Geese - Is this legal?

Trogg

the bouncer
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The RSPB prick canada geese eggs on their reserves when they get out of hand.
The Canada is a pain in the Arris and spreads like wildfire it's classed as a pest so the RSPB pricking or oiling the eggs is understandable.
However, the Greylag (the one the OP is about) is protected as it is endangered so the RSPB are more likely to protect a nesting site!
 

rudd

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I will make this my last past as I am obviously wasting my time.

Pricking eggs is a humane way of keeping down what is {wether you like it or not} a large bird that can become a nuisance and
overwhelm a location with sheer numbers.

I am not a cruel person by any stretch of the imagination, I do not understand the hysterical reaction from some.
We get flocks of hundreds around here, farmers purposely plant fields for them to over winter on - to keep them from destroying crops. Pricking eggs is a humane control method IF Geese make nests in awkward places.
Geese are more aggressive than swans once they have young and can become quite a pest.
 

ukzero1

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Greylags aren't a protected species, they can be shot under the general license.
The Greylag is certainly protected, given an Amber status by the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. and is NOT on the U.K. (England) General Licence. However, the Canada Goose and Egyptian Goose are on General Licence (GL40) and can be shot.

Being a member of B.A.S.C. I have an up to date list of what can be shot, when, and under what circumstances.
 
Last edited:

Peter

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You cannot shoot greylag geese under The General License. :mad:

Statutory guidance

GL42: general licence to kill or take certain species of wild birds to prevent serious damage​

Published 1 January 2021

Legal basis of this licence​

This general licence permits activities that would otherwise be criminal offences under Part 1 of the 1981 Act[footnote 1].

The Secretary of State[footnote 2] has issued this general licence under powers in section 16(1)(j) and (k), and (5), of the 1981 Act.

This licence covers situations where the Secretary of State is satisfied that there is no other satisfactory solution as regards the species and purposes that this licence covers. As required by section 16 of the 1981 Act, the Secretary of State has consulted with Natural England as to the circumstances in which, in their opinion, general licences should be granted and Natural England has given this advice to the Secretary of State.

The Secretary of State can modify or revoke this licence at any time. The Secretary of State will not do so, unless there are good reasons.

Purpose of this licence​

This licence allows you to carry out activities in relation to certain species of wild birds[footnote 3], for the purposes of preventing serious damage to livestock, foodstuffs for livestock, crops, vegetables, fruit, fisheries or inland waters.

If you are an authorised person[footnote 4], and you act in accordance with this licence, you can take the following action but only for the serious damage purposes shown for each species of wild bird in Table 1 to:

  • kill[footnote 5] or take the wild bird
  • take, damage or destroy nests of the wild bird
  • take or destroy eggs of the wild bird
Table 1: action you may take to prevent serious damage, shown by species


Species (scientific name) for which action is to be takenLivestock - direct attackLivestock - feedstuffs and spread of diseaseCrops, fruit and vegetablesFisheriesInland waters
Canada goose
(Branta Canadensis)
NoNoYesYesYes
Carrion crow
(Corvus corone)
YesYesYesNoNo
Egyptian goose
(Alopochen aegyptiacus)
NoNoYesNoNo
Feral pigeon
(Columba livia)
NoYesYesNoNo
Jackdaw
(Corvus monedula)
YesYesYesNoNo
Indian house crow
(Corvus splendens)
NoNoYesNoNo
Magpie
(Pica pica)
YesNoNoNoNo
Monk parakeet
(Myiopsitta monachus)
NoNoYesNoNo
Ring-necked parakeet
(Psittacula krameri)
NoNoYesNoNo
Rook
(Corvus frugilegus)
YesYesYesNoNo
Wood pigeon
(Columba palumbus)
NoYesYesNoNo

The scientific name of a species will be used in any dispute or legal proceeding.

Who can use this licence​

You can only act under this licence if you are an authorised person. This includes the owner or occupier of the land on which action authorised by this licence is to be taken, or any person authorised by the owner or occupier.

You do not need to be registered to use this licence.

