For the love of all that is holy, carp.

MartinWY

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I can't think of anywhere in my fishing where there isn't variety, it's so easy if you look for it.

Given you don't fish canals, rivers or fish at all in winter I'd suggest carp may be more welcome than you realize Martin, deep down you actually love them right? :)
This is going to sound silly, but I feel as though I miss the possibility of blanking.
 

Neil ofthe nene

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I fully appreciate that what I am about to write may be upsetting but I think it needs saying.

You admit that your skills and venue knowledge appear to limit you to fishing commercials that are predominantly stocked with carp and then complain about catching carp. Surely, rather than complain about the species of fish you are capable of catching you should be looking to expand your skills and knowledge so you can fish carp free venues.

There are plenty of videos showing and instructing on fishing other than on carp dominated waters. There will be members on here willing to fish with you and guide you in techniques you may not currently fish.

The solutuion to your frustration lies in your own hands.

P.S. A month ago I blanked in a six hour match on a commercial, as did the angler next to me.
 

mickthechippy

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This is why I love Fishing my often derogated local canal, the Royal Military on the Romney marsh, its not a canal as you might suppose in the accepted fact, but an earthwork that was concieved as a defensive measure to stop invasion by Napoleons army ( after they had crossed a 22 mile stretch of sea, work that out if you can ? )

its to my mind a fantastic fishery, holding a multitude of species, pretty near all the naturally occuring british native fresh water fishys from eyes and arses to specimen sizes, you never know what your going to catch, or even if your catch at all !

there are carp, and carp in good numbers, most of which have been stocked over the last 30 odd years by the various controlling clubs with the assistance of the EA, these run in size from the stockings over the past two years of fish from 1lb to 10lb, with the now resident and breeding fish which have grown on enormously, reaching sizes in the mid thirties, the biggest I have ever heard of or seen is near touching the forty pound mark

I can ruck up there, often parking behind or very close to my peg, across a wide variety of places ranging from urban in town manicured banks, to rough, cut your own pegs way out in the middle of nowhere with only maybe a tractor working on the fields or sheep and cattle for company

apart from that, locally there are a plethora of venues available to me depending on the mood Im in, these range from pretty near carp only, being stocked with all sorts of the carp genre including mutant F1's, rivers au natural, farm ponds, old estate lakes, good mixed fisherys that provide plenty of entertainment depending on our approach to the water

catching carps aint everything, there must be venues close to you that with a bit of dilligent searching and gleaning info from others that would suffice in your quest for different days, I do find those that often mither on about carp, carp, carp, fail to do the research required to change thier point of view, there are plenty of alternatives if your that way inclined, but they aint gonna just fall into your lap like a commercial fishery will do
 

RedhillPhil

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Been away fishing for a week at multiple venues. Weather has been mixed but mostly fishable, even if I was a little too cocksure with the margin pole in 15mph wind. Almost broke it, but no, my pole is perfectly in tact despite the rough handling.

I'm just so tired of catching carp. I made a thread last year asking how to avoid it. Not because I don't like the species or the amazing fight, but just because I like variety. I get specialist carp fishing, I do. I get the careful long term pursuit of a 40lb monster. I get the endless weekends, the hasty justifications to the husband or wife, the sacrifices made to bag the ultimate beast. I really do and I never understood why anyone would dislike a particular species of fish for any reason.

This week though, one day in particular, my catches were, 3oz perch, 1/2lb skimmer, carp, carp, carp, carp, carp, bacon sandwich, carp, 10lb+ carp, carp, carp, carp, carp, carp, carp, 2lb bream. Most of the others were similar days. It's just carp after carp. Aside from a matchman, does ANYONE want such a catch on a given day? Neither specimens, nor variety. By the end of it, I wanted to throw myself in and hope for a Great White shark.

