to create a set of fry to further their line. I'd say that given time, it's inevitable they'd breed, especially if you kept adding one singular pike of the sex that dies, when it dies. Natural Lakes and ponds are inevitably stocked over time, given enough time by waterfowl dragging fish eggs from one pond to another so it's not far fetched to assume 2 pike would find one another in a lake or pond. Canals, and stretches of river are probably another based on how far these fish travel, And how long the stretches are.
 

drw

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jun 22, 2008
Messages
738
what about pike changing sex male to female and visa and versa ? And how often can they do it ?
 

Ryanstein

Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2021
Messages
15
having pike or big perch in a water is a boost to the waters eco-system

they keep the fry down, take injured or damaged fish, generally clean out that which would sink to the bottom and decompose

plus they are a good sporting catch
I've never thought of pike like that but that sure does make a lot of sense now I've read and thought about it!
 

Ryanstein

Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2021
Messages
15
The female of the species produces hormones to attract a male, so yes, they would find each other.
As in like a pheromone? I would have imagined they eventually find each other. But it's hard to imagine in vast bodies of water that they ever could
 

Backwoodsman

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
May 1, 2018
Messages
268
Slightly off topic, has anyone eaten a pike. Apparently the French like them, seemingly they make some sort of fish cake with them.
 
Top