Getting used to a rod

Zerkalo

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How long does it take you to get used to using a rod or pole?

For me most rods I've bought can get a feel of pretty much straight away. I loved my Greys TXL Twin Tip straight away. Knew instantly that my 16' Shakespeare Agility 2 was a nice rod for Chub. That being said, my older rods like my Shakespeare Avon I've caught so many fish on over the years I can really give it some 'stick' for want of a better word without much of a care.

One rod that took much longer was my 12' Tricast Excellence Waggler rod. At first it seemed to make noises when playing bigger fish, very through actioned, but with a bit of power, yet also light enough for smaller fish. I have finally felt like on the last session I had that I've got used to it. It's perfect for big Roach and Crucians but as I was playing a 13lb 4oz Carp, my dad asked me "how's the rod?" to which I replied, "spot on, I love this rod".

A rod I have I still feel I need to get a feel of is my 17' Acolyte. Only had Perch on it so far. It's incredibly light in the hand, feels like you're using a 13' rod, but also feels like a very specialist tool for silverfish. Need to hook a few dog Chub on it to build up any confidence in using it.

I have a feeling my 12' Tricast Long Range feeder rod will be one that I take to straight away when I use it in a couple of weeks time.
 

Sam Vimes

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My experience would suggest that people tend to struggle with anything that they might consider extreme. Really long or short, really through actioned or tip actioned, really powerful or really soft, rods are all likely to provoke negative reactions for some folks. Much depends on what they have experience of.

Now that commercial fisheries are so popular, relatively short (12' and less), and powerful float rods are many folks go to rod. Not surprisingly, they tend to find 13'(+), and less powerful, rods rather strange.

How long it might take to get used to something else largely depends on how often an individual might fish with the rod in question and how long it takes for them to give it a good work out with decent fish.

One rod that took much longer was my 12' Tricast Excellence Waggler rod. At first it seemed to make noises when playing bigger fish,
I've had similar with Tri-Cast rods. I've tended to put it down to the Seymo rings that Tri-Cast tend to use.
 

Zerkalo

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That makes a lot of sense as the Tricast Excellence rod is the most through actioned rod I've used, which is comparatively not that many, other than a cheap Shakespeare Mach 1 which was like jelly, the Tricast seems to be a more refined through action once I have got used to it.
 

Rigmann

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My definition of getting familiar with a rod is when you just concentrate on your fishing then your used to that rod
 

R0B

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3 minutes, approximately.
I suppose it helps having fished with everything from beachcasters to poles, from 5ft BFS rods to 12 foot pike rods, from fly rods to whips and everything else in between in all materials, glass, cane, carbon, boron* for the last 36 years. I think the only rod I haven't used would be big telescopic bolo rod type thing.


*and I've blanked with them all at some point :LOL:
 

Total

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@Zerkalo ........Did you ever get another section sorted for that 16 foot Shakespeare rod that was 'shortened' for you or get another identical rod?:unsure:
 

tipitinmick

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Picked a Matrix Horizon XC class 13’ 80g up this morning. Hoping to give it some welly this week so will let you know then. My reckoning is .... two casts. 🤣🤣
 

nejohn

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I can usually tell within a few minutes of using it in anger
 

Zerkalo

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I usually take to a rod straight especially away if I like it. Think it was just the Tricast Excellence that took me a while.
 

OldTaff

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Doesn’t take me long at all - I’ve fished with so many rods and poles over the years that I get a feel for a setup really quickly.

Picked up a bargain Friday - Drennan 11’ Red Range pellet waggler (tenner on eBay) and tried it out yesterday evening with one of the new Preston Precision 2g pellet wagglers, Cadence 3000 and 4lb Guru Pulse. After just 4 casts I was on my spot time and time again and the rod felt amazing in my hands.

As the carp are still spawning I wasn't looking to catch but did pick up a surprise 3lb common that was easily tamed with the setup.
 

rudd

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3 minutes, approximately.
I suppose it helps having fished with everything from beachcasters to poles, from 5ft BFS rods to 12 foot pike rods, from fly rods to whips and everything else in between in all materials, glass, cane, carbon, boron* for the last 36 years. I think the only rod I haven't used would be big telescopic bolo rod type thing.


*and I've blanked with them all at some point :LOL:
Same but some beach casting rods I have struggled with.
 

Deejay8

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I get used to using good rods fairly quickly. If I hook a big fish, I pay attention to how the rod feels and take it easy and if it doesn't feel up to it, back off the pressure. If it feels ok, I give it a little more stick, but not too much. Just enough to assess how it feels. You can usually tell when a rod is struggling or approaching it's limit. It's a case of testing the rod to a reasonable level beyond it's normal use. But not being unrealistic and using the wrong type of rod for your target. A bad rod, feels bad and you might get better at handling it, but it won't ever feel truly natural, and you will always notice it's deficiencies.
 

Silver fan 82

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I think if your whole set up is nicely balanced then not too long. If everything from rod, reel, line and terminal tackle is nicely balanced then you know don't you?
 

Markywhizz

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I tend to either get on with a rod straight away or not at all. I had a Series Seven puddle chucker I just didn’t get on with at all, also a Preston mini carp, which surprised me as I was really looking forward to using it. Garbolino and Maver rods I tend to just get a feel for straight away. The first feeder rod I fell in love with was a 9ft reactorlite. It just felt right immediately.
 

Zerkalo

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I'm always keen to hear from other people that have used the same rods, but quite often people won't share the same view. Everyone else seemed to love the Excellence instantly, it took me probably 10 sessions to really take to the feel of it.

I have misused rods for whatever reason, just on holiday messabouts. Take for example my 10' Guru N-Gauge Feeder... I used that on a reservoir for Bream so you could have said my tackle was unbalanced but I still did two 100b weights of Bream on it. I didn't know if the rod was any good for what I bought it for, small chucks on commercials, until I used it for that as a 5lb Bream is a surprisingly sluggish fighter.

I took to using long rods instantly, but I'm pretty much done with buying new ones now I have a light, medium and heavier 16'+ rods. The only rod I really want now is a 14' Cadence no3, I just have the feeling it will be what I want and I haven't done too badly so far using gut instinct.

Some of my rods aren't quite as good as the others, the Shakespeare Agility 2 for instance, it's not a high end rod, but I love it for its heavy action for Chub. The Mach 1 is one of the only rods I've used recently that I've really disliked, but then again that is a budget rod so doesn't surprise me. Mach 3 is a different beast.
 

R0B

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I think rods are only hard work if you're using them outside their target range/usage. Which we've probably all done. Last time I used the "wrong" rod I took a 9ft tip rod for roving on the river with light feeders but the fish absolutely didn't want a static bottom bait and ended up having my best winter session using it to fish a stick float in 12ft of water with the bait moving around the currents about 4" off the bottom. It was harder work than it should have been (if I'd not been stubborn and taken two rods instead of one) but the results came anyway.
 
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