To me, that isn't an enjoyable days fishing really. I'm not trying to get match weights, I just want to catch fish. In the 30 years before I restarted, I don't ever, ever, remember this sort of thing happening. It was more like perch, perch, perch, perch, perch, roach, perch, tench, perch, rudd, roach, perch perch, skimmer, perch, skimmer.

I've tried a multitude of different baits over the week. Even double red maggot resulted in....you guessed it, carp. Thats in 2ft of water and it took 2 minutes. Wasn't even a bad fish! Fisheries need to sort out their priorities. Either they are match fisheries, specimen fisheries, or pleasure fisheries. You can't be all things to all people, all of the time.

Forgetting my personal preferences, this can't be good from an ecological perspective, can it?

If I cannot catch a roach 1ft from the surface on caster, but instead catch a carp, thats messed up, imo.

Catch a double figure carp on relatively light tackle is great fun, I don't deny that. It's just that if your entire expectancy consists of carp, to me it feels like you're no longer fishing. My friends in the US absolutely hate them, which I never understood, since most of their fishing is generally one or two species in fresh water.

I am not anti carp or anti carp angler, even slightly. I just don't get the obsession with chucking carp in every tiny puddle someone might fish. It makes for a very bland day out.

I did notice in a search that some lakes do not stock carp, but it's few and far between. I guess I just want a normal days coarse fishing. Is it too much to ask?
You're singing my song.
 

MartinWY

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I fully appreciate that what I am about to write may be upsetting but I think it needs saying.

You admit that your skills and venue knowledge appear to limit you to fishing commercials that are predominantly stocked with carp and then complain about catching carp. Surely, rather than complain about the species of fish you are capable of catching you should be looking to expand your skills and knowledge so you can fish carp free venues.

There are plenty of videos showing and instructing on fishing other than on carp dominated waters. There will be members on here willing to fish with you and guide you in techniques you may not currently fish.

The solutuion to your frustration lies in your own hands.

P.S. A month ago I blanked in a six hour match on a commercial, as did the angler next to me.
Hi Neil. Not upsetting at all, your comments are always welcome.

Interesting you mention natural venues. I posted a thread about that subject the other day, discussing what would be considered natural.

I spent my youth fishing what I suppose you'd now call natural venues, mostly stillwaters. I'm not even sure commercials existed back then, at least not in the form they do now? I fished a true commercial, with cafe and bogs, for the first time this year, at Risby Folly. I tried the "mixed" lake and caught all carp/F1, except for one small perch, oh and a skimmer.

Anyhow, since returning in 2019, I'd stuck to a mix of club waters and estate lakes. I caught my first ever carp the same year.

It's not so much about being afraid to take on an unknown natural venue or entirely lacking the knowledge to do so, it's more finding one that hasn't had it's fish stock pudding, over egged. You chaps that have decades in the sport know where to look for such places, but since my old haunts are basically gone, I'm stuck with Google and its very hard to find anything other than commercials, at least it feels that way. Waters going to syndicates don't help much either, not that I'm averse to joining one, but they all seem to be focused on specimen carp. I get why, it's popular. Specimen carp are an entirely different consideration and I didn't have them in mind when creating this thread.

Had a look at the York book and it seemed to have a few nice mixed ponds, such as the one at Caxton, but then I read about it online and people commented that it was suffering from neglect, so back to square one. Also considered getting in line for PAAS, but in reality the venues are a little far away.

I have no complaints about catching carp, it's just not something I want to do all day long no matter which tactics I use.

I'd love a day out on the river for chub and barbel, if anyone reading this fancies showing me the ropes, I'd buy the butties. Also open to venue recommendations. I think I have tackle for most situations, except perhaps barbel, not sure on that.
 

MartinWY

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there must be venues close to you that with a bit of dilligent searching and gleaning info from others that would suffice in your quest for different days, I do find those that often mither on about carp, carp, carp, fail to do the research required to change thier point of view, there are plenty of alternatives if your that way inclined, but they aint gonna just fall into your lap like a commercial fishery will do
I guess most of the more natural venues don't really advertise and info online can be scant or out of date.

