HELP - River Feeder and Ledger Fishing

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Nov 23, 2020
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Hi all, first post on the forum. Have been loving so many threads, some quality information on here.

I am new to river feeder and ledger fishing, after fishing ponds on the float for many years, and I wondered what I was doing wrong:
The problem - I keep casting a feeder on rivers like the Nidd (Skip Bridge) and Ouse (Fulford, York) and no matter what weight I'm using (1oz, 2oz, 3oz etc), it will not hold bottom.

My set up:

9ft Ron Thompson OTT feeder rod
Daiwa Ninja 3000 Reel
9lb Braid
8lb shock leader (mono)

Would you say my problem is the length and strength of the rod?

Any help/tips/advice would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks chaps
 

NoCarpPlease

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No - the rod should not make that much difference to the ability to hold bottom, although most people fish with 11 to 13 ft length rods on medium to large rivers.

the most thorough book on "match fishing style" ledger and feeder fishing is still Bob Roberts' tome from 30 years ago.
Luckily - he's published a lot of the sections as blogs on his own website

chapter 3 covers the basics of what you're trying to achieve.
It's worth adding that casting out directly in front and feeding out a "downstream bow" of line has the same effect as adding weight to the feeder to achieve "critical balance".
 

Silverfisher

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Sounds like a pretty fast river if you can’t hold bottom with 3oz. Were you still having problems earlier in the season before all the rain?
 
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No - the rod should not make that much difference to the ability to hold bottom, although most people fish with 11 to 13 ft length rods on medium to large rivers.

the most thorough book on "match fishing style" ledger and feeder fishing is still Bob Roberts' tome from 30 years ago.
Luckily - he's published a lot of the sections as blogs on his own website

chapter 3 covers the basics of what you're trying to achieve.
It's worth adding that casting out directly in front and feeding out a "downstream bow" of line has the same effect as adding weight to the feeder to achieve "critical balance".
Thanks very much for this, having a read now
 

rd115

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Feed out a big bow of line will help.

Also don't cast to the other side if you don't need to, more line in the water = more water pushing against the line and will dislodge the lead.

Longer rods pointed up towards the sky like barbel rods on a tripod help to keep the line off the water.

Also this time of year you'll have lots of leaves gathering on the line, sometimes the only solution is a bigger lead.

Finding pegs where you can fish the near side is nice for holding bottom with lighter leads (slack water, creases etc)
 

adriang

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It can be important to get as much line out of the water as possible, hence the reason some 'tip rods' are longer. But not the reason to rush our and buy a new rod, but perhaps experiment with how you have it in the rests.

The idea being to find that balance where the weight will just hold, and keeping as much line from dragging, combined with feeding out a bow in the line, and the actual weigh are the factors.
 
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Thanks guys for all the advice, it is really helpful. Someone is donating me a 12ft rod, so that should help hopefully. I just need to practice letting the feeder land on the bottom and then letting the bow out in the line (if that is the order it is done).
 

NoCarpPlease

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it is ....
basically the tip will spring back as soon as the feeder hits bottom - then immediately start feeding out the bow.

As you get more confident you can feed out the bow whilst the feeder sinks

worth adding that the video that Jasonb posted is quite an extreme example (iirc Jamie is feeding a bow with 10-15 yards of line).
The Wye with 4-5 ft on is a very powerful river - and that looked to me like (at least) 4oz of weight on the feeder!
often 3-6ft of extra line is enough.
 
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