You must not act under this licence if you have been convicted on or after 1 January 2010 of a wildlife offence[footnote 6]. An exception to this is if, in respect of the wildlife offence, either of the following applies:

  • you are a rehabilitated person for the purpose of the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 and your conviction for the wildlife offence is treated as spent
  • a court has made an order discharging you absolutely in respect of the wildlife offence
You must not use this licence if the Secretary of State has withdrawn your permission to use it. Read the section on enforcement and penalties for misuse of this licence.

If you cannot use this licence, you can still apply to Natural England for an individual licence.

When you can use this licence​

This licence is valid from 1 January 2021 to 31 December 2021.

Where you can use this licence​

This licence is valid in England, landward of the mean low water mark.

Methods you can use under this licence​

You can:

  • prick eggs
  • oil eggs
  • destroy eggs and nests
  • kill or take by hand
  • use targeted falconry
  • shoot with any firearm, including semi-automatic weapons[footnote 7], shotguns or air guns
  • trap with a cage trap
  • take birds whilst not in flight with any hand-held or hand-propelled net
If you use a cage trap, it does not need to satisfy the dimension requirements of section 8(1) of the 1981 Act.

Enforcement and penalties for misuse of this licence​

If you do not comply with this licence’s terms and conditions you may face serious consequences.

Failing to comply with the licence may:

  • mean you commit a criminal offence under the 1981 Act - the maximum penalty available for such an offence is, at the time of issue of this licence, an unlimited fine and a 6 month custodial sentence
  • result in your permission to use this licence being withdrawn - the Secretary of State will notify you in writing if your permission to use this licence is withdrawn and the Secretary of State may impose a similar sanction in relation to other similar licences
You can find the full details HERE.
 

ukzero1

Growing old disgracefully.
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Joined
Oct 3, 2004
Messages
15,377
You cannot shoot greylag geese under The General License. :mad:

Statutory guidance

GL42: general licence to kill or take certain species of wild birds to prevent serious damage​

Published 1 January 2021

Legal basis of this licence​

This general licence permits activities that would otherwise be criminal offences under Part 1 of the 1981 Act[footnote 1].

The Secretary of State[footnote 2] has issued this general licence under powers in section 16(1)(j) and (k), and (5), of the 1981 Act.

This licence covers situations where the Secretary of State is satisfied that there is no other satisfactory solution as regards the species and purposes that this licence covers. As required by section 16 of the 1981 Act, the Secretary of State has consulted with Natural England as to the circumstances in which, in their opinion, general licences should be granted and Natural England has given this advice to the Secretary of State.

The Secretary of State can modify or revoke this licence at any time. The Secretary of State will not do so, unless there are good reasons.

Purpose of this licence​

This licence allows you to carry out activities in relation to certain species of wild birds[footnote 3], for the purposes of preventing serious damage to livestock, foodstuffs for livestock, crops, vegetables, fruit, fisheries or inland waters.

If you are an authorised person[footnote 4], and you act in accordance with this licence, you can take the following action but only for the serious damage purposes shown for each species of wild bird in Table 1 to:

  • kill[footnote 5] or take the wild bird
  • take, damage or destroy nests of the wild bird
  • take or destroy eggs of the wild bird
Table 1: action you may take to prevent serious damage, shown by species


Species (scientific name) for which action is to be takenLivestock - direct attackLivestock - feedstuffs and spread of diseaseCrops, fruit and vegetablesFisheriesInland waters
Canada goose
(Branta Canadensis)
NoNoYesYesYes
Carrion crow
(Corvus corone)
YesYesYesNoNo
Egyptian goose
(Alopochen aegyptiacus)
NoNoYesNoNo
Feral pigeon
(Columba livia)
NoYesYesNoNo
Jackdaw
(Corvus monedula)
YesYesYesNoNo
Indian house crow
(Corvus splendens)
NoNoYesNoNo
Magpie
(Pica pica)
YesNoNoNoNo
Monk parakeet
(Myiopsitta monachus)
NoNoYesNoNo
Ring-necked parakeet
(Psittacula krameri)
NoNoYesNoNo
Rook
(Corvus frugilegus)
YesYesYesNoNo
Wood pigeon
(Columba palumbus)
NoYesYesNoNo

The scientific name of a species will be used in any dispute or legal proceeding.

