Going to give Pellet Waggler fishing a try...

Nasha

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You can re use them ,make a loop or use the loop thing they came on thread your line through and hold tight and push them back on. I leave them on the setup and take the float off ready for next time .
I've tried this before, with limited success. From memory the only way I got them back on was tying the line to the wire thing with the smallest knot possible and pushing them over that but I thought doing that a couple of times would have made the stops looser.
I don't have the patience when packing away so I often find them going in the bin bag these days.
 

CarpCatcher86

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I don’t do any of this type of fishing. Do loaded wagglers dive more than unloaded, as you have to put a certain amount of shot around the float to cast to the desired distance. I would have thought it wouldn’t have made that much difference.
It works the same with all wagglers. If you have to put more shot round the float as you do with unloaded wagglers, it creates more resistance when entering the water, stopping the float diving as deep. It works similar to the way the dive discs work on the pellet wagglers.
 

Yosemite Sam

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It works the same with all wagglers. If you have to put more shot round the float as you do with unloaded wagglers, it creates more resistance when entering the water, stopping the float diving as deep. It works similar to the way the dive discs work on the pellet wagglers.
Ok , so your saying a loaded waggler is more streamlined and dives more. Makes sense, but is there that much difference.
 

Nasha

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Does a loaded wag with a dive disc cause more commotion on entering the water than an unloaded wag locked on the line with shot?
 

dave brittain 1

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When you cast a pellet waggler loaded with shot when you feather it the float folds hitting the water flat creating a slap and braking motion in one which stops the float diving so the float is fishing almost instantly. The majority of loaded floats, particularly the early ones with a single ball weights dive and as such aren't fishing instantly. The ones with a disc cushion the dive but lack the finesse of a shotted float and don't always cast well.

Shotted floats are also better for working the bait in the water so for me I only use loaded floats when fishing at long range 40m + where distance is the objective, not finesse.

While the above may only be small differences, for me having fished the method a lot over the years, it makes all the difference between putting a few extra fish in the net however others may have different views so find what works for you.
 

CarpCatcher86

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When you cast a pellet waggler loaded with shot when you feather it the float folds hitting the water flat creating a slap and braking motion in one which stops the float diving so the float is fishing almost instantly. The majority of loaded floats, particularly the early ones with a single ball weights dive and as such aren't fishing instantly. The ones with a disc cushion the dive but lack the finesse of a shotted float and don't always cast well.

Shotted floats are also better for working the bait in the water so for me I only use loaded floats when fishing at long range 40m + where distance is the objective, not finesse.

While the above may only be small differences, for me having fished the method a lot over the years, it makes all the difference between putting a few extra fish in the net however others may have different views so find what works for you.
I don't understand what you mean by working the bait. Obviously you can change shot down the line or use none at all in order how fast or slow you want the bait to fall, other than that I'm a little lost.
 

robert d

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When you cast a pellet waggler loaded with shot when you feather it the float folds hitting the water flat creating a slap and braking motion in one which stops the float diving so the float is fishing almost instantly. The majority of loaded floats, particularly the early ones with a single ball weights dive and as such aren't fishing instantly. The ones with a disc cushion the dive but lack the finesse of a shotted float and don't always cast well.

Shotted floats are also better for working the bait in the water so for me I only use loaded floats when fishing at long range 40m + where distance is the objective, not finesse.

While the above may only be small differences, for me having fished the method a lot over the years, it makes all the difference between putting a few extra fish in the net however others may have different views so find what works for you.
What floats do you reccomend to use upto 40m that you can get today
 

dave brittain 1

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I don't understand what you mean by working the bait. Obviously you can change shot down the line or use none at all in order how fast or slow you want the bait to fall, other than that I'm a little lost
Feed then cast into the feed but don't sink your line. If you don't get a bite within a minute re-feed but when you go to move the bait, don't twitch it, lift the rod tip up drawing the float towards you. With a shotted float the float folds and you are drawing the lead to the surface and the bait will follow. When you have drawn the float into the feed the bait falls naturally. Because you are using a shotted slim float you get a touch more finesse and for me this and the other aspects mentioned including casting straight and not entering the water like a feeder, give a shotted float a distinct advantage particularly if you are casting tight to an island as they track straight, whereas some flighted floats including the styro flighted Gurus sometimes arc off to the left or right.

Personally I use either my own styro wagglers which have a piece of cane running through them or the Drake wagglers.
 

CarpCatcher86

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Feed then cast into the feed but don't sink your line. If you don't get a bite within a minute re-feed but when you go to move the bait, don't twitch it, lift the rod tip up drawing the float towards you. With a shotted float the float folds and you are drawing the lead to the surface and the bait will follow. When you have drawn the float into the feed the bait falls naturally. Because you are using a shotted slim float you get a touch more finesse and for me this and the other aspects mentioned including casting straight and not entering the water like a feeder, give a shotted float a distinct advantage particularly if you are casting tight to an island as they track straight, whereas some flighted floats including the styro flighted Gurus sometimes arc off to the left or right.

Personally I use either my own styro wagglers which have a piece of cane running through them or the Drake wagglers.
Thanks buddy. Still looking for advice on the rods. I have a 12ft pellet waggler rod with a 20 gram max casting weight in mind for £140. Or a 12ft carp waggler rod with a max casting weight of 10-30 grams for £125. Having said that the power float rod I currently have has a max casting weight of 20 grams. Currently this particular rod has handled carp to 16lbs.
 
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