How far out to fish

The Landlord

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Just reading one of Des Shipp's facey posts about the Golden Reel final at Larford. He struggled by the sound of it but something got me thinking. He said he decided to start at top 6.
Now I'm assuming he didn't have a feature to fish to, such as lilies etc/ What would dictate how far out you would fish in what was probably open water? Why top 6 instead of top two plus two or three? Is it depth....clean bottom or what?
 

Silverfisher

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Interesting point

I try to fish as close as I can find decent depth and a clear bottom and if it’s a river the right sort of flow. No point going further for your main line than you need to I reckon as just makes things harder for yourself.
 

Neil ofthe nene

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Doesn't he know that you must fish at 16 metres?

Seriously, venue knowledge plays a large part but most commercials tend to be fairly consistent in that there will be a marginal slope of some kind. That, for me can dictate how far out I fish. Normally I would look to fish just past the end of the slope because I believe that is where fish are likely to patrol, particularly if the slope is severe. Not only will food collect here but the fish has one flank protected from predators/danger.

Where there is a gentle slope I might look to fish slightly up that so I am assured of being off any silt that may be collected at the base.

There are also weather conditions to consider. In high winds I will fish closer in for two reasons. First is that I will have better control over the pole and thus float. Second is that a choppy surface will hide you from the fish and thus they can feed more confidently closer in. When it is very cold and calm I will fish longer. This is because setting up, particularly in a match, will scare the fish away from you. Being cold they will move more slowly and thus take longer to come back onto a shorter line and with clearer water are more likely to spook away from you even if they do come closer during the day.

And then, fish being illogical, there are days when none of that logic works.
 
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George Jones

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Neil covers it well above. I would add that if you start less than maximum pole length you still have options if the fish back off. Surprising how many fish get caught short, even in front of nets, especially on big weight venues like The Oaks.
 

Neil ofthe nene

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Neil covers it well above. I would add that if you start less than maximum pole length you still have options if the fish back off. Surprising how many fish get caught short, even in front of nets, especially on big weight venues like The Oaks.
One of the most successful anglers in my club often fishes between his nets. I have had days when half a topkit was far enough.
 

Yosemite Sam

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Just reading one of Des Shipp's facey posts about the Golden Reel final at Larford. He struggled by the sound of it but something got me thinking. He said he decided to start at top 6.
Now I'm assuming he didn't have a feature to fish to, such as lilies etc/ What would dictate how far out you would fish in what was probably open water? Why top 6 instead of top two plus two or three? Is it depth....clean bottom or what?
I’m sure I heard in one of the hourly updates from Jamie Robinson, that it’s very shallow close in , due to the water levels. He was looking for a bit of depth I would think.
 

Lee Richards

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You guarantee that whatever made him decide on the distance he fished, it would not have been a random guess.
It could have been a multitude of reason including what species he is targetting.
Larford has some big Bream shoals and real lunkers so he may have decided to start for Bream, Carp could have been cruising, past contest weights indicated the way to go. etc, etc

Without any information for us to work with it will all be guesswork , but you know that Des would not be guessing.
 
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nejohn

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Personally if there are no obvious features such as weed/lily beds, overhanging trees etc I will look for a change in depth so if I am new to the fishery/peg I will spend some time at the beginning of a session with a plummet and if there is a definite shelf or deeper hole that would be my 1st line of attack
 

NoCarpPlease

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Personally if there are no obvious features such as weed/lily beds, overhanging trees etc I will look for a change in depth so if I am new to the fishery/peg I will spend some time at the beginning of a session with a plummet and if there is a definite shelf or deeper hole that would be my 1st line of attack
Finally someone mentions plummet!!

having said that , I remember fishing an evening match at Terry’s on the Warks Avon back in 1991. as there was very limited time to set up I didn’t bother plumbing up … and proceeded to catch chub after chub to win with 50 pounds odd. When I Did get round to plumbing I discovered that I’d been fishing a couple of foot over depth! Oh well! 😉
 

dumdum

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If you can catch close it’s faster than shipping long distances… and you will often spook fish landing fish that are close, so make the most of the peg in front of you