For example, theres a lake nearby I fished as a child. It's day ticket and you buy at the local shop these days. Only once you have the ticket in hand, would you even know who has the rights. Searching online shows information that is a decade out of date.

Local knowledge is everything and I think unless you move in certain circles, it can be very hard to know where to look, unless you happen upon a lake with a helpful sign.
 

mickthechippy

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I guess most of the more natural venues don't really advertise and info online can be scant or out of date.

For example, theres a lake nearby I fished as a child. It's day ticket and you buy at the local shop these days. Only once you have the ticket in hand, would you even know who has the rights. Searching online shows information that is a decade out of date.

Local knowledge is everything and I think unless you move in certain circles, it can be very hard to know where to look, unless you happen upon a lake with a helpful sign.
Google Maps is a fantastic resource

By using it, I have found places you wouldnt even know they were there

I normally start off by punching in an area that i fancy looking at and leaving it in "Map" mode, this will show you untold patches of blue, which designate pools, lakes, ponds, drains, streams etc

then I switch to live view and focus in to see iffin there is access to wherever Ive found, often if you tune right in, you can see either pegs, cut swims or similar, if the place is in use

I then look up online to see if theres any info, and after that, me and him will exercise our right to roam and get out there to have a good look see,

if your not sure whether the place is owned or run by someone, the nearest local farm or post office-local shop will be a source of good information, or in the case of no info, you could go "guesting" and see what occurs,
 

JayD

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Hi Neil. Not upsetting at all, your comments are always welcome.

Interesting you mention natural venues. I posted a thread about that subject the other day, discussing what would be considered natural.

I spent my youth fishing what I suppose you'd now call natural venues, mostly stillwaters. I'm not even sure commercials existed back then, at least not in the form they do now? I fished a true commercial, with cafe and bogs, for the first time this year, at Risby Folly. I tried the "mixed" lake and caught all carp/F1, except for one small perch, oh and a skimmer.

Anyhow, since returning in 2019, I'd stuck to a mix of club waters and estate lakes. I caught my first ever carp the same year.

It's not so much about being afraid to take on an unknown natural venue or entirely lacking the knowledge to do so, it's more finding one that hasn't had it's fish stock pudding, over egged. You chaps that have decades in the sport know where to look for such places, but since my old haunts are basically gone, I'm stuck with Google and its very hard to find anything other than commercials, at least it feels that way. Waters going to syndicates don't help much either, not that I'm averse to joining one, but they all seem to be focused on specimen carp. I get why, it's popular. Specimen carp are an entirely different consideration and I didn't have them in mind when creating this thread.

Had a look at the York book and it seemed to have a few nice mixed ponds, such as the one at Caxton, but then I read about it online and people commented that it was suffering from neglect, so back to square one. Also considered getting in line for PAAS, but in reality the venues are a little far away.

I have no complaints about catching carp, it's just not something I want to do all day long no matter which tactics I use.

