Groundbait, groundbait, groundbait - is it for the angler or the fish?

rudd

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That’s not even classed as groundbait 🤷‍♂️
How so?

Molehill is a non feed groundbait, would also class liquid feeds as groundbait.
Would you not class groundbait as any attractant that cannot be fished on a hook and anything that can put on a hook as loose feed?
 

grey

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I'd say generally the most important aspects of GB in order are:
cost
coarse/fine texture
feed content
inert/life in it
fishmeal/sweet
colour/tone
other flavours

There are times I'd alter the order, such as for bream where I'd elevate the importance of it being inert and whether to use fishmeal or sweet, and there are venues I fish where dark or green GB clearly out-fishes any other tone or colour.

If I'm honest, other flavours are rarely a consideration for me nowadays - I think I've passed my stage of experimenting with every flavour without reaching any conclusion whatsoever.
 

chefster

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How so?

Molehill is a non feed groundbait, would also class liquid feeds as groundbait.
Would you not class groundbait as any attractant that cannot be fished on a hook and anything that can put on a hook as loose feed?
Well I wouldn’t class liquid as groundbait!! I’d class it as an attractant... I class soil as soil, when I use worm slop, yes the soil is a carrier and a cloud of attractant, but I don’t call it groundbait 🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️I class groundbait as something they can actually eat
 

Simon R

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Precisely my thoughts on riddling. I honestly can’t see the point. I’ll get shot down for saying this but I also don’t understand why you need an electric drill and a whisk. It’s not that hard mixing it with your hands is it? Or do matchmen mix five or six bags at a time?
The first time you need to mix a bucketful of groundbait you'll discover exactly why drills and whisks are used.

Mixing say half a VDE/Sensas (other buckets are available :p) bucket of just plain brown crumb by hand will probably take 10-15 minutes - and even then you'll get dry bits and lumps. Use a cordless drill and a whisk it'll take about five minutes tops and result in a light. fluffy mix with no lumps and an even consistency - and it doesn't need riddling(y)

I was sceptical until I used one for the first time.

I don't bother using one for small quantities of groundbait there's no real time saving and I can get a perfectly acceptable mix with my hands.

Simon
 

rudd

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Well I wouldn’t class liquid as groundbait!! I’d class it as an attractant... I class soil as soil, when I use worm slop, yes the soil is a carrier and a cloud of attractant, but I don’t call it groundbait 🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️I class groundbait as something they can actually eat
Hence the word ground bait or does it mean ground-bait or even both?

A ground up bait designed to carpet the ground being fished to attract fish.

Does anyone know?
 

Lee Richards

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@bluemack
18 or 24" hook length and pack some of the line into the ball to make the cast easier.
If using the pellet the bait/line will move away from the ball and the ball break off will settle around the bait.

Be great on the Avon and could see it working well at Bidford or Fladbury
 

The one and only Harvey

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I once outfished a mate with my homemade groundbait, consisting of a mix of white and brown breadcrumbs and some boiled hemp. He had all things Sensas to his disposal, but sitting side by side, I was the one who landed fish. We both used sweetcorn as hookbait.
 

Markywhizz

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The first time you need to mix a bucketful of groundbait you'll discover exactly why drills and whisks are used.

Mixing say half a VDE/Sensas (other buckets are available :p) bucket of just plain brown crumb by hand will probably take 10-15 minutes - and even then you'll get dry bits and lumps. Use a cordless drill and a whisk it'll take about five minutes tops and result in a light. fluffy mix with no lumps and an even consistency - and it doesn't need riddling(y)

I was sceptical until I used one for the first time.

I don't bother using one for small quantities of groundbait there's no real time saving and I can get a perfectly acceptable mix with my hands.

Simon
Thanks for explaining that. I don’t fish for five hours at a time so I don’t mix bucket loads. I’m sure you are right though.
 

nejohn

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I don't use ground bait very often as I prefer to loose feed if possible, however when I do it will be combination of probably 3 ground baits mixed in varying quantities with some white or brown crumb, crushed hemp and loose feed. My ground bait shelf in the shed only has VDE super cup, Sensas Lake and a green one (forgotten what that one is) and a couple of bags of crumb and crushed hemp. I don't tend to mix large amounts so mixing by hand suits me, but I do have a local water where you do need a lot of ground bait, I haven't fished it for about 4 years but if I go again I will definitely include a cordless drill in my kit. For me it is a case of judging what you need on the day consistency wise and mixing to suit, unfortunately I am not a great judge of what I might need so only make manageable amounts up at a time as I have a tendency to always air on the sloppy side and end up adding more mix.
I agree that there seems to be more and more bags of ground bait varieties in the shops every time I go and to a degree are probably designed to catch fishermen as well as catch fish, but like a lot of things in life you will always get those that will always be looking for something new and also those that are happy to stick with the tried and tested so for me it is more of a confidence thing if you are happy with what you are doing and don't feel the need to change then don't but if you want to try other things then nothing wrong with that either. Personally I just try to make my fishing fairly simple and concentrate on doing what I do as best I can and enjoying my time on the bank, if I was getting stressed about not having the right ground bait mix, rod, float, bait etc then I think it would be time for me to hang up the rods and find something else to do with my spare time
 

JayBee

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Okay, I've got itchy fingers this evening, starting to get pre day's fishing excited even though it's a few days away yet - bet i don't sleep tonight now :D

But, anyway, I've just been milling around the online stores looking at groundbait - I know what I wanted but was absolutely taken aback at the amount and variety of groundbait available now - one store alone boasted some 115 different types of groundbait!


