Former top detective to lead Angling Trust’s fisheries enforcement support team

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A former police officer with over 30 years’ experience in the force has been appointed National Enforcement Support Manager of the Angling Trust’s Fisheries Enforcement Support Service, which runs the 500-strong Voluntary Bailiff Service and the highly successful Building Bridges project working with migrant anglers.

Nino Brancato retired from Thames Valley Police as Detective Inspector having worked mainly within the Criminal Investigation Department but was also seconded for over 10 years to National Specialist Operational teams working across the United Kingdom.

Throughout his career, Nino has received many commendations for his work including a Higher Chief Constable’s Commendation for disarming a man with a pump action shotgun who was wanted for murder and a Commander’s Commendation for a positive action programme for under-represented officers in specialist roles.

Nino said: “I am really looking forward to working with the Angling Trust’s Fisheries Enforcement Support Service and building on the great partnership we have with the Environment Agency. Our 500 volunteer bailiffs, led by a dedicated team of Regional Enforcement Managers, and our Building Bridges team provide quality intelligence which supports the work undertaken by the Environment Agency’s fisheries officers and police. They put anglers and the environment at the heart of everything they do to help protect fish and fisheries all over the country.”

Mark Owen, Head of Freshwater, said: “Nino comes to the Angling Trust with a wealth of experience in policing and I’m looking forward to working with him as we build on the success of the Fisheries Enforcement Support Service and take it to the next level. Having someone of Nino’s experience and seniority is a great asset to both the Angling Trust and fishing as a whole.”

Graeme Storey, Fisheries Manager at the Environment Agency, said: “We have a great relationship with the Angling Trust and look forward to seeing this continue to develop with Nino as the new National Enforcement Support Manager. We are working hard to crack down on illegal fishing, working in partnership with the Angling Trust, police and others to protect our fisheries. With the skills and experience Nino brings to the role, we are confident that we will build on our achievements so far and further reduce illegal fishing activity.”

The Fisheries Enforcement Support Service is funded from fishing licence money as part of the Angling Trust’s National Angling Strategic Services contract with the Environment Agency.

It includes the Voluntary Bailiff Service which was set up five years ago as a pilot project in the South East and now has 500 volunteers operating across the whole of England. They act as the eyes and ears on the bank, reporting suspicious activity and intelligence to the Environment Agency or police. Anglers who want to protect fisheries and suspect illegal activity is taken place in their area should report it in the first instance to the Environment Agency’s hotline on 0800 80 70 60. They can also report to our Regional Enforcement Managers or speak to a volunteer bailiff on the bank.

The Building Bridges project has made huge progress towards the successful integration of migrant angling communities in England and provides positive education and advice to help anglers understand our angling laws and customs. The team also support angling clubs and fisheries by translating their rules into different languages and offering free multi-lingual signage and leaflets.

Nino replaces Dilip Sarkar MBE who left the Angling Trust earlier this year after eight years in the role.

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The post Former top detective to lead Angling Trust’s fisheries enforcement support team appeared first on Angling Trust.

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SteveinSwindon

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I am a bit confused by the statement "The Fisheries Enforcement Support Service is funded from fishing licence money as part of the Angling Trust’s National Angling Strategic Services contract with the Environment Agency."

I was under the impression the rod licence fee goes to the Environment Agency who are then responsible for bailiffing, but the article also mentions an AT volunteer bailiff force, so presumably unpaid? Do AT bailiffs, or this support service, have any legal powers?
 

tipitinmick

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Minimum wage I bet ..... not. WTF do we need another hanger on for ? Whatever. Expect license fees to go up next year and the year after to pay for it.
 

chris1967

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free multi-lingual signage and leaflets. try this one nino any poacher and thieving scrote should be able to understand

flat,750x,075,f-pad,750x1000,f8f8f8.u5.jpg
 

Dave

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Here you go, all you need to know about the AT's VBS

 

carphauler

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I think volunteer trust bailiffs and the support service do just that, support the police and EA enforcement officers with information and reporting on illegal activities.
Only the police or EA officers have any power to confiscate or arrest as far as I know.
 

SteveinSwindon

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Here you go, all you need to know about the AT's VBS

So the Environment Agency, who have suitable legal powers and are funded by licence money, outsource to a group of volunteers with no such power? Priceless :oops:
 

Dave

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As far as I know the VBS work with the Police so if an issue arose where they need support the police would be alerted and called in.

The VBS scheme came about several years ago in response to angler complaints re the lack of EA Bailiffs. The EA were never going to be able to fund a small army of bailiffs in order to satisfy the complaints and put boots on the bank, so the volunteer bailiff scheme was started.
 

mike fox

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It's no different to a national charity whereby a small number of directors are paid handsomely to administrate an army of volunteers. It's how organisations like the AT function.
 
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