Flood or Ebb

PAB

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Just out of pure interest do you find the rising or ebbing tide best when fishing rivers?
 

ukzero1

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Interesting question, but I don't get to fish tidal waters.
 

banksy

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Doesn't seem to make a of of difference to me, as long as I'm aware of the tide times where I'm fishing.
It's a pity to put in a lot of bait on a rising tide, only to have the tide turn and then you have to build the swim up again.
Or to have a lovely trot down to a feature like an overhanging tree, then finding that you are trotting back to a deserted area full of snags!

It can catch you out as well. Several times I've been fishing a flood tide on the tidal Trent, blissfully unaware of the water
rising around my ankles, flowing round behind me, and carrying my bait boxes and tackle away.
On one memorable occasion, my mate and I were marooned on what became an island at high tide. We hadn't realised that the approach to the pegs was lower than the pegs themselves.

It usually went quiet around the top of the tide, then picked up again as soon as the ebb started.
 

The Runner

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Ebb every time in my experience, less difference on the tidal Trent than others on the few times I fished it but still noticeable.
Don't know if just a coincidence but seems to me that the smaller the tidal river the less chance of it fishing well on the flood (other than for eels and stray flounders, mullet etc..)
 

PAB

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Doesn't seem to make a of of difference to me, as long as I'm aware of the tide times where I'm fishing.
It's a pity to put in a lot of bait on a rising tide, only to have the tide turn and then you have to build the swim up again.
Or to have a lovely trot down to a feature like an overhanging tree, then finding that you are trotting back to a deserted area full of snags!

It can catch you out as well. Several times I've been fishing a flood tide on the tidal Trent, blissfully unaware of the water
rising around my ankles, flowing round behind me, and carrying my bait boxes and tackle away.
On one memorable occasion, my mate and I were marooned on what became an island at high tide. We hadn't realised that the approach to the pegs was lower than the pegs themselves.

It usually went quiet around the top of the tide, then picked up again as soon as the ebb started.
Have a look at Willy Weather App fantastic for tides.
 

rudd

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In an Estuary for salt species - flood, try holding bottom on the Ebb on any East Coast river, you can for about an hour until it starts running.
Freshwater the ebb, food going in its natural direction.
 

rudd

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In an Estuary for salt species - flood, try holding bottom on the Ebb on any East Coast river, you can for about an hour until it starts running.
Freshwater the ebb, food going in its natural direction.
And no salt ingress in the lower layers - which happens on the broads.
 

tipitinmick

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Ebb always. Ive fished the tidal Trent for 40+ years and on average it always fishes best on an ebb.
 

smiffy

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On the Yare,flood is better for Bream and ebb for Roach. It’s not set in stone though as colour has a lot to do with it. The Yare is a little bit strange as the colour is introduced by a flood tide rather than fresh water entering from upstream.
My preference is for a nice,coloured flood tide.
 
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