To me there was always fishmeal based and non-fishmeal based, natural colour or dark/black, but now it seems you can get every flavour and colour under the sun.
I thought, simples, a bag of Sensas Roach & Silver fish, but now I'm bamboozled with more options than I'd know what to do with :D

Is groundbait to catch fish or is it to catch the angler? Are we going down the Boilie path with Groundbait?
Well, ...The pork pie flavoured, perhaps with a hint of brown sauce, has been known to appeal to the chubbier specimens.
 

rudd

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The first time you need to mix a bucketful of groundbait you'll discover exactly why drills and whisks are used.

Mixing say half a VDE/Sensas (other buckets are available :p) bucket of just plain brown crumb by hand will probably take 10-15 minutes - and even then you'll get dry bits and lumps. Use a cordless drill and a whisk it'll take about five minutes tops and result in a light. fluffy mix with no lumps and an even consistency - and it doesn't need riddling(y)

I was sceptical until I used one for the first time.

I don't bother using one for small quantities of groundbait there's no real time saving and I can get a perfectly acceptable mix with my hands.

Simon
Mixing by hand gives my right arm an alternative work out












from using the remote 😜😜😜😜😜
 

baggy

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I laugh my socks off when I see this.

The absolute worst thing I ever saw on a video involving groundbait prep was from an angler I can't remember. An eager wannabe really, though I think he was somehow sponsored.

After mixing his groundbait and riddling off everything but the lumps, he explains that he won't ever push the lumps through the riddle because these are "impurities"......(!!!!!???!!!!!!!????!!!). Just chucked it all away instead.

Every day for about the past 10 years I've thought about this guy and how much I just want to punch him in the face.

Now, where's that thread about being mental?
I dry riddle my groundbait in the winter especially if it has a high food content like Tom Thick black (Old thatchers black) as there is lots of bits of pellet. It’s the same with So Simple BMG. 🤷‍♂️
 

Ben Field

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I dry riddle my groundbait in the winter especially if it has a high food content like Tom Thick black (Old thatchers black) as there is lots of bits of pellet. It’s the same with So Simple BMG. 🤷‍♂️
I think to have been fair I should have expanded a bit. If you know the groundbaits you like and are decisively sticking with them, adapting them to suit your needs makes sense. I don't think there's much harm with stronger fishmeal baits either, since so much of the contents are just varying grounds of the same thing. On the other side, I've seen a lot of guys who are deciding to immediately sieve baits they're not even familiar with, and you can't help question why they didn't buy a finer one in the first place 👍
 

mickthechippy

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I think to have been fair I should have expanded a bit. If you know the groundbaits you like and are decisively sticking with them, adapting them to suit your needs makes sense. I don't think there's much harm with stronger fishmeal baits either, since so much of the contents are just varying grounds of the same thing. On the other side, I've seen a lot of guys who are deciding to immediately sieve baits they're not even familiar with, and you can't help question why they didn't buy a finer one in the first place 👍
marukyu, gave you the choice of a fine and a coarse mix with the same groundbait

usually, the GB number was (say) 160 for the fine mix and 161 was for the coarser mix

both grades had thier uses
 

dave brittain 1

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How so?

Molehill is a non feed groundbait, would also class liquid feeds as groundbait.
Would you not class groundbait as any attractant that cannot be fished on a hook and anything that can put on a hook as loose feed?
Mole hill soil comes into the same category as leam and gravel, categorised as ballast or binder with the single purpose of getting the groundbait down although leam in powder form is also used to separate joker.

Liquids as Chefster has stated are bait boosters/attractants, again by their nature not classed as groundbait.

Ground bait is exactly that, a ground bait, biscuit, dried bread, coconut, molasses, pigeon droppings, fishmeal, hemp, potato flakes, bran, maize, etc.

As well as liquids there are other attractants, such as various spices, coco, custard powder, cork powder, glycerine etc. Like groundbait the list is endless.
 

Ben Field

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marukyu, gave you the choice of a fine and a coarse mix with the same groundbait

usually, the GB number was (say) 160 for the fine mix and 161 was for the coarser mix

both grades had thier uses
Definitely. I liked the Marukyu stuff I used. Nice touch that. Similar to some of the Sensas ones too, with standard, fine and dark versions of the same mixes. Certainly with Lake, Gros Gardons etc.

My main fear for anybody trying a new bait and getting carried away with the sieve is that often, some of the sweeter, binding particles can be taken out, totally changing the stickiness of a mix. So although you create a finer mix, it can end up quite different in all respects to where you started. (Traditional silverfish mixes using biscuit bases rather than bread)
 
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mickthechippy

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One mixer I havent seen or used for ages

is cake crumb,

I used to get it in big bags from the local bakery, they were only to happy to get rid of it along with the unsold out of date bread that my grandad picked up as swill for the pigs
 
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