I'd love a day out on the river for chub and barbel, if anyone reading this fancies showing me the ropes, I'd buy the butties. Also open to venue recommendations. I think I have tackle for most situations, except perhaps barbel, not sure on that.
Hi Martin, I gather from your posts that you have been away from angling for quite a few years until coming back a couple of years ago. A lot has happened during the past 25/30 years, and although it seems to have come as a surprise to you, some of us have sadly witnessed this gradual insidious spread of overstocked, single specie dominant 'fisheries'. Initially with the flawed idea of more equal match weights in mind, which then spread, and mutated a bit like a virus, to include the casual/pleasure angler. The 'virus' in this case, being mainly carp based, but also including so called 'exotic' species. Some saw a chance of financial profit in this, and dug holes and filled them with these fish, (sadly they also added water ;)). The tackle companies saw a whole new potential market springing up, and realised, long before some of the 'fishery' owners, that this was a growing, self sustaining market because as the fish grew, more robust tackle would be needed, especially if match anglers were to compete. This where this type of fishery has been thought of as "saving angling". The down side has been, as you have noted, that many angling associations, such as York, and my own local one Leeds & district, were 'forced to stock many of their still waters to a similar level, reducing our choices. I notice now many of the waters that produced a 'carp a chuck', a few years ago, when first stocked, are now classed as 'specimen carp waters, and finding bank space can seem like a lottery. The down side to all this is the loss of membership to many of these once big associations, causing loss of revenue, which in turn caused loss of waters, and insufficient funds or membership, to maintain the fisheries they have. Leeds actually own some of their waters, but much of the bank is inaccessible through neglect, many of the anglers I meet on the banks carry spades, and machetes to try and cut a path to the river before they can fish!
You wrote, "Forgetting my personal preferences, this can't be good from an ecological perspective, can it?", my answer is 'no it isn't' but the practice has been sanctioned, and even promoted by the powers that be, ie, the Environment agency, and the Angling Trust, I have my own cynical ideas as to why, but I'll keep them to myself for now.
I, like you, fished some of these waters in the 90s, and found them not to my taste, and adapted my tackle, to make sure I lost the carp, when the inevitable hook up happened, ie, fine wire hooks that straightened, but then as I've explained above, I saw my choices slowly, and irreversibly, eroded, until my choice of enjoyable waters to fish are probably about 10% of what it used to be.
A recent thread showed that the lack of choice varies from area to area, and some lucky souls have more choice than others, I envy them.
The only reasons for the existence of this stocking policy, that I can see, and I've not heard a better reason, is a mixture of financial gain on one side and ego on the other.
For now I wish you luck in finding a water or two that you can enjoy fishing, but will echo what some have said, and that is to expand your experience to include rivers. I don't know your local waters but be prepared to maybe dig a few swims out prior to fishing.
Another option is to take up another pastime like golf, but be sure to find a course without a water hazard, because that's probably full of bloody carp as well! ;)

John.
 

Dave Spence

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Google Maps is a fantastic resource

By using it, I have found places you wouldnt even know they were there

I normally start off by punching in an area that i fancy looking at and leaving it in "Map" mode, this will show you untold patches of blue, which designate pools, lakes, ponds, drains, streams etc

then I switch to live view and focus in to see iffin there is access to wherever Ive found, often if you tune right in, you can see either pegs, cut swims or similar, if the place is in use

I then look up online to see if theres any info, and after that, me and him will exercise our right to roam and get out there to have a good look see,

if your not sure whether the place is owned or run by someone, the nearest local farm or post office-local shop will be a source of good information, or in the case of no info, you could go "guesting" and see what occurs,
One of my favourite pastime's Mick.
 

Sam Vimes

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Until a few weeks ago, I'd not caught a single carp in the best part of two years. I managed that largely by fishing rivers and avoiding any day ticket waters with carp in them. However, I don't entirely avoid venues with carp present. Fortunately, on the carp stocked venue I usually frequent, they are of a size and low stock density that makes them relatively easy to avoid.
 

