Hook-link lengths for feeder fishing.

Rick123

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Has anyone watch the Fishing programme on TV showing feeder hook-links in practice? They attach a hook-link of 3' at first and cast it out, it lands almost beside the feeder. They do this over again, with longer and shorter hook-links and the result is the same. Every time the hook is very close to the feeder, and one time inside it. The conclusion I came to was, its pointless fishing on still waters with a long hook-link like I have always done. My bream rigs were often 3' 4' and I took it for granted it dropped well away form the feeder every-time, especially as I would stop and feather the lead down. Nice to see what others thought of it too?

Had a banging two days fishing, I'll update the blog at the weekend with pictures.
 

Krh57

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Interesting, makes one think about an optimum length for still waters !
 

Northantslad

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Not so sure, if you dab the spool to straighten things out on landing, then rig mechanics and physics will take over. Much depends on the rig set up i suppose, running feeder and a basic standard set up will see it land further away. That said i fish my still water bream hooklengths in an 8 inch loop to the main line and i know one thing even with that more paternostered set up, changing from short (18") to longer hooklengths (36") has never failed me yet and can be almost immediate impact, so must be something in the length change, bit less initial resistance perhaps if as they say the bait landing area isn't changing, as odd as i find that.
 

alsur

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Has anyone watch the Fishing programme on TV showing feeder hook-links in practice? They attach a hook-link of 3' at first and cast it out, it lands almost beside the feeder. They do this over again, with longer and shorter hook-links and the result is the same. Every time the hook is very close to the feeder, and one time inside it. The conclusion I came to was, its pointless fishing on still waters with a long hook-link like I have always done. My bream rigs were often 3' 4' and I took it for granted it dropped well away form the feeder every-time, especially as I would stop and feather the lead down. Nice to see what others thought of it too?

Had a banging two days fishing, I'll update the blog at the weekend with pictures.
There is a lot more to it then where hook falls in relation to feeder, speed of fall of hookbait and resistance felt by fish when initially picking up the bait to name two.
 

PearTree

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It makes sense because on stillwater unless the depth is less than the length of the hook link, as the feeder / lead goes down, the bait, which sinks slower, is going to end up being pulled down directly above the feeder / lead. That’s why we used to then pull the open end feeder back to straighten out the rig and leave the bait in the feed.

Sorry Tommy 😐
 

Silver fan 82

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I'd be more concerned about compromising bite indication with such a long hooklink?
The way I look at it is even if with a long hooklink it all layed lovely and straight on the lake bed (which it never does with a long hooklink) why would you want your hookbait 3 or 4 feet away from your feeder? I'm not saying you won't get bites but in my head I see no real logic to it? 🤷‍♂️ How many bites are not even registering on the tip?
Take the method feeder for example. Love it or hate it, it works really well. A short hooklink presented amongst or very close to the feeder. Fish picks up your hookbait and you have excellent bite indication.
Just my thoughts anyway.
 

Northantslad

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I like the thinking i read recently about bait size (on the hook) and length of hooklength. Watch the birds in the garden, give them crumbs and they keep at it, put a larger piece of bread out and one 'bolts' away with it so it can eat it alone.
 

Zerkalo

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This was the underwater video wasn't it, I think I've seen it, and what interested me as well as where the hook falls, is how far you can move the hook without a bite even registering on the tip.
 

Silver fan 82

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I like the thinking i read recently about bait size (on the hook) and length of hooklength. Watch the birds in the garden, give them crumbs and they keep at it, put a larger piece of bread out and one 'bolts' away with it so it can eat it alone.
Alot of it has to do with how the fish are feeding too. If they are picking up particles of feed and moving a distance to pick up the next one then a longer hooklength may be really useful. But most of the time feeder fishing we clip up, cast accurately and build a bed of feed. So the fish graze over the feed, not moving far ar all between mouthfuls. So it makes sense to me that a shorter hooklink would be advantageous?
 

squimp

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Even using a cage feeder @squimp
If I used a cage feeder these days it would probably be bread fishing on the river and I might stretch to 12 “. The current would help straighten the hooklink out - so it might (!) work as expected.

A rocket style cage on a lake would be back to super short.

I stopped using long hooklinks when fish (tench) started swallowing my hooks on the spot and I got NO indication. That couldn’t continue - so for most Stillwater feeder applications I now fish as short as possible.
 

nutmeg

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Well. You know what I mean. Not a commy as such. 🤣🤣
Indeed mate, l have only fished here, maybe half a dozen times, but have always enjoyed the challenge.
I do think though that there are far too many matches held on there, and the weights pre covid were in general pretty dire for the majority, l get the impression the bream shoals just back off into the unfished half of the venue, and probably return during the ours of darkness to feed.
 

tipitinmick

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Indeed mate, l have only fished here, maybe half a dozen times, but have always enjoyed the challenge.
I do think though that there are far too many matches held on there, and the weights pre covid were in general pretty dire for the majority, l get the impression the bream shoals just back off into the unfished half of the venue, and probably return during the ours of darkness to feed.
Bang on pal. It’s getting some proper abuse at the moment. A 35 pegger was held on Wednesday and I believe three anglers had one bite apiece. 🤷‍♂️
 

rudd

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Fishing for silvers on the drop in deep water requires a long hook length, in these deep venues the undertow also moves a dropping bait away from feeder.
If using a two or three inch feeder link the hooklength just becomes an extension of the main line so bite indication should not be effected.
 

Rick123

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Not so sure, if you dab the spool to straighten things out on landing, then rig mechanics and physics will take over. Much depends on the rig set up i suppose, running feeder and a basic standard set up will see it land further away. That said i fish my still water bream hooklengths in an 8 inch loop to the main line and i know one thing even with that more paternostered set up, changing from short (18") to longer hooklengths (36") has never failed me yet and can be almost immediate impact, so must be something in the length change, bit less initial resistance perhaps if as they say the bait landing area isn't changing, as odd as i find that.
Nope that does not work either, I did mention that in the piece. I think Rob Hughes has done a lot of underwater filming, and this really does open your eyes. We all think that our 30/40/50 hook-link is well away from the feeder, but trust me it ain't mate.
 

Rick123

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If I used a cage feeder these days it would probably be bread fishing on the river and I might stretch to 12 “. The current would help straighten the hooklink out - so it might (!) work as expected.

A rocket style cage on a lake would be back to super short.

I stopped using long hooklinks when fish (tench) started swallowing my hooks on the spot and I got NO indication. That couldn’t continue - so for most Stillwater feeder applications I now fish as short as possible.
If you read the post again, I did say still-waters, not rivers Squimp?
 
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