If the fish back off it may be a case of adding a section and moving with them especially if feeding by hand, where bigger wiser fish will often sit off the back of the shoal

If you start long where do the fish back off too

A match man is always thinking three steps ahead…

Edges are often better longer due to the landing of fish also, so if the fish go left and right from commotion there’s a chance they end up in your edges, especially if it’s somewhere with deep edges like Lindholme for example, I always feed the edges with pellets from the off just to snag the fish who go sideways, and feed them through the match also
 

davylad

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It only takes seconds to get a rough idea of the bottom, and 2' or more laid on used to be the norm on some venues we fished years ago. On a venue I know well, I usually start where the depth starts to level out. I'm not at all interested in fishing down the side for the carp. I was building a weight steadily in the match I fished last Friday, (No carp) but got the feeling it wasn't going to be enough. I added another section and without feeding at all, started getting a fish every put in. To be honest I'm not sure why I did it, but they kept coming until the last hour, when it dried up. It got me a runner up envelope with 52lb.(y)
 

Total

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If you can catch close it’s faster than shipping long distances… and you will often spook fish landing fish that are close, so make the most of the peg in front of you

If the fish back off it may be a case of adding a section and moving with them especially if feeding by hand, where bigger wiser fish will often sit off the back of the shoal

If you start long where do the fish back off too

A match man is always thinking three steps ahead…

Edges are often better longer due to the landing of fish also, so if the fish go left and right from commotion there’s a chance they end up in your edges, especially if it’s somewhere with deep edges like Lindholme for example, I always feed the edges with pellets from the off just to snag the fish who go sideways, and feed them through the match also
^^ Good advice as normal.....Welcome back....;)(y)
 

G0zzer2

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One reason for choosing a particular length is finding a hard bottom rather than a soft bottom. The hard bottom is usually a little shallower than other areas - silt tends to fall into the deeper areas and be brushed off the shallow parts by fish and water action.
 

Zerkalo

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The one time I fished Larford Speci lake for Skimmers the bailiff told me! He said cast just past end of pole line 16m or so! :LOL:(y) Worked for me without any prior venue knowledge, but also the windiest day I've ever fished, was quite a chuck just to reach 16m.
 

JLK

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In contrast to many of the above comments, I've just come back from fishing a two day festival in the Midlands.
To catch on most lakes you had to fish between 5-10 inches deep down the edge keeping your line tight to the float.
Only way to do it right was with a blob float and keeping the pole tip on the bank.
The water was that clear on some of the lakes that you could see the fish in the peg taking your bait and blowing it back out again, hence the need to keep everything tight so they hooked themselves.
Almost the same as fishing for F1s but these were mirror carp that looked like commons. Very strange! 🤷🏻‍♂️
 

Silverfisher

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Finally someone mentions plummet!!
Out of interest how much time and precision do you put into plumbing on a river? I just plumb straight in front of me to get a starting point then again where I think the bait will reach the bottom and then where I think the trot will end then run it through a couple times with a bare hook to try gauge the contours then just set up at what seems like the average depth. No idea if that’s the done thing just seems logical to me.
 

davylad

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Hardly ever bothered plumbing rivers such as the Trent, as long as I had a rough idea. I just tried to picture where the feed would be in the magic area where I was catching, and set the float to that. It might have been mid water one day, and near the bottom on another depending on the conditions.
 

NoCarpPlease

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Out of interest how much time and precision do you put into plumbing on a river? I just plumb straight in front of me to get a starting point then again where I think the bait will reach the bottom and then where I think the trot will end then run it through a couple times with a bare hook to try gauge the contours then just set up at what seems like the average depth. No idea if that’s the done thing just seems logical to me.
Not too much … I’m more careful on the cut 😉

I treat it as a starting point, but an very prepared to change as conditions and the fish dictate.
i do like to sit down on my box for a while and observe the flow and variations before I decide how to tackle a peg. I also like to plumb around to see if there are any significant holes and depth variations That I couldn’t spot by observing the flows.
 
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