Float rod to Handle big carp?

David_581

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Firstly i’d like to say what a brilliant site this is. As someone that’s fairly new to fishing it’s been invaluable to me while learning. So many of the videos and articles online are glorified adverts. I always come here to get good honest advice. This is my first post as I don’t seem to be able to find an answer myself and am starting to feel A little lost to be honest with you.
I really hope that I am not posting where I am not allowed to do so as a new member. If so, I am really sorry.

Basically I have been fishing for a few years now. I love to catch carp and tench in my local lakes. I haven’t ventured outside of my area too much.
I have to admit I find sitting waiting for a buzzer to go off very boring. I have a feeder rod and love it. I also have a cheap 6M pole that I enjoy using But when a really big fish takes it I get snapped off. There are some high 20’s where I fish.
I with the float I absolutely love how I can react to bites on the pole and with I could fish like that for big carp with a rod and reel. I recently asked the manager of my local tackle shop if there is a float rod designed for large carp. He said that I need to choose what I want to do. ‘Fish for small carp on a match rod, or fish for big ones with a 2-3lb tc rod on a buzzer’. I felt a bit stupid for asking the question honestly.
However then I stumbled upon a video by John Bailey online where he is doing exactly what I want. BIG carp on a rod and reel. He mentioned that he used a Hardy Marksman Rod to do so. I have had a look online and there are many options for them. They are also very expensive. I see that Korum had a strong float rod for big carp that has now been discontinued. If possible I’d really like some advice from the experts on this site as I am a little lost.

Again a I am sorry if I am posting into the wrong section or am too new here to ask a question.
Thank you all once again for all of the help over the years! I love reading the posts here.

Thanks
Dave
 

Rick123

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I've a really nice old Daiwa spinning rod 9' long is perfect but not designed for carp, but does the job. Or you can buy a rod i have and like to use every now and again. Century Close Quarter rod, a stunning piece of kit, expensive but ideal for margin carp as big as you like?

If you want a dedicated rod for big carp there are loads of older 10 to '11' with nice cork handles. I'd guess 2lb t/c would be ideal with 8 to 10lb lines.

I'd also say do you really need buzzers at all?
 

Rick123

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Dave. Just found Wychwood Riot rods on E-Bay. Ideal you can pick a length and T/C user £100. Great choice buddy?
 

David_581

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I will have a look at those options now. Thank you so much for taking the time to reply to my post. :)
Out of interest what would be the strongest/thickest line you’d use for a hook link that will work and not scare fish in clear water?
Cheers
 

DomCrtr1975

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Not strictly a float rod more of an Avon twin tip, but i use the older version of the 1.75 tc Daiwa Black Widow twin tip.

I use the main Avon tip for floater fishing for carp off the surface (although have used it for float fishing for carp and tench) and the quiver section for tench and barbel

 

BarryS

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I use a Shakespeare 9ft Ugly stick with a controller float.......brilliant light combination that will land almost anything. Very cheap and a great spinning rod when you need one.
 

David_581

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I use a Shakespeare 9ft Ugly stick with a controller float.......brilliant light combination that will land almost anything. Very cheap and a great spinning rod when you need one.
A friend of mine has an ugly stick and it’s incredible. However I was told that a 9ft rod is useless with a float.
I get really confused with the types of rods. Avons etc.
I have a couple of carp rods but they are so stiff.
My Acolyte plus feeder rod is incredible. But obviously I can‘t use a float with that. I looked at the Acolythe Waggler but was told it wasn’t powerful enough for a really big carp. I am a big fan of buying the right kit for the job but with so many options available it’s confusing. I am having a good look at all of the options that have been suggested thank you all very much.
 

david white

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David.581

Whilst there are many suitable rods that spring to mind I will only ever recommend something I’ve owned and used myself
John Wilson Avon quiver rod absolute classic well worth a half hour google ( John Wilson did many videos under the Go Fishing label often used the rod in many of these )
Drennan 12ft 9inch tench or super tench ( there have been more recent versions but I’ve personally used these early rods, in fact I still use the super tench ) don’t let the name put you off they have extreme through action power great carp float rods
 

Rick123

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David. I think you need to go on a bit of a learning's curve and read all you can about fishing in general. You use a hook and like to suit the circumstances you're fishing in. So fish size, snags in the water, many things you simply have to learn. On a typical Avon rod 8lb line would be ideal fo fish up to maybe 20lb in snag free water, but if the carp run to 40lb you would need a heavier rod and line if you get my meaning. What are the average size of fish you catch mostly?
 

Reuben

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David.581

Whilst there are many suitable rods that spring to mind I will only ever recommend something I’ve owned and used myself
John Wilson Avon quiver rod absolute classic well worth a half hour google ( John Wilson did many videos under the Go Fishing label often used the rod in many of these )
Drennan 12ft 9inch tench or super tench ( there have been more recent versions but I’ve personally used these early rods, in fact I still use the super tench ) don’t let the name put you off they have extreme through action power great carp float rods
Totally agree with you. The JW Avon Quiver is a very handy tool. I use it to float fish for carp quite a bit. A pretty good quiver tip rod too imo. Maybe not the lightest of rods on the float but it does the job. The travel version is a permanent resident in the campervan.
 

BarryS

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A friend of mine has an ugly stick and it’s incredible. However I was told that a 9ft rod is useless with a float.
I get really confused with the types of rods. Avons etc.
I have a couple of carp rods but they are so stiff.
My Acolyte plus feeder rod is incredible. But obviously I can‘t use a float with that. I looked at the Acolythe Waggler but was told it wasn’t powerful enough for a really big carp. I am a big fan of buying the right kit for the job but with so many options available it’s confusing. I am having a good look at all of the options that have been suggested thank you all very much.

