Hairy Arsed Old Gits ?

Barbelcatcher

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halfpennies,
pennies,
Sixpence,
Shilling (with Victoria on) - 95% silver
florin
half-crowns.

Everyday change - 3d pocket money if you were lucky.
My cheapest beer 1s/4d pint, somewhere in Manchester as we were crossing to go to Blackpool for a week. Normally about 1s/10d in our local. (Funny how things stick in your mind)
 

Barbelcatcher

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The smell of Newark Sugar beet factory as it was processing its first beet - many hated it - I like it. Could smell it occasionlly in the village I lived some 8 miles away, if the wind was right.
 

Flathead

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The smell of Newark Sugar beet factory as it was processing its first beet - many hated it - I like it. Could smell it occasionlly in the village I lived some 8 miles away, if the wind was right.
....and you get your line covered in ‘snot’ when it is in the water:eek:
 

banksy

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Jobs as a kid:

Sugar-beet singling;
Potato picking
Picking and upending sheafs of corn after being cut and roped by the baler. stacking the sheaf's together as a stook
Helping to load sheafs onto flat bedded carriage, pulled by grey fergie, and having to assist & push said load up a hill - there used to be about 6 of us pushing. (Looked at the hill some 10 years ago - and it was only a slight incline)
Cutting up Mangolds as feed in machines like this.
Stock Photo - . Carrots, mangold wurtzels and sugar beets. Carrots; Sugar beet; Mangel-wurzel. 58 CARROTS, MANGOLDS AND SUGAR BEETS.. AMES CUTTER. as they are more apt This machine is

How many do you remember Mr Banks

We had two reaper binders, still remember the things breaking down all the time.
Stooking the shavs (sheaves), then forking them onto rulleys with gormers fore and aft.
The stackyard absolutely rammed with stacks, waiting for the contractor's threshing machine to arrive in winter.
The Allis Chalmers threshing machine was powered by a long canvas belt attached to a pulley on a Field Marshall single cylinder tractor - a "pop-pop tractor" to us kids. The "pickers" standing on the stacks, forking the sheaves across to the man on the threshing machine, all had their trouser legs tied up with band, to keep out the rats and mice which had built their nests in the stack.

Our first combine was a Massey Harris. It seems crazy now, but the corn was collected in 12 stone hessian sacks, which were then slid down a chute onto the ground. They then had to be collected and lifted by hand to be brought back to the farm, where my father took them on his shoulders and climbed a 10' ladder to transfer then to the first floor granary. All day.
The advent of bulk grain storage changed everything, including the number of farm workers, from seven down to two.
At least the two remaining shire horses were not sent to the knackers yard, as so may were. Tidy and Dusty lived out their days in the back paddock.
 

160642fishing

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We had two reaper binders, still remember the things breaking down all the time.
Stooking the shavs (sheaves), then forking them onto rulleys with gormers fore and aft.
The stackyard absolutely rammed with stacks, waiting for the contractor's threshing machine to arrive in winter.
The Allis Chalmers threshing machine was powered by a long canvas belt attached to a pulley on a Field Marshall single cylinder tractor - a "pop-pop tractor" to us kids. The "pickers" standing on the stacks, forking the sheaves across to the man on the threshing machine, all had their trouser legs tied up with band, to keep out the rats and mice which had built their nests in the stack.

Our first combine was a Massey Harris. It seems crazy now, but the corn was collected in 12 stone hessian sacks, which were then slid down a chute onto the ground. They then had to be collected and lifted by hand to be brought back to the farm, where my father took them on his shoulders and climbed a 10' ladder to transfer then to the first floor granary. All day.
The advent of bulk grain storage changed everything, including the number of farm workers, from seven down to two.
At least the two remaining shire horses were not sent to the knackers yard, as so may were. Tidy and Dusty lived out their days in the back paddock.
'Stooking the shavs (sheaves), then forking them onto rulleys with gormers fore and aft'

For the benefit of those of us who speak English what the f*** are you talking about.o_Oo_O
 

Barbelcatcher

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David, will explain the finer points, for the townies - whilst I can remember (just) thrashing machines, I cannot remember my grandfathers binder being pulled by horses. The pitchfork, got its name because the sheaves of wheat had to be pitched onto the carriage.

reaping and Baling.jpg
cart and horse.jpg

THrashing Machine.jpg

Favourite time for terriers - as Rats and Mice hurried out of the stacks.
 

Alantherose

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Nov 26, 2019
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The Alpine man.
Bloke driving a big flat-bed truck with crates of Alpine pop (Lime, Dandelion & Burdock, Cream Soda etc) that used to come down our street fortnightly.
 
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