How far out do I fish?

Zaknufc

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Evening everyone

I’ve recently joined a club and will be match fishing this year hopefully. I’ve never done it before and want to make sure I have the right tackle. How far out should I be fishing on the pole ? I have an old Maver definition 13M but only 2 Top kits. Is it worth getting universal top kits or get another pole with extra kits but I don’t want to spend the world.
I’ve seen the Preston edge monster for £179.99 and top kits seem reasonably priced but it’s only 10M.
Thanks
 

Maesknoll

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That’s a very open question. Somedays fishing just a topkit will be enough to compete, or necessary to compete, another day 16m or more might be where you need to be. Snake lakes will be different than open water lakes, you’ll need to get to the shallow water across. Pretty much impossible to answer without more detail I ‘m afraid.
 

tipitinmick

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Well, If I was you I’d try and find out where your club matches were going to be held first. Spend a little time gaining some info. Ask the locals what they catch, tactics and bait. If you’ve not been in a match before I’d suggest going on the first two or three just to get a feel for it before throwing serious money at it. You may not like it.

With regards distances. Well that’s an hard one as what a lot of us try to do is find a feature to fish to. Whether it be a drop off or a read bed. Something that the fish feel happy to reside near. This can be as close as a couple of metres on some lakes. This is what you will find if you go do your homework first.

Don’t rush it pal. Take your time and most of all .... enjoy it. Good luck. 👍
 

ukzero1

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Well, If I was you I’d try and find out where your club matches were going to be held first. Spend a little time gaining some info. Ask the locals what they catch, tactics and bait. If you’ve not been in a match before I’d suggest going on the first two or three just to get a feel for it before throwing serious money at it. You may not like it.

With regards distances. Well that’s an hard one as what a lot of us try to do is find a feature to fish to. Whether it be a drop off or a read bed. Something that the fish feel happy to reside near. This can be as close as a couple of metres on some lakes. This is what you will find if you go do your homework first.

Don’t rush it pal. Take your time and most of all .... enjoy it. Good luck. 👍
Just to add to this. Don't ignore the margins, they can bring the odd bonus fish.
 

davylad

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If I was fishing an unknown venue, I'd start by looking for obvious features that might hold fish. If there wasn't anything obvious, I'd plumb it and try and find where it usually levels out, and fish what's known as the bottom of the shelf. These methods don't always produce of course, but you have to start somewhere, unless you can get as much info from locals, then it could be totally different. Oh I'm talking about spring onwards by the way, when the fish start to feed a bit better.
 

Trent_Fisher

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Evening everyone

I’ve recently joined a club and will be match fishing this year hopefully. I’ve never done it before and want to make sure I have the right tackle. How far out should I be fishing on the pole ? I have an old Maver definition 13M but only 2 Top kits. Is it worth getting universal top kits or get another pole with extra kits but I don’t want to spend the world.
I’ve seen the Preston edge monster for £179.99 and top kits seem reasonably priced but it’s only 10M.
Thanks
Very difficult question to give a straight answer to. There are times when you will catch short and others where you will have to fish at distance or to an island to catch the fish.

What you will tend to find, or at least I do is that rotation through various swims throughout the day to stay on the fish is often necessary. I’ve had the odd day where a single line has produced all day but for the most part it will be numerous pole lines at various distances plus a feeder line and maybe even a waggler/pellet waggler line.

In summer particularly you can have some fantastic days fishing the margins or close in. The majority of my best days with my club have been fishing 2+2 or down the edge.
 

2ts

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My advice would be to wait until you have fished a couple of matches to give you an idea of what will be required,your club mates will,no doubt put you right as to decent tackle,and may be able to direct you to a bargain pole,as usually someone will have upgraded.Hope this helps, good luck,and enjoy the whole experience without trying to run before you walk (y)
 

Neil ofthe nene

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First off you may find my blog on the subject of starting match fishing of interest.


Distance. As has been said, this really is something you cannot answer. The simple answer, if there is one, is fish where the fish want to be or are happy to feed. Then it gets complicated, how do you work that out?

A lot will depend on venue. Silvers/natural waters or carp on commercials. As my fishing in recent years has been mainly commercial based I will talk about that.

Assuming we are looking at the warmer months then in my experience you are looking at three areas/styles of fishing. Up in the water, full depth, margins.

Up in the water. Not something I do a lot of and others who do will be able to offer better advice. But most of the time those that are successful with this style will fish at least 10m of pole and normally 13-14. Closer in and the fish just don't seem to settle well. Of course you can fish 14m or further out with a (pellet) waggler.

