Groundbaiting

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rob27

peg nine
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Jan 27, 2002
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hi,
Right, i'll start by giving you an example, bear with me!!
Fishing a canal today i had a lot of bites I put in some mashed bread first off and used bread on the hook. Then I decied after about 2 hours(for no other reason than a 'feeling')not to put any more mashed bread in. And I still had the same amount of bites. My question is how do you gauge how much to put in. Do you keep putting groundbait in until you don't get any bites then cut back? or do you put a little in then if catching a lot put more and if catching nothing put less in? If you are catching a lot - then why put more in, better to leave it as it is? I have heard the phrase little and often - but does this apply when you have got loads of fish in front of you and does it apply when you are not catching and in the latter circumstance should you feed less or more? Sorry for the multiple q's and long winded q.
Thanks
 

Steve

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Aug 28, 2002
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Unfortunately I think the answer is it depends.
If using a cloud attractor with little substance to it, putting too much in (unless you are scaring them off with a blitz attack) is less of an issue but if using something like bread mash or loose feed apart from initially, when you might like to let the fish know you have arrived, I prefer little and often for a number of reasons.
Firstly, if for some reason the fish arn't there or don't want to feed due to reasons beyond your control, piling a lot of feed in is costly and a polution risk. Secondly, one of the main benefits of feeding little and often is it creates competition between the fish and makes the bites very positive. Finally if you fill them up with loose feed they will leave your bait alone.
Having said all that, it's only my view and I'm not a fish, although my wife thinks I'm having an afair with one.icon_smile_big.gif
 

Trogg

the bouncer
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Steve

if the "fish" happens to be Darryl Hannah (remember splash?) then i'm really really jelous icon_smile_wink.gif

As for groundbaiting i would suggest asking the master himself.....Dave aka watchmefillthelakewith500lbofgrounbait&walkouttogetthecarp icon_smile_big.gif



Alan

I'll have a fiver on the black un
 

Dave

Red Leader
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OI TROGGY icon_smile_big.gif

But seeing you asked nicely lol,


Groundbait - you either love it or hate it I was once told. You'll have noticed several well known matchman, past and present, always start off with a half dozen balls of groundbait before even wetting a line.
To some this, and often does, scare the fish from the peg but there is a little method in the madness.
Firstly when everyone has trapsed up and down the bank before the start the fish can often become wary so will the splashing of a few balls make any difference - I dunno icon_smile.gif
Secondly, and this is where the logic does come in, once the fish settle back down, there is a carpet of feed/attractant there in your swim which is not only to attract them but is thee to hold them in front of you.
If you manage to get them feeding then a ball about the size of a table tennis ball each cast should maintain that hold and will not spook them as they become to accept the splash with food.

If after an hour from launching the first six balls you cannot get a bite and it seems that the fish are no where to be had, try this:
Mix a light mix of groundbait, almost dry and put out a couple of balls over your original spot. These should break up the minute they hit the water and form a slow sinking, wide spreading cloud that should attract even attention of most fish. In this add a couple of th original mix balls to 'freshen' the feed on the bottom.

Again if this works then resort to the table tennis sized ball per cast. The danger in all this is overfeeding the fish in the swim so gauge the amount by the response.

If after all this you still cannot get a bite then try feeding loose feed away from area and see if you can pick up a fish or two. If so and you start to get a few bites, as you feed try to bring the fish over the groundbaited area by introducing the loose feed closer and closer to that area.

Some fisheries will not allow the use of groundbait other than by feeder or cup so please check first.

How do you throw your balls in (icon_smile_big.gif - Groundbait lol) ?

The common mistake when launching a ball of groundbait is to throw it too low so that the ball hits the surface at an angle. This causes maximum disturbance and often leads to the ball breaking up prematurely.
When throwing a ball in, use an underhand swing and aim to get the ball up into the air so that it falls vertically into the water. Practice makes perfect but ideally the ball should be thrown at around 45 degrees to the surface and when it runs out of momentum it should enter the water with very little in the way of splashing.
Practice to get consistancy with your throw as you want all the balls to land closely together and not widespread as this will defeat the purpose.

Long distances can be acheived with the underhand 'chuck', again launch at 45 degrees but before doing so, wet your hands and smooth the outside of the ball, effectively glazing it. This helps it to stay together as you 'chuck' it.

Have fun icon_smile.gif

Dave
 
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