Flat float problems seeing bites?

Rick123

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First time out with the flat float yesterday. Had a real problem seeing bites guys. Had the flat float set just under the surface, bulk shot and a long tails, maybe three feet on the bottom, no droppers, as the Trent was slow and low, but the 6 gram float was looked about right. Any thoughts please, crushed maggots and caster every cast but few indications? Thanks all.
 

smiffy

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Too deep. Bait was probably getting done without it even showing on the float. Next time try 6” to a foot overdepth. The bait only needs to be tripping the bottom unless holding back hard.
 

smiffy

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Ahaaaa?. Probably still way overdepth though. Put some droppers on and ease the float through until it starts tripping the bottom. Add another six inches and go from there. Or, plumb up to depth and add 6inches.
Thinking it was probably small fish aswell,being a pain.
 

Rick123

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Take a look at this guys please? I thought the idea was to fish over depth with this rig?
 

smiffy

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The idea is to balance the weight of the float with the flow. Little flow equals 1 -2g load up to 30g+ floats for really wild water. The bulk and tail are normally the same but the float gets heavier as the flow increases. I normally have my bulk 12-18” from the hook meaning I will fish 12-18” overdepth. If there is a need to go more overdepth it’s because the float isn’t really up to the job so to compensate people just keep pushing the float further and further up. This does work but needs the flow to balance things out.
 

JayD

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I agree that 3 ft over depth seems too much, the only time I do that is on a river that's got a decent flow, and hold back hard with an over shotted float.

There's an old rule that covers most types of bait fishing. 'If you are getting bites, and they aren't registering on the float, or getting too many fish swallowing the hook, then move the dropper/tell tale shot closer to the hook.' 'If you are seeing bites, but can't hit them, then move that shot further away from the hook'. Moving the shot gradually an inch or so at a time until you get a result, often having to change several times during a session to match the feeding behaviour of the fish. I've moved my tell tale shot as close as 3ins, and as far as 2ft from the hook, it all depends on how the fish are taking on the day.

John.
 

Rick123

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To be honest, I thought the idea of these floats was to allow you to fish over depth? Clearly I'm not right in that, so it sounds as if 12'' is about right.
 

Rick123

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The idea is to balance the weight of the float with the flow. Little flow equals 1 -2g load up to 30g+ floats for really wild water. The bulk and tail are normally the same but the float gets heavier as the flow increases. I normally have my bulk 12-18” from the hook meaning I will fish 12-18” overdepth. If there is a need to go more overdepth it’s because the float isn’t really up to the job so to compensate people just keep pushing the float further and further up. This does work but needs the flow to balance things out.


Smiffy i get that, but without the bulk being on the bottom with your 12-18'' how far off bottom ii the bulk on that setting please?
 

smiffy

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Smiffy i get that, but without the bulk being on the bottom with your 12-18'' how far off bottom ii the bulk on that setting please?
Some form of float legering is the only time you’d fish with the bulk on the bottom. Otherwise your bulk should always off the bottom with your tell tale shot giving you the presentation and trimming the float. So if my bulk is 12” from the hook I’d be fishing anything from 11” overdepth to a few inches off bottom.
 

Rick123

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Thanks mate yes I do know what F/L is. It was the how much that interested me, thank.
 

Blanks

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I fish a flat float bulked right down foot from bottom and three droppers usually no6's which can be moved to suit. Feed is GB or bait dropper , great method with a bit of colour and fishing worm on the hook.
 

Ken the Pacman

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Flat floats are used to get either static or slow moving presentation when you need to deal with a combination of flow and depth.
The deeper the water and the stronger the flow = bigger floats ...rule of thumb says that a flat float will cope with roughly double that of a conventional float so 2g flat is equivalent to about a 4g conventional float.
Without seeing the peg you were fishing it sounds like the float was too big and the tail below the bulk too long as has already been pointed out but how do you know ?
Simple answer is to plumb the depth then leaving the plummet on add the full length of line from hook to bulk so in your case you would be 3 foot overdepth, drop the rig in slightly downstream of you and watch the float settle on the bulk down to the bristle, if the bristle tips upstream the float is too light if it sits straight its ok but the float may be too heavy and where possible you should always fish with the lightest float that will do the job properly.
If the flow is similar next time you go try a 3g float with a hook length of around 18/20 inches and see if that improves the bite detection you can also overshot the float if you are holding it back same as you can with a stick float.
 

smiffy

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I thought the idea a a flat float was when the river was up, coloured and pushing through a bit.
Yep, you’re right. Flat floats are designed for easing through or holding back hard in flow. Often that coincides with a bit of extra water. Personally I don’t use them until I need 4g or more, I’m happy to use conventional floats below that. I’ll often fish a pole feeder rather than flat float as I have more confidence in where the feed is going.
 
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