Fishing with Glass Fibre

Curlew

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Sorry to disagree but I think glassfibre is inferior in every way to even cheap modern carbon rods.
Which pains me as I have a skein of old fibreglass rods in the attic. And that's where they'll stay !
 

Simon R

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I have a couple of glass rods that I've kept from the 70s - one of which I still occasionally use - the Shakespeare Alpha leger rod 9'6" - beautiful soft action and I use it for skimmers on the swingtip - eliminates hook-pulls.

Currently on a bit of a mission to collect together all the glass / early carbon rods I either used to own or lusted after but couldn't afford as a 14 year old on two quid a week pocket money :p
So far I've suceeded in getting hold of:
Shakespeare Strike 13' - how I ever caught as many fish as I did on this rod is a mystery
Henry Aiken Mistral DeLuxe II 12'9" - sort of bog standard float rod
Shakespeare Alpha 12' - beyond pocket money range - but a very capable rod. The action is a bit soft but I'd happily use this on a stillwater.
Shakespeare Match International 12' - also beyond pocket money range, however infinitely better than the above (which was supposed to replace it) - light, crisp action - courtesy of the spliced tip

Not glass but of a similar vintage is the Mk1 Shakespeare President - 13' of super-stiff carbon fibre - it wasn't around long because basically it was rubbish:p Tried it out the winter before last https://www.maggotdrowning.com/forums/threads/roach-galore-at-renny.217034/

Still looking for my favourite float rod of the ones I actually owned - the Rodrill Yellowhammer - mine got crushed in a house move and remaining examples appear to be about as common as rocking horse poo:cry:

Reel wise I'm looking for a Mitchell 840 (the high speed match) at a reasonable price, the Avon Royal Supreme centrepin and a couple of budget reels - the Daiwa 1050 and Shakespeare Ambidex - the blue / yellow or green one from the late 70s - both early skirted spool designs.

Simon
 
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Jan 3, 2021
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Interesting that glass fibre fly rods are making a comeback...and have been for a while now. Not cheap the Moonshine Rod company selling their rods for nearly $300. They talk about a better "feel" but I wonder if it's just marketing and creating a new trend. can't see them performing much better than the latest carbon tech.

Glass fibre rod is just enjoying old times - too heavy and not as nice s my cheap carbon rod.
 

davylad

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I'm presently in the process of rebuilding a Cono-flex 1.75lb tc carp rod from around the 70's, more for something to do than anything else. I might give it a go now and again when it's ready,
 

R0B

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Nov 17, 2020
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For specimen hunting where they are in the rests for the majority of the time, glass rods can be quite nice. Awful for holding in the hand for trotting etc. - been there, done that, got the wrists like Popeye to prove it.

For fly rods, modern S glass is far better than the old stuff but even this only for shorter, lighter weights, they are really nice. Not for a 9'6" &wt for the reservoir though, just NO.
 

Arry

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Mainly cane for me, although I have a Sealey Black Arrow 12' and a Polystel Alpha 13' Match in glass, both lovely rods... have to disagree with Curlew.... some early carbon offerings were dire... there are any number of tales of rods exploding on the cast... but as with any new material bugs have to be ironed out... now to me carbon is just soulless black stuff with no character... but hey...! each to their own eh...???
 

Deejay8

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Jan 3, 2020
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I have a couple of glass rods that I've kept from the 70s - one of which I still occasionally use - the Shakespeare Alpha leger rod 9'6" - beautiful soft action and I use it for skimmers on the swingtip - eliminates hook-pulls.

Currently on a bit of a mission to collect together all the glass / early carbon rods I either used to own or lusted after but couldn't afford as a 14 year old on two quid a week pocket money :p
So far I've suceeded in getting hold of:
Shakespeare Strike 13' - how I ever caught as many fish as I did on this rod is a mystery
Henry Aiken Mistral DeLuxe II 12'9" - sort of bog standard float rod
Shakespeare Alpha 12' - beyond pocket money range - but a very capable rod. The action is a bit soft but I'd happily use this on a stillwater.
Shakespeare Match International 12' - also beyond pocket money range, however infinitely better than the above (which was supposed to replace it) - light, crisp action - courtesy of the spliced tip

Not glass but of a similar vintage is the Mk1 Shakespeare President - 13' of super-stiff carbon fibre - it wasn't around long because basically it was rubbish:p Tried it out the winter before last https://www.maggotdrowning.com/forums/threads/roach-galore-at-renny.217034/

Still looking for my favourite float rod of the ones I actually owned - the Rodrill Yellowhammer - mine got crushed in a house move and remaining examples appear to be about as common as rocking horse poo:cry:

Reel wise I'm looking for a Mitchell 840 (the high speed match) at a reasonable price, the Avon Royal Supreme centrepin and a couple of budget reels - the Daiwa 1050 and Shakespeare Ambidex - the blue / yellow or green one from the late 70s - both early skirted spool designs.

Simon
The original Shakespeare President has a poor reputation, but the second version which came out in the early 1980s was one of the finest match rods ever made, especially for river fishing. I have one, and it's spliced tip action is wonderful. It took a little while for rod manufacturers to get to grips with carbon, but by the beginning of the 1980s, they had it sussed.
 

Deejay8

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Mainly cane for me, although I have a Sealey Black Arrow 12' and a Polystel Alpha 13' Match in glass, both lovely rods... have to disagree with Curlew.... some early carbon offerings were dire... there are any number of tales of rods exploding on the cast... but as with any new material bugs have to be ironed out... now to me carbon is just soulless black stuff with no character... but hey...! each to their own eh...???
Those Polystel Shakespeare rods are really nice rods.
 
Joined
Jan 3, 2021
Messages
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For specimen hunting where they are in the rests for the majority of the time, glass rods can be quite nice. Awful for holding in the hand for trotting etc. - been there, done that, got the wrists like Popeye to prove it.

For fly rods, modern S glass is far better than the old stuff but even this only for shorter, lighter weights, they are really nice. Not for a 9'6" &wt for the reservoir though, just NO.
Totally agree with that. I probably manage about 30 mins with the old Shakespeare Wonder Rod and then ‘Wonder’ why I’m using it not my new(er) rods. It’s more to do with memories, fortuntunately I have a short memory so 30 mins is enough. :ROFLMAO:
 
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