Feeder fishing, for better or worse....

CarpCatcher86

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Joined
Jun 25, 2018
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1,291
Ive had the same 0.8PE braid on my feeder reels for about the past 4 years. Depends where you’re fishing, but bream and roach fishing on the lakes and reservoirs I fish (and many others i’m certain), abrasion resistance really isn’t a huge requirement like it is for lure fishing - where I’d totally agree with you. The benefits of no stretch and more importantly, more suppleness/easier distance and completely adequate abrasion resistance means braid really has no down side for feeder fishing when it’s allowed. That said, I don’t use it Fishing less than about 25m, just because because bites can almost be tooo positive if anything.
As I said before, the only other thing I don't understand is using a shock leader. I understand the concept of using a mono leader to cushion the force of casting a heavy feeder to avoid breaking the none stretching braid, but then why would you tie a hooklink to the shock leader thus adding another knot to your rig? If I were to use braided mainline for feeder fishing and did decide to use a mono shock leader, personally I would use 12 ish feet of 8lb mono for a shock leader and also make that my hooklink. Or I would do the same with fluorocarbon instead of mono.
 

Ben Field

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Sep 16, 2014
Messages
308
As I said before, the only other thing I don't understand is using a shock leader. I understand the concept of using a mono leader to cushion the force of casting a heavy feeder to avoid breaking the none stretching braid, but then why would you tie a hooklink to the shock leader thus adding another knot to your rig? If I were to use braided mainline for feeder fishing and did decide to use a mono shock leader, personally I would use 12 ish feet of 8lb mono for a shock leader and also make that my hooklink. Or I would do the same with fluorocarbon instead of mono.
A shock leader in sea fishing terms, yes, that’d be the case. Possibly 30’ to ensure you have a few wraps around your reel to take the stresses of casting. Feeder fishing on the whole though is more like lure fishing in that the leader might only be 1m long. With most feeder fishing apart from the most extreme distance (100m+), the leader length can be adjusted to do four things. 1) Give you some stretch so that when a fish is within range you don’t pull so many hooks out due to the lack of stretch in your mainline. 2) to give you a degree of abrasion resistance in the area that needs it - the bit closest to the lake bed/snags/fish. It’s also something to allow a swivel and feeder to run on, since personally I’d hate a swivel running up and down my braid. 3) for looooong distance - which it should be pointed out, most people don’t do much of, myself included - there is the shock absorption and thicker diameter from which to cast. In the olden days, concern lay about braid slicing fingers on the cast. Fishing to 70m with a very short leader, I’ve never had anything like it happen personally. Nor seen anybody else who has. 4) by using a leader and varying material, colour and diameter, you can actually have the line nearest the feeder either more pinned to the bottom, more or less visible, and more or less abrasion resistant too. All on the same braid mainline.

While all the theory screams that we should use as few knots as possible, it’s no different to lure fishing in how it functions. Tie a decent FG knot if you like. Your hooklength would ordinarily be lighter than your braid or your leader (stepping up your braid and leader where necessary), so a knot between two strong lines is going to be much stronger than any knot you can tie in your hooklength. The leader knot is in practise, just “knot” something worth worrying about. There are way too many benefits elsewhere. It’s just a case of not looking at any feeder leader as a “shock” leader at all. It’s more like a lure leader.

For reference I most often use a 0.8PE YGK braid and leaders between about 8lb and 15lb. Fluoro and mono variants.
 
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