Frustrating day yesterday.....I’m after your help!

Joe C

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I fished a snake/canal style water yesterday (paddock lake at acorn for my fellow Bristolians.) I approached it fishing a cage feeder tight to the opposite bank.
My rod tip was banging around with the occasional full wrap round pretty much all day.

I managed to convert what I estimate to be about 12 proper bites to 4 hooked fish, 2 landed.

I was fishing a free running feeder behind a twizzled boom, hook length was about a foot, double maggot as the bait.

I’ve only been experimenting with feeder fishing for about 3 months having chosen to float fish for pretty much all of my angling life beforehand. It’s the first time I have come across this problem.

Any pointers on what I could’ve changed to develop and hit more proper bites? Also, with float fishing, experience had taught me when to strike. Where as with feeder fishing I’ve read you should almost just be winding into the fish, what I’m finding hard to see is what is a proper bite and what is a fish knocking the feeder around.

Appreciate it’s hard to say without seeing what was happening, but any pointers would be appreciated!
 

Maesknoll

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Tight across might be too far at this time of year, some of the pegs are very shallow tight across where the bank has collapsed in - or if you were going tight to the couch grass, you might have been too deep. I have not ever caught much there on a method feeder, although occasionally some do catch on it. Never really see anyone fishing a cage feeder.
Given the nature of the far bank and that the fish are a bit cute in the shallower water, I wouldn’t rely on chucking a feeder into the same spot all day. The fish patrol up and down those far banks, liners are always a problem, the lake is usually fished on the pole, often the fish coming on the drop or as soon as the bait hits the bottom.

Give it a few more weeks and the near shelf becomes productive, especially pleasure fishing. The far bank has a sloping shelf and depending on the peg, either 2 shelves, one about 2.5’- 3’ and right over can be as shallow as 6” - but you’ll still catch there in the summer.

Which peg did you fish?
 

baggy

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I probably would have fished a small method or pellet feeder and let them hook themselves. Leave the taps and wait for your rod to be pulled in.

edit: forget what I put and do what Chris has advised
 

Maesknoll

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I probably would have fished a small method or pellet feeder and let them hook themselves. Leave the taps and wait for your rod to be pulled in.

edit: forget what I put and do what Chris has advised
That’s fair enough advice Mark, but I wouldn’t be fishing tight across with a method ( maybe an odd cast for a look now and again) I’d be looking at the second shelf or even chucking it down in front of the next pallet. Also have several lines, it’s carp fishing, but they can be like F1’s in not settling. Also plenty of tench in there, usually on the bridge pegs, catch them at the bottom of the near shelf or even down the track,
 

baggy

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That’s fair enough advice Mark, but I wouldn’t be fishing tight across with a method ( maybe an odd cast for a look now and again) I’d be looking at the second shelf or even chucking it down in front of the next pallet. Also have several lines, it’s carp fishing, but they can be like F1’s in not settling. Also plenty of tench in there, usually on the bridge pegs, catch them at the bottom of the near shelf or even down the track,
I know Chris but I have never been to Acorn, so obviously you know the venue better and your advice makes complete sense
 

chefster

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I would never use a cage feeder in that situation, I think it’s totally wrong ..This time of year I’d use either a tiny hybrid, pellet, or inline maggot feeder, with a short Hooklength..Ignore taps and knocks , bites will be wrap rounds,and Fish should hook themselves. 82EC0ECE-A0A3-406F-9C04-F9FF1D0E841A.jpeg
 

Jimpanzee

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I would never use a cage feeder in that situation, I think it’s totally wrong ..This time of year I’d use either a tiny hybrid, pellet, or inline maggot feeder, with a short Hooklength..Ignore taps and knocks , bites will be wrap rounds,and Fish should hook themselves. 82EC0ECE-A0A3-406F-9C04-F9FF1D0E841A.jpeg
What is the benefit of using an inline feeder as opposed to a free running type?
 

Neil ofthe nene

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What is the benefit of using an inline feeder as opposed to a free running type?
Given the set up Joe describes it is all to do with the distance from feeder to hook and having the hookbait in the feeder.

Carp are not, as some think, stupid and like any fish can reject a hookbait without being hooked if it feels wrong. A long line let's them do this. The inline Method type feeders (Method, pellet, banjo, hybrid) are used with a short hooklength, typically four inches, that acts as a semi bolt rig and hooks the fish before it can reject the bait.

Burying the hookbait in the feeder does two things. First is to ensure the hook is in or close to the feed. Second is that the hookbait may be sucked up with a mouthful of feed and thus mask the fact there is a hook and line being sucked in for long enough for the fish to hook itself against the feeder and rod tip.

Cage feeders with long hooklengths do work. But the Method types are more effective for carp by converting more bites (the fish sucking up the hookbait) into hook ups. Many years now of using Method type feeders for carp has proved them to be a much more efficient method.
 

chefster

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What is the benefit of using an inline feeder as opposed to a free running type?
A short Hooklength of 4” , acts as a bolt rig .... hook bait is right in the pile of bait, fish just suck up bait and hook themselves 💁‍♂️Also more accurate to cast , can get in tight to features, as no long Hooklength trailing every where
 
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Jimpanzee

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Many thanks @Neil ofthe nene & @chefster I only have the free running types and have struggled this winter with overall bites and connecting with them when they do come. Looks like I need to invest in some inline feeders too. 👍
 

chefster

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Many thanks @Neil ofthe nene & @chefster I only have the free running types and have struggled this winter with overall bites and connecting with them when they do come. Looks like I need to invest in some inline feeders too. 👍
Remember with them (apart from the maggot feeder) you use a heavy short 3-4” Hooklength, and bury the hook bait in the pellets/groundbait that you put on the feeder, or just leave it partially exposed for quick bites 👍 You do still use a short Hooklength with the maggot feeder , but obviously you can’t bury the bait 👍
 

G0zzer2

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If you are casting to a shallow spot right across, it's odds-on that there is line off the bottom, which is inviting line bites from fish hitting the line somewhere just above the feeder.

Since you were getting a lot of bites the fish were obviously milling around, and that will cause the feed to end up in the deeper water anyway. As Maesknoll says, better to fish the deeper water, rather than cast past feeding fish.
 

Neil ofthe nene

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Many thanks @Neil ofthe nene & @chefster I only have the free running types and have struggled this winter with overall bites and connecting with them when they do come. Looks like I need to invest in some inline feeders too. 👍
I know it annoys some but can I refer you to my blog guide to commercial feeder fishing.

 

chefster

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If you are casting to a shallow spot right across, it's odds-on that there is line off the bottom, which is inviting line bites from fish hitting the line somewhere just above the feeder.

Since you were getting a lot of bites the fish were obviously milling around, and that will cause the feed to end up in the deeper water anyway. As Maesknoll says, better to fish the deeper water, rather than cast past feeding fish.
Personally I think he’s better off using the correct equipment 💁‍♂️
 

Jimpanzee

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