Feeder in a Loop

PJG

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Am I missing something here? I've looked at the photos - surely the weight of the loaded feeder (especially when cast) would pull the top "sliding" loop downwards???
 

dave brittain 1

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The original double loop rig was as simple as you put a clip on swivel on an loop and tie it off. Pull the loop tight, move the swivel up and tie two small loops so you have what in effect is a short stiff link which you attach your hook length to. The running loop element was usually 2-6 ins long and could be shortened by adding another loop.

For the rig to be self hooking the feeder needs to be relatively heavy usually 20g or more with a short running loop.

The rig in the main has now been superseded by either a short twizzled running rig with a knot that the rig catches against or by simply using a running rig incorporating a rubber float stop which is more versatile as the float/feeder stop can be moved up and down to shorten/lengthen the running loop element, noting the float stop may not be allowed on some commercials which is where the twiddled loop rig comes into it's own.

 

Dave

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Am I missing something here? I've looked at the photos - surely the weight of the loaded feeder (especially when cast) would pull the top "sliding" loop downwards???
It can't as the feeder cannot slide past the double loop knot that the hooklength is attached to.

If the mainline breaks the line simply pulls out of the feeder and leaves the feeder behind.
 

Warden

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Will give this method a try as Dave says there is nothing fixed above the feeder it would just slide off like someone says whether the loop would stop up the line remains to be seen but certainly could be a game changer if the fisheries don't consider it a bolt rig (be it very loose).
 

IanG1

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The Loop method was my rig of choice on the Trent in the 90s. In all in all the years I used it I never had the mainline break above the feeder loop.
Was just about to post the same, I was taught something very similar in the mid to late 80s for fishing the Trent and if you can find a copy of the clean river fishing video series from around that time the Jan Porter feeder fishing on the Warks Avon on the island at Twyford he uses the loop rig as his go to feeder rig.
 

Simon R

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Was just about to post the same, I was taught something very similar in the mid to late 80s for fishing the Trent and if you can find a copy of the clean river fishing video series from around that time the Jan Porter feeder fishing on the Warks Avon on the island at Twyford he uses the loop rig as his go to feeder rig.
This video?



Just about the entire back catalogue is now available

Simon
 

Godber

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I'm sure the original dink rig was a 12"ish loop with a feeder threaded on.
The loop was secured by a fig8 knot and the hook tied directly onto the tag end about 6" from the knot. A bit of a tether rig but that was the standard back then.
 

Simon R

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Godber

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This is what I've always called the Dink-Dink rig - shamelessly copied from Bob Roberts excellent Legering book

1637958679073.png

And if you want to know how to go about constructing it have a read of Bob's instructions taken from his website - including updates on how to make it safer.



Simon
Thats the one Simon, deadly bolt rig for roach.
 

Maesknoll

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Technically, there isn't anything attached to the mainline line above the feeder. Just a loop... which is no more attached to the mainline than the top eye of your rod is.

Am I missing something, it looks like the feeder is in the loop, that would be banned on a few places I fish.
 

Dave

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The feeder is in an open-ended loop. Tie one up but leave the main line unattached, pull the hook, and you'll see how it works. The line just pulls out of the feeder.
 

JLK

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This can be a winner if the weather is cold and the fish shy biting, ideal if you need to make every bite count ...

20211125_205848.jpg

- Tie a double overhand loop knot in a spare bit of line and trim the ends close to the knot.

- Thread this loop up your mainline and then attach a small maggot feeder or bomb

- Tie the end of your mainline to the loop you made earlier using a half blood knot

You should now have your feeder in a sliding loop.

- Set the size of the loop to what you want, 10cm is ideal.

- Nip the end together and tie a double overhand loop knot in it to attach your hooklength to.
Make sure the feeder is on the side of the main loop that goes to your reel, not to the loop you tied earlier, if that makes sense.

- Attach a 15cm hooklength to finish.


20211125_205945.jpg

What you have is the feeder trapped in a loop which restricts its movement when you get a bite, basically anything more than 10cm and the fish should hook itself against the resistance of the feeder.
Should the line break for any reason the feeder will slide off as it would on normal sliding set up.

Try it and see 😉
Just out of interest Dave. Why is the loop that the main line passes through so big?
Was it done like this for the purpose of the rig demonstration as I guess you could make it smaller with no adverse affect to the rig.
 

Dave

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Yes, just tied for the photo, the actual size of it doesn't make any difference to it's effectiveness, just it's presentation.
Too tight a loop however could cause a restriction on the line in a break situation.
 

grey

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Am I missing something, it looks like the feeder is in the loop, that would be banned on a few places I fish.
It's ingenious. It's not in a fixed loop, it's in a free-running lasso: so if the mainline breaks the lasso releases the mainline. There is nothing fixed onto the mainline above the feeder that won't slip off, or prevent the feeder's release in any way that may result in a fish being tethered.

I think it's acceptance depends how commercials wish to interpret their own rules, it is certainly in the spirit of the rules and ultimately, designed to achieve the same aims as the commercial rules do.
 
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