Total

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Hi Martin, I gather from your posts that you have been away from angling for quite a few years until coming back a couple of years ago. A lot has happened during the past 25/30 years, and although it seems to have come as a surprise to you, some of us have sadly witnessed this gradual insidious spread of overstocked, single specie dominant 'fisheries'. Initially with the flawed idea of more equal match weights in mind, which then spread, and mutated a bit like a virus, to include the casual/pleasure angler. The 'virus' in this case, being mainly carp based, but also including so called 'exotic' species. Some saw a chance of financial profit in this, and dug holes and filled them with these fish, (sadly they also added water ;)). The tackle companies saw a whole new potential market springing up, and realised, long before some of the 'fishery' owners, that this was a growing, self sustaining market because as the fish grew, more robust tackle would be needed, especially if match anglers were to compete. This where this type of fishery has been thought of as "saving angling". The down side has been, as you have noted, that many angling associations, such as York, and my own local one Leeds & district, were 'forced to stock many of their still waters to a similar level, reducing our choices. I notice now many of the waters that produced a 'carp a chuck', a few years ago, when first stocked, are now classed as 'specimen carp waters, and finding bank space can seem like a lottery. The down side to all this is the loss of membership to many of these once big associations, causing loss of revenue, which in turn caused loss of waters, and insufficient funds or membership, to maintain the fisheries they have. Leeds actually own some of their waters, but much of the bank is inaccessible through neglect, many of the anglers I meet on the banks carry spades, and machetes to try and cut a path to the river before they can fish!
You wrote, "Forgetting my personal preferences, this can't be good from an ecological perspective, can it?", my answer is 'no it isn't' but the practice has been sanctioned, and even promoted by the powers that be, ie, the Environment agency, and the Angling Trust, I have my own cynical ideas as to why, but I'll keep them to myself for now.
I, like you, fished some of these waters in the 90s, and found them not to my taste, and adapted my tackle, to make sure I lost the carp, when the inevitable hook up happened, ie, fine wire hooks that straightened, but then as I've explained above, I saw my choices slowly, and irreversibly, eroded, until my choice of enjoyable waters to fish are probably about 10% of what it used to be.
A recent thread showed that the lack of choice varies from area to area, and some lucky souls have more choice than others, I envy them.
The only reasons for the existence of this stocking policy, that I can see, and I've not heard a better reason, is a mixture of financial gain on one side and ego on the other.
For now I wish you luck in finding a water or two that you can enjoy fishing, but will echo what some have said, and that is to expand your experience to include rivers. I don't know your local waters but be prepared to maybe dig a few swims out prior to fishing.
Another option is to take up another pastime like golf, but be sure to find a course without a water hazard, because that's probably full of bloody carp as well! ;)

John.
^^ :giggle:....Was you born with your own milk crate Jay?:blahblah::p;)
 

MartinWY

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Hi Martin, I gather from your posts that you have been away from angling for quite a few years until coming back a couple of years ago. A lot has happened during the past 25/30 years, and although it seems to have come as a surprise to you, some of us have sadly witnessed this gradual insidious spread of overstocked, single specie dominant 'fisheries'. Initially with the flawed idea of more equal match weights in mind, which then spread, and mutated a bit like a virus, to include the casual/pleasure angler. The 'virus' in this case, being mainly carp based, but also including so called 'exotic' species. Some saw a chance of financial profit in this, and dug holes and filled them with these fish, (sadly they also added water ;)). The tackle companies saw a whole new potential market springing up, and realised, long before some of the 'fishery' owners, that this was a growing, self sustaining market because as the fish grew, more robust tackle would be needed, especially if match anglers were to compete. This where this type of fishery has been thought of as "saving angling". The down side has been, as you have noted, that many angling associations, such as York, and my own local one Leeds & district, were 'forced to stock many of their still waters to a similar level, reducing our choices. I notice now many of the waters that produced a 'carp a chuck', a few years ago, when first stocked, are now classed as 'specimen carp waters, and finding bank space can seem like a lottery. The down side to all this is the loss of membership to many of these once big associations, causing loss of revenue, which in turn caused loss of waters, and insufficient funds or membership, to maintain the fisheries they have. Leeds actually own some of their waters, but much of the bank is inaccessible through neglect, many of the anglers I meet on the banks carry spades, and machetes to try and cut a path to the river before they can fish!
You wrote, "Forgetting my personal preferences, this can't be good from an ecological perspective, can it?", my answer is 'no it isn't' but the practice has been sanctioned, and even promoted by the powers that be, ie, the Environment agency, and the Angling Trust, I have my own cynical ideas as to why, but I'll keep them to myself for now.
I, like you, fished some of these waters in the 90s, and found them not to my taste, and adapted my tackle, to make sure I lost the carp, when the inevitable hook up happened, ie, fine wire hooks that straightened, but then as I've explained above, I saw my choices slowly, and irreversibly, eroded, until my choice of enjoyable waters to fish are probably about 10% of what it used to be.
A recent thread showed that the lack of choice varies from area to area, and some lucky souls have more choice than others, I envy them.
The only reasons for the existence of this stocking policy, that I can see, and I've not heard a better reason, is a mixture of financial gain on one side and ego on the other.
For now I wish you luck in finding a water or two that you can enjoy fishing, but will echo what some have said, and that is to expand your experience to include rivers. I don't know your local waters but be prepared to maybe dig a few swims out prior to fishing.
Another option is to take up another pastime like golf, but be sure to find a course without a water hazard, because that's probably full of bloody carp as well! ;)

