Fossils and Prehistoric Animals.

RedRidingHood

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One of my favourite arguments has always been "what came first the chicken or the egg" and when i say "the egg" they always ask the age old "but how could the egg be first if the chicken was needed to lay it" the fun begins because people cannot grasp my explanation.

Birds are the dinosaurs, dinosaurs laid eggs, the chicken is a descendant of the dinosaur, so egg came before the chicken because the chicken hadn't evolved at the point of the first egg laid by its ancestor.

That's your favourite argument, Trogg? Try telling a 5 year old that birds are dinosaurs and getting out of the dispute alive 😁
 

Trogg

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That's your favourite argument, Trogg? Try telling a 5 year old that birds are dinosaurs and getting out of the dispute alive 😁

I have and my 5yr old grew to love all things dinosaur/prehistoric, even at an early age she was determined that T rex, Allosaurus etc would be camoflauged with green and brown patches etc to enable them to blend into their surroundings for ambush attacks!

She was also determined that the anklosaurus would have a bright red end to its tail ...as much as i laugh, i have to admit she could have a point!
 

NoCarpPlease

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One of my favourite arguments has always been "what came first the chicken or the egg" and when i say "the egg" they always ask the age old "but how could the egg be first if the chicken was needed to lay it" the fun begins because people cannot grasp my explanation.

Birds are the dinosaurs, dinosaurs laid eggs, the chicken is a descendant of the dinosaur, so egg came before the chicken because the chicken hadn't evolved at the point of the first egg laid by its ancestor.
I sort of agree - except that speciation doesn't really happen in one generation

of course - it could have all happened in the last 6000 years ... or 6016 and approx one month to be more accurate ;)
 

Trogg

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I sort of agree - except that speciation doesn't really happen in one generation


of course - it could have all happened in the last 6000 years ... or 6016 and approx one month to be more accurate ;)

Not one generation no, but over a period of 66 million years and travelling half way around a galaxy ..... it's quite possible! ;)
 

RedhillPhil

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Awesome. A dream of mine to visit the Jurassic Coast and I'll certainly go one day. The place is FULL of interesting fossils, Incredible specimens are found every year. Heres a video of a guy extracting an Icthyosaur there Not sure what the regulations are on digging up something along these lines, I'm sure you'd need a license of sorts? :unsure:


What was your thoughts on it Phil? I loved it, great read. Haven't read the book you've suggested, But it's only about a £10.00. Might give it a shot!

Belemnites? I live just down the road from Huntstanton, More specifically 'Old Huntstanton' which is famous for it's colourful rock formations. It's incredibly rich in what you've just described, With the odd other fossils being found.



Whats the point in anything though? A game of Football, Rugby, Tennis or even Football? To some History is a past time, an interest, hobby & fascination. To others it's more than that, a job that helps us understand things that're pretty important. Evolution for instance, Cataclysmic events, the effects & recovery periods of said events.


I'm still very, very ill-equipped for a debate on the subject but some things are just hard to otherwise explain without backing it up with solid evidence which is near enough impossible for the latter party.

Whales still retaining a pelvis, or leg bones. The same with snakes. Babies being born with 'ape like tails', The constant battle against certain diseases such as HIV due to them becoming increasingly immune to drugs. We even conduct live experiments with bacteria, watch the reproduction process and how it differs over time. Even then, We have Darwins Finches and most recently the case on the 'Italian Wall Lizard'

The Hot Blooded Dinosaurs really opened my eyes to the theory - since pretty much accepted - that those feathered fluttering things on the lawn are dinosaurs. There's lots of evidence of the fast moving raptors of various species and sized needed to be able to process their fuel (food) quickly and efficiently to produce the energy required for hunting. Warm blood in the answer. Witness Tuna and some species of shark that have (relatively) warm blood.
 

banksy

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Walking in the French Alps at a height of about 4,000 feet, I saw lots of perfect, tiny shell fossils embedded in the limestone of the mountain.
Staggering to think of the time which has passed, and the upheaval of those sedimentary layers, since those shellfish were living on the sea bed.

Or have the mountains always been that high, and the fossils plonked into the limestone by the sky fairies?

o_O mt-st-victoire.jpg
 
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rudd

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Dinosaurs and everything else that has lived and died over millions of years has had an evolutionary effect on humans. Dinosaurs may even seal our fate.
Fossil fuels have allowed human kind to evolve and develop technology.
The same fossil fuels which could be the death of this planet and mankind.
 