Who can use this licence​

You can only act under this licence if you are an authorised person. This includes the owner or occupier of the land on which action authorised by this licence is to be taken, or any person authorised by the owner or occupier.

You do not need to be registered to use this licence.

You must not act under this licence if you have been convicted on or after 1 January 2010 of a wildlife offence[footnote 6]. An exception to this is if, in respect of the wildlife offence, either of the following applies:

  • you are a rehabilitated person for the purpose of the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 and your conviction for the wildlife offence is treated as spent
  • a court has made an order discharging you absolutely in respect of the wildlife offence
You must not use this licence if the Secretary of State has withdrawn your permission to use it. Read the section on enforcement and penalties for misuse of this licence.

If you cannot use this licence, you can still apply to Natural England for an individual licence.

When you can use this licence​

This licence is valid from 1 January 2021 to 31 December 2021.

Where you can use this licence​

This licence is valid in England, landward of the mean low water mark.

Methods you can use under this licence​

You can:

  • prick eggs
  • oil eggs
  • destroy eggs and nests
  • kill or take by hand
  • use targeted falconry
  • shoot with any firearm, including semi-automatic weapons[footnote 7], shotguns or air guns
  • trap with a cage trap
  • take birds whilst not in flight with any hand-held or hand-propelled net
If you use a cage trap, it does not need to satisfy the dimension requirements of section 8(1) of the 1981 Act.

Enforcement and penalties for misuse of this licence​

If you do not comply with this licence’s terms and conditions you may face serious consequences.

Failing to comply with the licence may:

  • mean you commit a criminal offence under the 1981 Act - the maximum penalty available for such an offence is, at the time of issue of this licence, an unlimited fine and a 6 month custodial sentence
  • result in your permission to use this licence being withdrawn - the Secretary of State will notify you in writing if your permission to use this licence is withdrawn and the Secretary of State may impose a similar sanction in relation to other similar licences
You can find the full details HERE.
Thanks Peter, was just going to post that myself. :upthumb:
 

Peter

'Mugger'
Staff member
Site Supporter
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
21,637
Thanks Peter, was just going to post that myself. :upthumb:
No problem Pete. The surprising part is that Canada geese are the only birds that feature on the General License in relation to Fisheries.
 

ukzero1

Growing old disgracefully.
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 3, 2004
Messages
15,377
Yep, wondered about that myself. Also notice that Sacred Ibis is now on General Licence. How many of those do you see around Lindholme (other fisheries are available).
 

Stufish

Regular member
Joined
Aug 19, 2020
Messages
101
The Greylag is certainly protected, given an Amber status by the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. and is NOT on the U.K. (England) General Licence. However, the Canada Goose and Egyptian Goose are on General Licence (GL40) and can be shot.

Being a member of B.A.S.C. I have an up to date list of what can be shot, when, and under what circumstances.
I am also a member of basc and according to their website greylags and pinkfoot geese are legal quarry.
 

Stufish

Regular member
Joined
Aug 19, 2020
Messages
101
You cannot shoot greylag geese under The General License. :mad:

Statutory guidance

GL42: general licence to kill or take certain species of wild birds to prevent serious damage​

Published 1 January 2021

Legal basis of this licence​

This general licence permits activities that would otherwise be criminal offences under Part 1 of the 1981 Act[footnote 1].

The Secretary of State[footnote 2] has issued this general licence under powers in section 16(1)(j) and (k), and (5), of the 1981 Act.

This licence covers situations where the Secretary of State is satisfied that there is no other satisfactory solution as regards the species and purposes that this licence covers. As required by section 16 of the 1981 Act, the Secretary of State has consulted with Natural England as to the circumstances in which, in their opinion, general licences should be granted and Natural England has given this advice to the Secretary of State.

The Secretary of State can modify or revoke this licence at any time. The Secretary of State will not do so, unless there are good reasons.

Purpose of this licence​

This licence allows you to carry out activities in relation to certain species of wild birds[footnote 3], for the purposes of preventing serious damage to livestock, foodstuffs for livestock, crops, vegetables, fruit, fisheries or inland waters.