John.
I'm in the same area as you, so if I spot anything likely, I'll let you know.
 

badgerale

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Been away fishing for a week at multiple venues. Weather has been mixed but mostly fishable, even if I was a little too cocksure with the margin pole in 15mph wind. Almost broke it, but no, my pole is perfectly in tact despite the rough handling.

I'm just so tired of catching carp. I made a thread last year asking how to avoid it. Not because I don't like the species or the amazing fight, but just because I like variety. I get specialist carp fishing, I do. I get the careful long term pursuit of a 40lb monster. I get the endless weekends, the hasty justifications to the husband or wife, the sacrifices made to bag the ultimate beast. I really do and I never understood why anyone would dislike a particular species of fish for any reason.

This week though, one day in particular, my catches were, 3oz perch, 1/2lb skimmer, carp, carp, carp, carp, carp, bacon sandwich, carp, 10lb+ carp, carp, carp, carp, carp, carp, carp, 2lb bream. Most of the others were similar days. It's just carp after carp. Aside from a matchman, does ANYONE want such a catch on a given day? Neither specimens, nor variety. By the end of it, I wanted to throw myself in and hope for a Great White shark.

To me, that isn't an enjoyable days fishing really. I'm not trying to get match weights, I just want to catch fish. In the 30 years before I restarted, I don't ever, ever, remember this sort of thing happening. It was more like perch, perch, perch, perch, perch, roach, perch, tench, perch, rudd, roach, perch perch, skimmer, perch, skimmer.

I've tried a multitude of different baits over the week. Even double red maggot resulted in....you guessed it, carp. Thats in 2ft of water and it took 2 minutes. Wasn't even a bad fish! Fisheries need to sort out their priorities. Either they are match fisheries, specimen fisheries, or pleasure fisheries. You can't be all things to all people, all of the time.

Forgetting my personal preferences, this can't be good from an ecological perspective, can it?

If I cannot catch a roach 1ft from the surface on caster, but instead catch a carp, thats messed up, imo.

Catch a double figure carp on relatively light tackle is great fun, I don't deny that. It's just that if your entire expectancy consists of carp, to me it feels like you're no longer fishing. My friends in the US absolutely hate them, which I never understood, since most of their fishing is generally one or two species in fresh water.

I am not anti carp or anti carp angler, even slightly. I just don't get the obsession with chucking carp in every tiny puddle someone might fish. It makes for a very bland day out.

I did notice in a search that some lakes do not stock carp, but it's few and far between. I guess I just want a normal days coarse fishing. Is it too much to ask?
I'm absolutely of the same mind - it's encouraging to hear people say this as it sometimes feels like if I complain about carp being everywhere then people look at me like I'm mental. It's as if they can't quite fathom the concept that there is more to fishing than one fish (and not even a natural fish).

One thing I've noticed is that there is a vicious cycle to it - once the carp are omnipresent, even if you don't want to target them you have to gear up enough to deal with it. Which decreases your enjoyment in catching smaller fish... eventually you find yourself fishing for carp because that's what your setup is designed for.