Full depth. On some venues the regulars know that fishing full depth means fishing as far as your pole allows. This would therefore be 16m for most match anglers. In my experience and on the venues I fish I don't need to fish this far to compete. In fact I find that I can get away with fishing 10/11m max. and often closer. I think it is fair to say that both those I fish with and on this forum know me as someone who rarely fishes beyond this distance. One area not to ignore is the bottom of the near margin slope or shelf. With one rig you can fish at 10m and at the bottom of the slope on many lakes.

Margins. Probably my most successful and reliable line on a commercial in Summer. Some hold that you only fish the margins in the last hour. Again my experience is that on many of the venues I fish I can catch on this line for much of the match. This realisation came upon me gradually as I started by following the last hour advice with success and so gradually started to fish the margin earlier and earlier in the match. My two best match weights (250lb, 217lb) have both been achieved fishing the margins most of the match. But it does not always work. I will though have an early look on this line. By margins I am talking within three foot of the bank to left and right of my peg. On a really good day I can catch using just a topkit. Other times I may want to fish as far along the bank as my 9.5m margin pole will allow. Only by experimenting will you find where the fish are comfortable and also how and what they want fed.

Personally, with two topkits I would look to set up one for fishing at full depth and another for the margins. For your first foray into match fishing keep it simple. Now is not the time to make things complicated. Fish two lines and learn to fish them well. Better that than fishing multiple lines and methods poorly. Yes you may have to wait for the day your approach fits with what the fish want. But the other days are not wasted if you learn something each time you fish.

I would hold off buying a new pole until you have got a year's match fishing under your belt. You can then take time to consider what you want and even if match fishing is for you. Remember that any day out fishing should, first and foremost, be pleasurable. One of the reasons I match fish is not that I am ultra competitive and have to win every time, it is that match fishing takes me to venues I probably would not bother travelling to for a pleasure day. Anything I pick up by way of a brown envelope is a bonus and while I will fish as well as I can it is not the end of the world if I go home empty handed. So I will probably sometimes sacrifice a potential winning peg by fishing in a way that gives me pleasure.

Match fishing brings me friendship, social interaction, banter and probably most important as far as my fishing is concerned a chance to improve and learn from others. In turn this improves my performance both in matches and pleasure sessions.

Yesterday was an example of not needing a long pole nor multiple rigs. I broke the ice on one of my club lakes and started fishing at topkit+4 sections, roughly 10m. I didn't catch until I took a section off and fished closer in. And through the session I used 1 rig.

Good luck and keep asking questions.
 

nejohn

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My advice would be if you are intending to fish matches on a club lake then have a few 'practise' sessions on the lake first taking in a variety of pegs and try to work out what methods work for you, while you are there you could also have a chat with anyone else that was on the bank and see if you could get some advice regarding species methods etc.
If the matches are being held on a commercial water then maybe do the same have a few pleasure sessions first.
When you do actually fish your first match I would suggest that you concentrate on methods that you are comfortable with and get some fish in the net as there is nothing worse than fishing the 'must do' method but are not comfortable or experienced using it then as a consequence not catching. In your 1st few matches it is better to catch something but take notice of what others are doing for future reference than to try a method for the 1st time and catching nothing. It is a case of taking it slowly and learning your venues and just enjoy your time on the bank but don't beat yourself up if you don't do well at first
 

Nunachuk

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I would suggest finding out who the local match fishing stars are in the club, then explain your situation and ask if they mind you watching them when they match fish, (especially in these colder months), as long as you are quiet and sit low to the water, they shouldn't have too many objections. In addition, if you know of any of your mates who has got a sonar device, (Deeper or something like that, long shot I know), then you could ask which pegs get match fished and use the deeper to map the swims out to give you a heads up. Good luck!
 

Ken the Pacman

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The answer to this is that you fish as close as you can to make enough bites to win the match and only experience of the venues you are competing on can tell where that might be and how many bites/fish you might need to win.
 

Simon R

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Let us know where the matches are to be held and it's long odds somebody on here will have fished there previously and can give you a few pointers.

If all your matches are on snake lakes then you're gonna need a long pole to fish the far-bank 'mud line' and the Preston Edge Monster although an awesome bit of kit may not be long enough- plus spare top kits are currently as common as hens teeth - I've had them on order since October.

Simon
 

Neil ofthe nene

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Sorry Simon, I have to disagree about "needing" a long pole on snake/narrow lakes. I do agree that many matches are won fishing long but there are also times when fishing down the track or in the margins can be the winning tactic. There are no certainties in fishing (except that if you haven't got a bait in the water you will never catch).

Add to that our OP does not yet have a long pole I would hesitate before saying they must splash the cash. Better in my opinion to spend some time learning about match fishing, deciding it is for you, before making a serious investment in tackle.
 

