Food for thought ( Pitchfork )

david white

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If as I understand it DNA proof is almost 100% conclusive and Pitchfork was the first person convicted using what is now a go to method in the policing system maybe we ( the tax payers ) ought to be lobbying our MP’s to debate the following
If ( and I’ve taken a reasonable guess ) it cost £1000 p w to confine a prisoner ( and that’s without medical, human rights entitlement or rehabilitation costs ! ) Pitchfork will have cost the tax payers in excess of £1.5m only for him to almost immediately break his parole terms and be return to prison
So I draw the following
a) he’s as guilty as hell with an obvious malfunction in his wiring system
b) prison is cushy so he wanted to go back
c) he felt a greater risk on the ‘ outside ‘

I’m off the opinion some crimes and the offenders don’t deserve tax payers money being thrown at them, it’s a total waste
OR
put another way what else could the £1.5m have been spent on ( it’s an awful lot of guide dogs for the blind for example )
 

Total

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If as I understand it DNA proof is almost 100% conclusive and Pitchfork was the first person convicted using what is now a go to method in the policing system maybe we ( the tax payers ) ought to be lobbying our MP’s to debate the following
If ( and I’ve taken a reasonable guess ) it cost £1000 p w to confine a prisoner ( and that’s without medical, human rights entitlement or rehabilitation costs ! ) Pitchfork will have cost the tax payers in excess of £1.5m only for him to almost immediately break his parole terms and be return to prison
So I draw the following
a) he’s as guilty as hell with an obvious malfunction in his wiring system
b) prison is cushy so he wanted to go back
c) he felt a greater risk on the ‘ outside ‘

I’m off the opinion some crimes and the offenders don’t deserve tax payers money being thrown at them, it’s a total waste
OR
put another way what else could the £1.5m have been spent on ( it’s an awful lot of guide dogs for the blind for example )
Go fishing! ;)(y)
 

62tucker

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If as I understand it DNA proof is almost 100% conclusive and Pitchfork was the first person convicted using what is now a go to method in the policing system maybe we ( the tax payers ) ought to be lobbying our MP’s to debate the following
If ( and I’ve taken a reasonable guess ) it cost £1000 p w to confine a prisoner ( and that’s without medical, human rights entitlement or rehabilitation costs ! ) Pitchfork will have cost the tax payers in excess of £1.5m only for him to almost immediately break his parole terms and be return to prison
So I draw the following
a) he’s as guilty as hell with an obvious malfunction in his wiring system
b) prison is cushy so he wanted to go back
c) he felt a greater risk on the ‘ outside ‘

I’m off the opinion some crimes and the offenders don’t deserve tax payers money being thrown at them, it’s a total waste
OR
put another way what else could the £1.5m have been spent on ( it’s an awful lot of guide dogs for the blind for example )
Hang him
 

david white

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I certainly hope my post hasn’t put the words into your mouth 🤔😉 or I could always tell the truth ! but I was once told “ it’s your own mouth that hangs you ! “ ( rather apt when I think about it )
 

Chervil

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If as I understand it DNA proof is almost 100% conclusive and Pitchfork was the first person convicted using what is now a go to method in the policing system maybe we ( the tax payers ) ought to be lobbying our MP’s to debate the following
If ( and I’ve taken a reasonable guess ) it cost £1000 p w to confine a prisoner ( and that’s without medical, human rights entitlement or rehabilitation costs ! ) Pitchfork will have cost the tax payers in excess of £1.5m only for him to almost immediately break his parole terms and be return to prison
So I draw the following
a) he’s as guilty as hell with an obvious malfunction in his wiring system
b) prison is cushy so he wanted to go back
c) he felt a greater risk on the ‘ outside ‘

I’m off the opinion some crimes and the offenders don’t deserve tax payers money being thrown at them, it’s a total waste
OR
put another way what else could the £1.5m have been spent on ( it’s an awful lot of guide dogs for the blind for example )
Not a bad guess £44,640 per year. Many moons ago when I was in Belize, we were being shown around and, driving past the prison, were informed, 'If you get banged up over here, your family pays your living costs.' Seems like an idea.

 
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