Future of match fishing

derwentboy

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This is an interesting post this..I can't really comment on the match fishing scene of today but do remember what t was like as a junior in the 80s when massive matches were not unusual. As for juniors all I can say is that my lad has been coming with me fishing for about 3-4 years now and he loves it , we both love it. As a member of the Prince Albert Juniors he has been able to go tomany junior events and matches that they run and learn sosmething every time. Just a few weeks ago he took part in the Junior Canal Championship down at Soudley on the Shroppie and it was agreat event. The numbers for all age categories ended up being between 120-130 participants I think. It was abrilliant event and the CRT are really trying hard to promote it. There were some really good young fishermen there and plenty of old pros from the Midlands Canal Circuit there to help, advise and encourage alongside the Lets Fish coaches. In particular there was a pleasant gent called Paul Murrin who enjoyed showing my lad the best way to chop your worms and hook a piece of hemp..really nice guy.

But that being said..120 kids in total for a National event like that is not huge..but it is a start. There is no point in wasting energy blaming Playstations and technology...you cannot fight them...each one of us right now on this forum is typing on a computer/swiping on a smartphone every single day and we are probably the older generation..they are here to stay end of. But kids don't just want that..show them something else and they are just as interested. One of the differences is that they do not move around as freely and unsupervised as before...remember how you would cycle for miles somewhere with your mates to go fishing? Those carefree freedoms are long gone for many of them and you do feel a bit sorry for them.

The Prince Albert I have mentioned above do a sterling job with their efforts and support but as most will know it is a very geographically wide club. There's no chance the juniors will see each other at the local school/canal/river on a weekly basis. If you want more youngsters coming on then it is down to local clubs...and local dads (and mums) taking those kids not just once in a holiday but regularly. Regular local faces at the tackleshop giving advice..remember that? How many kids can walk to a local tackleshop? I could then..but not now..but with a drive we can do it. More youngsters will come through fishing ( be it onto matches or merely pleasure) if the grassroots are there.

One thing is for certain though, and I have witnessed this many times in the last few years. Is how older anglers on the bank love to see a young lad or lass fishing. They love to see how they are getting on and enjoy passing on their hard won knowledge. It's almost the unspoken law of friendly anglers who like to see their craft carrying on. Kids don't experience that if they are wired into an xbox...but once they do they can tell the difference because kids can sense when it is genuine..they're not stupid. The more we do that..the more chance it'll happen but it is easy to give up (especially when parents and kids say they'll turn up and don't) ...christ I've written a lot there..I'll shut up now
 

Maesknoll

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I am not so sure on the numbers, yes it’s a shame the 100+ peg matches are rare now, but I can often have the option of attending 4 or 5 matches on one day which may have anywhere from just scraping double figures to 30 or 40 there, giving you the 100 that would be fishing one big match were it available.

I also don’t doubt that match fishing is in decline, as the numbers aren’t coming through from the junior ranks anymore. This also explains the popularity of commercials, as anglers age and also I hear many, many tales from my friends who still persevere with the canals and rivers, of inconsiderate and downright unpleasant walkers, joggers, cyclists, boaters, canoeists, swimmers and now apparently the new in thing is paddle boarding and many natural venues are infested with them.

I do sometimes hanker after a bit of stick float fishing, or taking a gallon of maggots and persuading the chub to feed whilst running a waggler through their tree in the water lair, but I really couldn’t handle all of the issues mentioned and it would get me so wound up I’d either get myself in trouble or be packing up early. So it commercials for me, I get a nice variety and try and fish those that offer a bit more than a queue stockies (although consistently winning/framing on those venues is definitely a skill, albeit one that doesn’t appeal too much to me).

This winter I will be fishing plenty of silvers matches, but all on commercials, these are popular and usually sell out, so there is some hope, for match fishing, at least in the next few years.
 

Flathead

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There are some areas where match fishing on rivers are doing OK and that is in the winter.
The nature of the fens is that fish tend to shoal up in certain areas and these host fairly big matches.

Some in my area would be the centre of March on the Old Nene river....there are regulat big matches and big weights of fish. Others would be the Whittlesey matches on the twenty foot, the matches on factory bank at Ramsey, the Old Nene at Benwick and a few more.

The drains are more fishable in the winter due to the lack of boats, lack of weed and, more importantly plenty of fish and easy access.

But it is till a long way from when many venues would be pegged for miles, on both banks.

A while ago one of the bailiffs at Yaxley told me that he could remember 300 anglers around the Great Raveley and connected drains on a weekend....now you would think some areas are never fished.

I have seen the Trent with matches on both banks for several miles. My self and my son once tried to get on the Trent near Derby but could not find a peg......when I asked what was going on I was told that it was holiday week in Birmingham....and this was midweek o_O .....we only lived two miles away!
 

