Helicopter Rig

tincatim

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Not something I’ve tried before but with the chance to go fishing this weekend to a local lake that holds some tench, bream and decent roach amongst other things, I’m fancying some feeder fishing. Most of the videos and articles I’ve seen show the helicopter rig being used with a maggot feeder.

My question is does anybody use this rig with a groundbait feeder? I’m looking to single out any tench in there, and I like the bolt effect from the helicopter rig. I’ve got some fake maggots and maggot feeders but just wondered whether an open ended feeder with ground bait, red maggot and chopped worm with corn hook bait would still work using this rig?
 

satinet

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I haven't used ground bait in it but I'm my experience it's not as tangle free as is made out.

You need a sleeve or something on the swivel or the hooklink wraps round the line a lot. YMMV.

I guess if you are gonna use ground bait I'm not sure there's that much advantage over a method feeder with ground bait on it. Guess you can introduce more loose feed particles with a cage feeder though.
 

2lbRoach2hand

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Absolutely this will work mate, especially if distance is required. I would use it quite often for roach and skimmers here in Northern Ireland. The only draw back to using this method for bigger fish is that you will have more hook pulls because you are fighting the fish and the feeder, something that doesn't happen with a sliding set up. If you want more of the "bolt" effect - an alternative is to firstly slide on a float stop, next your swivel, then two more float stops. Twizzle about 6" of line. Tie just an overhand knot at the top of the twizzle and again at the bottom to secure the loop so it doesn't get too small (to which you attach your hooklength loop to loop). Cut the loose tag leaving about 2mm and bring two of the float stops down to rest on the knot of the twizzled section. You can then adjust the float stop above your swivel to a couple of inches above the swivel. What this basically does is give you the bolt effect without playing the fish tight on a feeder!
 

tincatim

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Absolutely this will work mate, especially if distance is required. I would use it quite often for roach and skimmers here in Northern Ireland. The only draw back to using this method for bigger fish is that you will have more hook pulls because you are fighting the fish and the feeder, something that doesn't happen with a sliding set up. If you want more of the "bolt" effect - an alternative is to firstly slide on a float stop, next your swivel, then two more float stops. Twizzle about 6" of line. Tie just an overhand knot at the top of the twizzle and again at the bottom to secure the loop so it doesn't get too small (to which you attach your hooklength loop to loop). Cut the loose tag leaving about 2mm and bring two of the float stops down to rest on the knot of the twizzled section. You can then adjust the float stop above your swivel to a couple of inches above the swivel. What this basically does is give you the bolt effect without playing the fish tight on a feeder!
Thanks and that set up makes sense.

It’s quite deep water that I’ll be fishing so the method is a no go. I’m looking to get a decent bed of bait down with plenty of particles and just looking at trying something different rig wise.

I guess if you are gonna use ground bait I'm not sure there's that much advantage over a method feeder with ground bait on it. Guess you can introduce more loose feed particles with a cage feeder though.
Thanks for your replies.
 

satinet

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The rig does work well for bream and tench in my experience. Didn't find it really got many hook ups with small roach though.
 

tincatim

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The rig does work well for bream and tench in my experience. Didn't find it really got many hook ups with small roach though.
That suits me then. If I can avoid the small fish I’ll be happy. Not that I don’t appreciate small fish, just that they’re not in Saturday’s plans.
 

2lbRoach2hand

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Depth wise the helicopter or any rig is fine. If you are looking to introduce a good bed of feed in deeper water, go for a completely solid open ended feeder with no holes to get it on the deck, however it's always good to introduce some with a cage to get a stream of fish attracting particles going through the water column. This sort of fishing in deep water is my bread and butter feeder fishing over here. Last Wednesday I used the same set up to fish the airport section on Lough Erne in 22feet of water at 53 meters. I would suggest using braid and a shock leader if there is depth. If big fish are the target, then enough leader to put about 3 turns on the reel. The water you speak of sounds like the sort of thing I was doing - only for hybrids to over 4lb! Check out -
 

Lee Richards

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The helicopter method/cage feeder is my go to for all stillwater rigs and over the past few seasons we have been experimenting using it for Barbel on the Lower Severn.
It's caught plenty of fish and there has definitely been less tangles.
 

R0B

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Yep, I use them all the time with cage feeders of differing sizes. It's been successful on a hard water whilst others have remained fish-less, so I must be doing something half right for a change. The ready heli rigs don't seem to tangle if you have them pushed up tight enough. Whatever you use, as long as you've got a tapered sleeve and tight enough stops.
 

tincatim

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If I can get some of those Korum heli rigs I’ll use them but I’ve got plenty of anti tangle sleeves, swivels and line stops to make my own if not. Looking forward to trying something new on a lake I’ve only fished once before.
 
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