Simon R

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Not disagreeing with you Neil but there's nowt worse than watching fish feeding right in front of you and not having the right kit to actually get to them.

Simon
 
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chefster

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Let us know where the matches are to be held and it's long odds somebody on here will have fished there previously and can give you a few pointers.

If all your matches are on snake lakes then you're gonna need a long pole to fish the far-bank 'mud line' and the Preston Edge Monster although an awesome bit of kit may not be long enough- plus spare top kits are currently as common as hens teeth - I've had them on order since October.

Simon
Depends on time of year , in summer most matches are won at 6m shallow on snake lakes, feeding out of your hand, and resting it by fishing down the edges 🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️
 

Millers Thumb

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Zak, with all due respect your post reads "how far out do i fish" tells me you are a complete novice, take on board the advice people are giving you on this forum, some very knowledgable anglers, dont try walking before you can crawl. good luck and welcome to MDs.
 

Neil ofthe nene

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Not disagreeing with you Neil but there's nowt worse than watching fish feeding right in front of you and not having the right kit to actually get to them.

Simon
Agree, I am thinking of our and any novice match angler who for now I believe is best fishing with the kit he has.
 

Zaknufc

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First off you may find my blog on the subject of starting match fishing of interest.


Distance. As has been said, this really is something you cannot answer. The simple answer, if there is one, is fish where the fish want to be or are happy to feed. Then it gets complicated, how do you work that out?

A lot will depend on venue. Silvers/natural waters or carp on commercials. As my fishing in recent years has been mainly commercial based I will talk about that.

Assuming we are looking at the warmer months then in my experience you are looking at three areas/styles of fishing. Up in the water, full depth, margins.

Up in the water. Not something I do a lot of and others who do will be able to offer better advice. But most of the time those that are successful with this style will fish at least 10m of pole and normally 13-14. Closer in and the fish just don't seem to settle well. Of course you can fish 14m or further out with a (pellet) waggler.

Full depth. On some venues the regulars know that fishing full depth means fishing as far as your pole allows. This would therefore be 16m for most match anglers. In my experience and on the venues I fish I don't need to fish this far to compete. In fact I find that I can get away with fishing 10/11m max. and often closer. I think it is fair to say that both those I fish with and on this forum know me as someone who rarely fishes beyond this distance. One area not to ignore is the bottom of the near margin slope or shelf. With one rig you can fish at 10m and at the bottom of the slope on many lakes.

Margins. Probably my most successful and reliable line on a commercial in Summer. Some hold that you only fish the margins in the last hour. Again my experience is that on many of the venues I fish I can catch on this line for much of the match. This realisation came upon me gradually as I started by following the last hour advice with success and so gradually started to fish the margin earlier and earlier in the match. My two best match weights (250lb, 217lb) have both been achieved fishing the margins most of the match. But it does not always work. I will though have an early look on this line. By margins I am talking within three foot of the bank to left and right of my peg. On a really good day I can catch using just a topkit. Other times I may want to fish as far along the bank as my 9.5m margin pole will allow. Only by experimenting will you find where the fish are comfortable and also how and what they want fed.

Personally, with two topkits I would look to set up one for fishing at full depth and another for the margins. For your first foray into match fishing keep it simple. Now is not the time to make things complicated. Fish two lines and learn to fish them well. Better that than fishing multiple lines and methods poorly. Yes you may have to wait for the day your approach fits with what the fish want. But the other days are not wasted if you learn something each time you fish.

I would hold off buying a new pole until you have got a year's match fishing under your belt. You can then take time to consider what you want and even if match fishing is for you. Remember that any day out fishing should, first and foremost, be pleasurable. One of the reasons I match fish is not that I am ultra competitive and have to win every time, it is that match fishing takes me to venues I probably would not bother travelling to for a pleasure day. Anything I pick up by way of a brown envelope is a bonus and while I will fish as well as I can it is not the end of the world if I go home empty handed. So I will probably sometimes sacrifice a potential winning peg by fishing in a way that gives me pleasure.

Match fishing brings me friendship, social interaction, banter and probably most important as far as my fishing is concerned a chance to improve and learn from others. In turn this improves my performance both in matches and pleasure sessions.

Yesterday was an example of not needing a long pole nor multiple rigs. I broke the ice on one of my club lakes and started fishing at topkit+4 sections, roughly 10m. I didn't catch until I took a section off and fished closer in. And through the session I used 1 rig.

Good luck and keep asking questions.
Thanks for taking the time to reply to my thread I appreciate it. I think I will just start out with my current pole and top kits and see how I get on. Like you say I might not even like match fishing so best to try it out first
 
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