If you are an authorised person[footnote 4], and you act in accordance with this licence, you can take the following action but only for the serious damage purposes shown for each species of wild bird in Table 1 to:

  • kill[footnote 5] or take the wild bird
  • take, damage or destroy nests of the wild bird
  • take or destroy eggs of the wild bird
Table 1: action you may take to prevent serious damage, shown by species


Species (scientific name) for which action is to be takenLivestock - direct attackLivestock - feedstuffs and spread of diseaseCrops, fruit and vegetablesFisheriesInland waters
Canada goose
(Branta Canadensis)
NoNoYesYesYes
Carrion crow
(Corvus corone)
YesYesYesNoNo
Egyptian goose
(Alopochen aegyptiacus)
NoNoYesNoNo
Feral pigeon
(Columba livia)
NoYesYesNoNo
Jackdaw
(Corvus monedula)
YesYesYesNoNo
Indian house crow
(Corvus splendens)
NoNoYesNoNo
Magpie
(Pica pica)
YesNoNoNoNo
Monk parakeet
(Myiopsitta monachus)
NoNoYesNoNo
Ring-necked parakeet
(Psittacula krameri)
NoNoYesNoNo
Rook
(Corvus frugilegus)
YesYesYesNoNo
Wood pigeon
(Columba palumbus)
NoYesYesNoNo

The scientific name of a species will be used in any dispute or legal proceeding.

Who can use this licence​

You can only act under this licence if you are an authorised person. This includes the owner or occupier of the land on which action authorised by this licence is to be taken, or any person authorised by the owner or occupier.

You do not need to be registered to use this licence.

You must not act under this licence if you have been convicted on or after 1 January 2010 of a wildlife offence[footnote 6]. An exception to this is if, in respect of the wildlife offence, either of the following applies:

  • you are a rehabilitated person for the purpose of the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 and your conviction for the wildlife offence is treated as spent
  • a court has made an order discharging you absolutely in respect of the wildlife offence
You must not use this licence if the Secretary of State has withdrawn your permission to use it. Read the section on enforcement and penalties for misuse of this licence.

If you cannot use this licence, you can still apply to Natural England for an individual licence.

When you can use this licence​

This licence is valid from 1 January 2021 to 31 December 2021.

Where you can use this licence​

This licence is valid in England, landward of the mean low water mark.

Methods you can use under this licence​

You can:

  • prick eggs
  • oil eggs
  • destroy eggs and nests
  • kill or take by hand
  • use targeted falconry
  • shoot with any firearm, including semi-automatic weapons[footnote 7], shotguns or air guns
  • trap with a cage trap
  • take birds whilst not in flight with any hand-held or hand-propelled net
If you use a cage trap, it does not need to satisfy the dimension requirements of section 8(1) of the 1981 Act.

Enforcement and penalties for misuse of this licence​

If you do not comply with this licence’s terms and conditions you may face serious consequences.

Failing to comply with the licence may:

  • mean you commit a criminal offence under the 1981 Act - the maximum penalty available for such an offence is, at the time of issue of this licence, an unlimited fine and a 6 month custodial sentence
  • result in your permission to use this licence being withdrawn - the Secretary of State will notify you in writing if your permission to use this licence is withdrawn and the Secretary of State may impose a similar sanction in relation to other similar licences
You can find the full details HERE.

I was confusing the general license with quarry species, greylags can be shot as a quarry species ( like pheasants, partridge etc) when in season.
 

ukzero1

Growing old disgracefully.
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 3, 2004
Messages
15,377
I was confusing the general license with quarry species, greylags can be shot as a quarry species ( like pheasants, partridge etc) when in season.
I've got a reply back from an email I sent about a couple of things I needed to query to BASC. This is the part regarding Graylag.


Thank you for your inquiries.

Re: Graylag Geese.
These were removed from the GL's after discussion with RSPB. The RSPB found that numbers of this species to be reduced significantly enough for them to put these on Amber alert. It was decided to remove them from this years GL (GL40).
Anyone found to have shot, or interfered with any nest or eggs belonging to this species will be facing heavy fines.

I hope this clarifies your inquiry about this species.


EDIT.

Yes, they can be shot as a quarry species for which a special licence must be in place. :upthumb:
 
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