To be fair, I am getting a bit bitter and twisted over it, and I need to watch that.
 

centerpin fan

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Been away fishing for a week at multiple venues. Weather has been mixed but mostly fishable, even if I was a little too cocksure with the margin pole in 15mph wind. Almost broke it, but no, my pole is perfectly in tact despite the rough handling.

I'm just so tired of catching carp. I made a thread last year asking how to avoid it. Not because I don't like the species or the amazing fight, but just because I like variety. I get specialist carp fishing, I do. I get the careful long term pursuit of a 40lb monster. I get the endless weekends, the hasty justifications to the husband or wife, the sacrifices made to bag the ultimate beast. I really do and I never understood why anyone would dislike a particular species of fish for any reason.

This week though, one day in particular, my catches were, 3oz perch, 1/2lb skimmer, carp, carp, carp, carp, carp, bacon sandwich, carp, 10lb+ carp, carp, carp, carp, carp, carp, carp, 2lb bream. Most of the others were similar days. It's just carp after carp. Aside from a matchman, does ANYONE want such a catch on a given day? Neither specimens, nor variety. By the end of it, I wanted to throw myself in and hope for a Great White shark.

To me, that isn't an enjoyable days fishing really. I'm not trying to get match weights, I just want to catch fish. In the 30 years before I restarted, I don't ever, ever, remember this sort of thing happening. It was more like perch, perch, perch, perch, perch, roach, perch, tench, perch, rudd, roach, perch perch, skimmer, perch, skimmer.

I've tried a multitude of different baits over the week. Even double red maggot resulted in....you guessed it, carp. Thats in 2ft of water and it took 2 minutes. Wasn't even a bad fish! Fisheries need to sort out their priorities. Either they are match fisheries, specimen fisheries, or pleasure fisheries. You can't be all things to all people, all of the time.

Forgetting my personal preferences, this can't be good from an ecological perspective, can it?

My friends in the US absolutely hate them, which I never understood, since most of their fishing is generally one or two species in fresh water.

Not all of us hate them. ;)

That’s just the bass propaganda that’s pumped out constantly.

Variety is good, though. :)
 

satinet

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I caught my first carp in 2016 I think. Low double at Boddy Res. Before that I hadn't fished since the 90s and had never caught a carp when I was a kid that I recall. Although I do think commies/stocked waters were starting to come in at that time. Certainly I remember a mate catching one on a pole so it wasn't like ye olden days.

Anyway the reality is that many people just won't fish places where there is no possibility of catching a carp.

The simple fact is carp are the biggest fish in UK waters and people want to catch big fish. Let's be honest even if you are ardently anti carp you'd rather catch a 2lb roach than 2oz one no matter how fin perfect.

I mainly fish commies but sometimes the carp do make it so you don't know what tactics to employ as you will get them silver fishing. My local commie, bishops bowls, you can generally have a nice mixed day catching all sorts. You will catch carp but there are plenty of other you fish you will catch. Suits me ok.
 

Sam Vimes

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You mean like most stillwaters used to be Sam?

John.
Possibly. However, the simple reality these days is that if you don't have either plenty of carp, or pretty big carp for the area, an awful lot of anglers won't give the water a second glance.

If you can rustle up enough people that think differently then you've got the beginnings of a club, syndicate or commercial venture. Based on my own experience of a mixed fishery syndicate, I hope you have better luck persuading non-carpers to put their money where their mouths are.
 

John Step

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You wont like this but here goes.
If you dont want wall to wall carp dont fish commercials.
I cannot believe there is anywhere in the UK where there is no angling club that doesnt have at least a few waters that are not carp dominated.
As stated there are also rivers and canals . Its only water. It just moves sideways, thats all. Start with slow moving ones and gently lay on. Small worms and maggot will catch anything. Plenty of info on youtube.
We all started somewhere. It just takes a bit of Googling and footwork effort. A couple of days exploring will produce results better than turning up with your gear.
 
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