I have two power float rods...both Diawa....One 11ft.and one 14 ft But when I want to use a controller float for surface fishing the Ugly Stick is my go-to rod.
 

Ken the Pacman

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It is easy to fall into the trap of gearing up to suit the biggest fish in the pond when in reality you can land 20lb carp on a 13 foot light float rod and 3 or 4lb line if you learn how to play fish and have fairly snag free waters.
Heavy duty float rods do exist and they will be rung to prevent the line sticking to the blank where true carp rods are often sparsely rung with big guides.
The heavier you go the more you compromise the tackle towards catching your average sized fish for the venue and reduce the chances of getting any bites at all
 

BarryS

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Ken you said............"The heavier you go the more you compromise the tackle towards catching your average-sized fish for the venue and reduce the chances of getting any bites at all "

Not sure how a rod can reduce the chances of getting any bites at all .....................as long as the rod can deliver your preferred bait to where you want it ....it has done its job......( till you hook a fish and need to land it....its other job. )......But I can't see how a rod by itself can affect your chances of getting a bite.
I reckon could get bites with a float and line tied to a broom handle
 

david white

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Ken you said............"The heavier you go the more you compromise the tackle towards catching your average-sized fish for the venue and reduce the chances of getting any bites at all "

Not sure how a rod can reduce the chances of getting any bites at all .....................as long as the rod can deliver your preferred bait to where you want it ....it has done its job......( till you hook a fish and need to land it....its other job. )......But I can't see how a rod by itself can affect your chances of getting a bite.
I reckon could get bites with a float and line tied to a broom handle

The clue is in the term ‘ the heavier you go ‘ to fish with a heavy balanced rod and tackle on an average fish sized venue you run the risk of fishing too heavy to fool the normal stamp of fish hence less bites
 

David_581

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David. I think you need to go on a bit of a learning's curve and read all you can about fishing in general. You use a hook and like to suit the circumstances you're fishing in. So fish size, snags in the water, many things you simply have to learn. On a typical Avon rod 8lb line would be ideal fo fish up to maybe 20lb in snag free water, but if the carp run to 40lb you would need a heavier rod and line if you get my meaning. What are the average size of fish you catch mostly?

Ok I see your point and your reason for saying so.
Maybe I should explain where I am coming from. My introduction to fishing was on 2 and 3lb TC rods with buzzers. I have a few of these now. I also have a cheap 6M white knuckle pole. I have branched into fishing with a feeder rod using 8 to 10Lb line. I love how responsive The pole float and feeder rod are.
I would say I am proficient in all of these methods within what’s reasonable for the amount of time that I have been fishing. It’s not really about what I usually fish for and catch. I’d say the average fish is about 8lb. I would like to experiment with float fishing for bigger fish as I feel that I can Hook into more fish Using a float as an indicator vs a bite alarm. I feel I am on a Huge learning curve, as I should be at this stage in my fishing. I just want to ensure that the equipment that I use for my intended direction is up to the job. If there wasn’t a rod that can do what I want I would say fair enough. It’s not that I can’t play a fish in open water on 6 or 8lb line. I just like to have all the information possible before I buy anything.
I have found all of Info that you guys have replied with really interesting and helpful. I have a lot of reading to do to research the suggested options.
 

Silverfisher

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Never been lucky enough to catch a 20 but for 10-15lb fish I love the JW Avon quiver with the 1.25tc top for surface fishing. Paired with a 4000 reel with 6-8lb line. In open water with the 8lb option I doubt you’d have many problems with a 20.
 

Ken the Pacman

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To get the best out of any set of tackle not so much reels but rods end tackle and most important the diameter of the line you are using all of which needs to be in keeping with each other.There is little point in using more than around 6lb line for conventional float fishing with a float rod, some pellet waggler rods maybe 8lb then tying a 16s hook on which will be the weakest point in that sort of set up.
The line rating of a rod is only a vague clue to the power or action of a rod at best and is not really something to be bothered about unless you start fishing with 12lb line on a rod with a suggested rating of 4 to 6lb which means the rod is overloaded at full pressure.
If you feel that you need to fish with 10/12lb line you will get less bites for two reasons one of which is the presentation of the bait will be worse as to gain the benefit of the heavier line you also need to use around a size 10 hook and the slightest bit of wind or tow will drag the float all over the place because of the thickness of the line.
Stick to the gear you can get regular bites on then develop the skills to land the bigger fish, a 6lb carp can snap you if you do not give it line so there is no guarantee that the fish you are losing are much bigger,15 to 20lb carp in fisheries exist but rarely in any numbers and are often easier to land than a lively 8 pounder.
 
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John Step

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I have been doing a bit of this style of carping this last couple of years. Great fun. In a snag free lake the fish run to mid doubles but the average is about 9lb.
I fish usualy over the margin shelf with a Daiwa SR match that is rated at 8lb line. 6lb Sensor is very robust. I have given up using fixed spools as the bites are quite violent. I appreciate the clutch should be set light to compensate but I have found I much prefer a pin . The runs off to the deep water are amazing.

With the heavier line I need to use a heavier float to enable casting. I find that apart from the shot at the waggler the only one I use are a string off enough stotz to anchor about 12" on the deck. avoiding drift.

Just lately the carp have wised up to the boilie approach some are using. I have been feeding tiny pellets and stewed wheat in a carpet.
Now my secret(dont tell anyone) is to cram as many grains of stewed wheat as I can on a size 10 strong hook laid amongst the carpet of feed. his camouflages the hook a treat.
Hope this helps.
 
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