Silverfisher

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There are some areas where match fishing on rivers are doing OK
They’re certainly doing ok here there’s always quite a few matches on the Thames of various sizes almost every weekend and often midweek. River fishing in general is definitely the most popular form around here alongside specimen carping. I would say commercials here are at the bottom of the pile in terms of popularity behind the rivers and carping plus even predator and possibly fly fishing as well.
 

Freesolo82

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I think you will find the people complaing that there are no big matches on the river and how it was different in there day are the same ones who complain about walking more than ten foot to get to a peg, its a lot of work to match fish on rivers and you could be carrying your gear miles and unloading your trolley multiple times to get over fences. There are only a hardcore few that are doing it year after year
 

Dave Spence

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I really miss the big river matches but I must admit, it is nice to have a breakfast at the draw and park your car where you can see it.
 

Yosemite Sam

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This is an interesting post this..I can't really comment on the match fishing scene of today but do remember what t was like as a junior in the 80s when massive matches were not unusual. As for juniors all I can say is that my lad has been coming with me fishing for about 3-4 years now and he loves it , we both love it. As a member of the Prince Albert Juniors he has been able to go tomany junior events and matches that they run and learn sosmething every time. Just a few weeks ago he took part in the Junior Canal Championship down at Soudley on the Shroppie and it was agreat event. The numbers for all age categories ended up being between 120-130 participants I think. It was abrilliant event and the CRT are really trying hard to promote it. There were some really good young fishermen there and plenty of old pros from the Midlands Canal Circuit there to help, advise and encourage alongside the Lets Fish coaches. In particular there was a pleasant gent called Paul Murrin who enjoyed showing my lad the best way to chop your worms and hook a piece of hemp..really nice guy.

But that being said..120 kids in total for a National event like that is not huge..but it is a start. There is no point in wasting energy blaming Playstations and technology...you cannot fight them...each one of us right now on this forum is typing on a computer/swiping on a smartphone every single day and we are probably the older generation..they are here to stay end of. But kids don't just want that..show them something else and they are just as interested. One of the differences is that they do not move around as freely and unsupervised as before...remember how you would cycle for miles somewhere with your mates to go fishing? Those carefree freedoms are long gone for many of them and you do feel a bit sorry for them.

The Prince Albert I have mentioned above do a sterling job with their efforts and support but as most will know it is a very geographically wide club. There's no chance the juniors will see each other at the local school/canal/river on a weekly basis. If you want more youngsters coming on then it is down to local clubs...and local dads (and mums) taking those kids not just once in a holiday but regularly. Regular local faces at the tackleshop giving advice..remember that? How many kids can walk to a local tackleshop? I could then..but not now..but with a drive we can do it. More youngsters will come through fishing ( be it onto matches or merely pleasure) if the grassroots are there.

One thing is for certain though, and I have witnessed this many times in the last few years. Is how older anglers on the bank love to see a young lad or lass fishing. They love to see how they are getting on and enjoy passing on their hard won knowledge. It's almost the unspoken law of friendly anglers who like to see their craft carrying on. Kids don't experience that if they are wired into an xbox...but once they do they can tell the difference because kids can sense when it is genuine..they're not stupid. The more we do that..the more chance it'll happen but it is easy to give up (especially when parents and kids say they'll turn up and don't) ...christ I've written a lot there..I'll shut up now
Good post that . Never heard of The prince Albert, but well done to them.
 

Rick123

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I wanted to go watch a big match, but was told they don't allow spectators? I think this is quite sad really as its a chance for us all to see our stars, and maybe learn and even have a chat with them? The problem was someone had broken an expensive pole and since then:eek::eek: Surly there could be some stewards, moderators to over-see the matches. Some are televised, so maybe a proper fishing channel is required. It is expensive to start up. I recently took seven rods (I don't use) to my local tackle shop for the kids to have. It seems people don't do that even anymore? We all need to play our part, or it will end up with expensive syndicates and clubs for carp only anglers. Lastly, we pay very little for barbel fishing and many like it, but if we continue to leave litter that will be lost too, just wait and see? The match scene is just the tip of the iceberg.
 

RJM

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Apr 3, 2013
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Judging by the foregoing comments i assume most are referring to commercials and i think they would be surprised by the current river match scene.
i fish two, sometimes three, matches per week - rarely less than 60 peggers and often much more.
Access is much improved and a walk is rare with parking behind most pegs on the Trent these days - albeit some adventurous driving down flood banks a nd fields,
To go back to the original question i believe that this type of match fishing will die out with the baby boomer generation given the average age of current participants
 
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