OldTaff

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One of my favourite arguments has always been "what came first the chicken or the egg" and when i say "the egg" they always ask the age old "but how could the egg be first if the chicken was needed to lay it" the fun begins because people cannot grasp my explanation.

Birds are the dinosaurs, dinosaurs laid eggs, the chicken is a descendant of the dinosaur, so egg came before the chicken because the chicken hadn't evolved at the point of the first egg laid by its ancestor.

My brother—in-law created this fantastic group on FB “The Dinosaur on your Windowsill”, and this may well be a part answer to the chicken & egg

A30D44E5-945E-46C7-818E-A8ED15234A7F.png
 

OldTaff

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As a priest I should point out that I don’t have issues with the science around creation and evolution - if you look at the Genesis account taking each day as a period within the development of earth then for a written record of oral history dating back thousands of years it is fairly spot on:

Let there be light - the big bang
Separation of the atmosphere & firmament
Dry ground and plants
Animals of the sea and air
Animals on the land
Humans

Over many years I have learned to play nicely with highly polarised people on both sides of the biblical/scientific fence but I believe there is room for all views if you have an open mind.
 

davej

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Walking in the French Alps at a height of about 4,000 feet, I saw lots of perfect, tiny shell fossils embedded in the limestone of the mountain.
Staggering to think of the time which has passed, and the upheaval of those sedimentary layers, since those shellfish were living on the sea bed.

Or have the mountains always been that high, and the fossils plonked into the limestone by the sky fairies?

o_O View attachment 88717
When i lived in Box in Wiltshire all of the stones in a ploughed field were small clam like shells.
 

Pompous git

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One of the most terrifying animals on this planet IMO are monitor lizards. They make alligators look positively cuddly.
 

rudd

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The sun is estimated to be halfway through its life cycle and has around 5 billion years left.
Earth has an estimated 1.75 billion years of habitual time left that could support life.
Dinosaurs lived on Earth for around 177 million years
Human kind is around 300,000 years old.
I wonder what will take over the lease when our time comes as cannot see humans even lasting another 1000 years!
 

CluelessFishing

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The sun is estimated to be halfway through its life cycle and has around 5 billion years left.
Earth has an estimated 1.75 billion years of habitual time left that could support life.
Dinosaurs lived on Earth for around 177 million years
Human kind is around 300,000 years old.
I wonder what will take over the lease when our time comes as cannot see humans even lasting another 1000 years!
I imagine what takes over will depend upon the manner in which the lease is terminated. If we manage to wipe ourselves out by developing more and more cataclysmic weapons which we then use to wipe ourselves from the face of the earth completely perhaps only much lower forms of life such as roaches or simple deep sea creatures will survive or and restart the evolutionary cycle . On the other hand if we are wiped out in a more "natural " manner by virus for example ( which is quite unlikely as viruses don't wipe out 100% of their host species normally but I supppose theres always a first time) then maybe a more advanced form of life such as apes for example will take up the baton so to speak.
 

Pompous git

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Who is monitoring the monitor lizards when the monitor lizard monitor is on his break?

Well you started it:)
 

Trogg

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As a priest I should point out that I don’t have issues with the science around creation and evolution - if you look at the Genesis account taking each day as a period within the development of earth then for a written record of oral history dating back thousands of years it is fairly spot on:

Let there be light - the big bang
Separation of the atmosphere & firmament
Dry ground and plants
Animals of the sea and air
Animals on the land
Humans

Over many years I have learned to play nicely with highly polarised people on both sides of the biblical/scientific fence but I believe there is room for all views if you have an open mind.


ohhhh Go..erm Jes...er hel..... oh heck, he's one o'them bible bashers....burn him, burn him before he pollutes us all!! ;)


One of the most terrifying animals on this planet IMO are monitor lizards. They make alligators look positively cuddly.

Loved my mates Nile monitor, it was great when he walked it....even funnier when it would see some old dear with her yorky or scottie and Neffie would lick her lips whilst staring at the dog :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:

Wouldn't mind a Komodo monitor (dragon) , i reckon they could be a fun pet to have, be great walking one around my way...it would get fat pretty quick on all the litttle scrote wannabe gangsters.
 

OldTaff

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ohhhh Go..erm Jes...er hel..... oh heck, he's one o'them bible bashers....burn him, burn him before he pollutes us all!! ;)

I usually go by Jesus freak or reverend ;) but I promise not to work my weird godly wiles on the MD’ers:)
 
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