Fen Drain Rudd Tactics?

Truly

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Dec 26, 2020
Messages
296
Each time I go after the tench and/or bream, I catch a few Rudd. Lovely fish, in pristine condition.

Fishing waggler on the bottom but sometimes get taken by rudd near the surface, if I cast a bit further than intended, across the drain to a lily pad.

I have been thinking of setting up specifically for the Rudd, fishing shallow with punch or flake. No doubt will get taken by lots of small stuff but there are some very nice rudd present too.

I have been thinking of using a small loaded waggler, with very little weight down the line and set at about two feet. Casting distance 25 to 30 foot maximum and stillwater.

I was also wondering what to loose feed to get them feeding and keep them at it? I have never bought a pellet but was musing as to whether there is anything suitable?
What's your thoughts please?
 

smiffy

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 26, 2009
Messages
4,370
Bread flake is my favourite for sorting out the bigger fish but, to be honest, if there’s hoards of them you will get pestered by fish of all sizes. I’d fish an unloaded waggler as loaded can dive bomb the fish sometimes. Feed liquidised if you go the bread route otherwise maggot and caster will catch plenty.
I can’t really think of a bait that will discriminate against small Rudd seeing as they normally take a bait off the surface or in the upper layers. Never done that well with seed otherwise I’d have said give Tares a go👍
 

Deejay8

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 3, 2020
Messages
1,358
You could try using a waggler as a controller rather than a conventional float. Attach the waggler in the normal way, with just enough bulk shot to cast and cock it and then put a float rubber at the top of the float and run the line up the float so it comes off the top of the float. So the line will be held out of the water direct to a floating bait like breadcrust. It's best to watch the crust for a bite, but the float will also move across the water or start to tip sideways as the fish moves off with the bait. It works for any surface feeding fish. You just scale the tackle up for carp and down for rudd or other surface feeding silvers.
 

NoCarpPlease

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 2, 2006
Messages
4,934
Casters, unloaded 2 or 3bb insert waggler, one or two no.10 shot down the line.
Strike gently when fishing up in the water.
Casters will pick out the better fish anyway.
 

smiffy

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 26, 2009
Messages
4,370
I don’t know wether it’s one particular water I used to fish that was solid with Rudd of all sizes, but, the more ragged and see through the maggot was, the better the Rudd seemed to get. The maggot only came into its own once it had caught ten or so fish😂 Anyone else found the same?
I do remember fishing a match on the Cam, so not a million miles away, when a big Rudd topped in front of me so I cast to it with a waggler and caught it, or one of its mates. Scored me a few points that day. About a pound I reckon.
A pound is a big Rudd for me😉
 

Silver fan 82

Regular member
Joined
Sep 2, 2019
Messages
3,627
Bread flake and corn for the bigger fish. Also if you can stay mobile and adopt a roving approach and sight fish for the bigger fish then this can be a good tactic.
A small, foam pellet waggler is a good bet for a float. I know it may seem overkill but they are really buoyant and don't make too much disturbance providing you don't cast directly on top of the fish.
 

Truly

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Dec 26, 2020
Messages
296
You could try using a waggler as a controller rather than a conventional float. Attach the waggler in the normal way, with just enough bulk shot to cast and cock it and then put a float rubber at the top of the float and run the line up the float so it comes off the top of the float. So the line will be held out of the water direct to a floating bait like breadcrust. It's best to watch the crust for a bite, but the float will also move across the water or start to tip sideways as the fish moves off with the bait. It works for any surface feeding fish. You just scale the tackle up for carp and down for rudd or other surface feeding silvers.
That's a new one on me thanks. Will give it a go (y) .
 

Truly

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Dec 26, 2020
Messages
296
Gave it a try today but the Middle Level Commissioners weed cutting boats had been through (n) :(. All the lily pads are now lying in heaps on the banks. Only one small roach and a very small perch with no bites for hours on end.:poop:
A gem of a venue completely knackered for the time being. @Tenacious Sloth and I are just a little bit peed off, however it's an artificially drained landscape and the main drains need constant maintenance, otherwise we would risk getting more water than enough this winter.
Plenty of other spots in the fens though.(y)
 

Dave Spence

MD virtual champion 2020. Golden Pie winner 2018.
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2017
Messages
11,577
Freelined maggot or caster and feed floaters or floating maggots. Deadly and one of the most exciting ways to fish.
 

Truly

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Dec 26, 2020
Messages
296
Been to have a look at the spot where I saw the Rudd last August/September. The lilies are growing well, so should be good for a surface fishing session when the new season opens.:):upthumb:

I think I will try using a float, rigged as a controller, as recommended by @Deejay8 at post #3. I have never tried this method.

Clearly need a light gauge hook for floating crust or similar bait. I was wondering whether it is worth trying to tie a hair-rig on a 14?

Looking through my fly tying kit, I came upon some Drennan #14 dry fly hooks. They are very light gauge with a longer shank. I think I could tie them with 0.09 Reflo and a knotless knot.

Or should I just put a piece of crust or flake on the hook?:unsure:

There are some cracking Rudd in our Fen Drains. Just need to get a few sessions in before the weed cutter boats come along.:rolleyes:
 

squimp

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 28, 2006
Messages
2,691
The specimen boys use super mobile tactics. They go looking for the fish and use floating baits to locate them. They walk miles trying to find the shoals.

I think early morning starts are an advantage too.
 

Total

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 25, 2016
Messages
20,985
The specimen boys use super mobile tactics. They go looking for the fish and use floating baits to locate them. They walk miles trying to find the shoals.

I think early morning starts are an advantage too.
^^ Strange as it may seem, pleasure anglers have been known to use exactly the same tactics....:oops:(y)
 
Top