feeder fishing

Reuben

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 22, 2019
Messages
2,831
what is the loop rig mate .
Have a look at the link in post 8 by #NoCarpPlease & read chapter 3, sadly the diagrams aren’t shown. Basically, thread a link swivel onto your main line & tie a loop about 12 to 24” long with a double overhand knot. Then slide the swivel up to the knot & tie another overhand knot creating a loop for the swivel to run 6 to 12”. Then attach your hooklength to the bottom loop. You ensure the bottom loop is longer than your feeder plus whatever link you’re using so it doesn’t hit your hooklength & damage it. The length of the loops is really up to you as long as the length of that bottom loop is protecting your hooklength.
I’m sure someone else will have a better explanation - a diagram would be easier but that’s beyond my capabilities.
 

Lee Richards

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2019
Messages
8,155
As Rueben explained but consider not attaching the hook length loop to loop.
Add a quick change clip,bead etc to the main line end loop and this will enable you to ring the changes length,hook size,bait etc
 

Reuben

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 22, 2019
Messages
2,831
As Rueben explained but consider not attaching the hook length loop to loop.
Add a quick change clip,bead etc to the main line end loop and this will enable you to ring the changes length,hook size,bait etc
You’re right, Lee, but I tend not to. If I need to change my hooklength for any reason I cut it off. Slippery slope them beads - start with one then, before you know it, you find reasons to start adding more....?
 

Lee Richards

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2019
Messages
8,155
But why mate? :)
Feeder fishing on the Severn tomorrow and on the go I will have two hook lengths of different size hooks and pellet,two for maggot/caster and one for worms.
I will probably use all of them throughout the day and the pellet ones will be banded with bait ready to go.
If it's easier to change then you will and by doing so you increase your chances of working for bites. (and hopefully fish)
 

Godber

Priapism! ladies?
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 12, 2006
Messages
10,079
You put a bow in the line after casting to stop the feeder/bomb from being dragged by the current. Cast out, let the feeder hit bottom, the slowly feed out line on a loose clutch until you can feel the feeder has stopped moving. Tighten clutch.
 

bezzer

Regular member
Joined
May 23, 2006
Messages
1,956
I'm by no means an expert when it comes to feeder fishing, but I've been fairly successful on the Severn in the past few seasons.

My rig is pretty basic, a 2oz, 3oz or 4oz feeder, on the line via a swivel, a buffer bead and then a quick change bead. Then a tail of anywhere between 1ft and 6ft.
 

Neil ofthe nene

Doing things differently.
Site Supporter
Joined
May 4, 2009
Messages
22,697
Feeder rigs are like skinning cats - lots of ways to do it. None are wrong, some better than others or more suited to particular situations.

And no, I have never understood the bow in the line idea. To me more line in the current means more pressure to move the feeder. If the feeder is moving, and you don't want it to, use a heavier feeder.

Fishing is simple, people make it complecated.
 

NoCarpPlease

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 2, 2006
Messages
4,203
Neil - I won't attempt to explain the physics of the bow method, I suspect it's to do with the flow dynamics of a liquid over a semi-circular cross section - and how that is affected by the angulation of the cross section to the direction of flow.
But it definitely works!

The idea is not initially to use less weight - but to provide a route to critically balance and thus achieve a self-hooking rig.
But the spin-off benefit of needing less weight to hold helps a lot on big powerful rivers - otherwise we'd be using beachcasters and 8oz feeders all the time!

On the Wye I've fed a bow of up to 15 to 20m of line on occasions.

Edit - another benefit of the bow is that you don't get a "3ft twitch" from Barbel and risk of smashed hooklength!
 
Last edited:

rd115

плак-плак
Site Supporter
Joined
May 30, 2019
Messages
2,320
Is keeping the rod tip high and thus keeping line out of the water a decent alternative? I'm a beginner so hoping to keep it simple.

I'll be fishing 15lb main to 20lb braid hooklink so not too worried about the 3ft twitch.
 

NoCarpPlease

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 2, 2006
Messages
4,203
what river are you fishing rd115?

yes - rod tip high is part of the picture (I use a 15ft feeder rod sometimes for this benefit)
casting out in front or upstream
feeding the bow

15 lbs line sounds like Big Barbel gear rather than feeder fishing line - so others may be better placed to advise.
For someone watching a quivertip like me - the bow is a really simple method on flowing waters like Trent, Severn and Wye.
 

Lee Richards

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2019
Messages
8,155
I am with NCP that the bow is the way to go but on snaggy waters and especially when you need to fish close to them I prefer to go with the heavier approach and not fish the bow.
I am happy to take the risk that a hook fish may take me into the snag but don't like losing lots of tackle due to floating weed,leaf build up etc dislodging the feeder and it going into the snag.

Yes rd115 and that way is how the bow method works to its optimum.
If fishing 90° downstream then I prefer to drop the rod down to nearly horizontal.
 

rd115

плак-плак
Site Supporter
Joined
May 30, 2019
Messages
2,320
what river are you fishing rd115?

yes - rod tip high is part of the picture (I use a 15ft feeder rod sometimes for this benefit)
casting out in front or upstream
feeding the bow

15 lbs line sounds like Big Barbel gear rather than feeder fishing line - so others may be better placed to advise.
For someone watching a quivertip like me - the bow is a really simple method on flowing waters like Trent, Severn and Wye.

It'll be the Trent near Shardlow/Sawley Weir, have a 12ft Greys barbel rod and an 11ft Ninja X continental style feeder rod, need to get some proper Barbel rods really. The greys only has a 90g casting weight.
 

Pompous git

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 2, 2017
Messages
5,283
A bow in the line results in bites being more positive when ledgering in running water, no idea why but it does.
 

Lee Richards

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2019
Messages
8,155
:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
We have told you why, the bite dislodges the weight,sets the hook and hence a more positive bite.
You stick to the sprat catching with your 1/4 pint of maggots PG :p:p
 

ukzero1

Growing old disgracefully.
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 3, 2004
Messages
15,251
It'll be the Trent near Shardlow/Sawley Weir, have a 12ft Greys barbel rod and an 11ft Ninja X continental style feeder rod, need to get some proper Barbel rods really. The greys only has a 90g casting weight.

The Grey's Barbel rods I have can cast a fully loaded 4oz feeder quite a way. Not quite sure of the test curve without digging them out but I think they are 1.75 tc
 

Pompous git

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 2, 2017
Messages
5,283
:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
We have told you why, the bite dislodges the weight,sets the hook and hence a more positive bite.
You stick to the sprat catching with your 1/4 pint of maggots PG :p:p
Listen up mush, I just wish I had the fast flowing rivers of your area near me. I hope you realise just how lucky you are.

If I do fish flowing water {when not using a stick float} I like to leger upstream and wait for drop backs, more or less foolproof.

If you cast across and tighten up when using a leger you will generally get jabs without hooking the culprit. Allow a bow and
bingo, I can`t explain the science but it works.

I don`t know wether this works for puddle pigs or with feeders, I only do proper fishing {happy birthday Ginger}.
 
Top