Feeder fishing, for better or worse....

Joe C

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In the last few months, I’ve been almost exclusively feeder fishing. I’m a pleasure angler of average ability who mainly fishes commercials, I’ve almost exclusively always fished on the bottom with a waggler, I like to fish for everything that swims and generally find that fishing on the bottom is the best way to do this.

I’ve recently however been experimenting more with feeder fishing.
I find that I’m much happier fishing from a chair rather than a box which I have f suits feeder fishing much better, I've also found that fishing with a feeder makes it much easier to attack different spots around your swim without having to really accurately plumb multiple places.

These reasons twinned with the fact that I’m planning to start fishing rivers, and big natural waters over the next few months mean im going to be mainly feeder fishing for the near future.

I’ve been watching lots of specialist anglers on YouTube and concepts like counting the lead down for depth etc has gone right over my head, does this need to be done on braid?
I tried it today and after it hits the clip I don’t feel anything?
 

Silverfisher

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You'd feel it more with braid but you should still feel it on mono, even if it's just from the line going slack rather than actually feeling a thud. The bottom make up can effect it as well in that you'll feel it more on harder bottoms.

Also as a side note as primarily a river angler I float fish way more than I feeder fish. Feeder comes out on pegs that are too quick or deep to float fish or when range is required. If it's a peg I can effectively float fish I do so as through trial and error over the years I've found float out fishes the feeder on such pegs almost every time. Plus I find float more fun!
 

satinet

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Basically you need to keep contact with the feeder. If you hit the clip and it say bounces back it would not work because you have got slack line.

Imagine if you lowered the feeder to the water (or ground) slowly right in front of you. The rod tip would stay bent under the weight until the feeder hits the bottom. That's what you are looking for. You don't need braid no.
 

squimp

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Braid has almost no stretch so it makes it easier to feel what is happening.

But you can still ‘feel for a drop’ with mono.

Im currently fishing a really weedy water and braid is banned on ‘fishing’ rods. If I cast out a 2oz plus lead and it lands on a tight line (hit a clip or I stop it with my finger on the spool) I can feel it down - and a hard thump means I have hit gravel; a soft indistinct landing means Ive cast into the weed.

Find a swim where you can SEE a gravel bar and then deliberately cast onto the gravel and then next cast off the gravel. That way you can learn to feel the difference.
 

Silver fan 82

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As has been said, keep your line to the feeder or lead tight after casting out. If you keep it tight if your using your feeder rod you should also be able to see the tip straighten when the weight hits bottom. Obviously if your leading around with a heavy lead then using your feeder rod may not be the best option.
 

rudd

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This is worth a read, if only for a giggle 😂 there is an answer at the end.

 

Godber

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Joe, have a look on Youtube at Lee Kerry, Jamie Harrison braid fishing. Two of the better braid anglers, full of tips and advice. Des Schipp is another, his video on natural waters was filmed on my local water and is how l now go about doing things. 👍
 

Jimpanzee

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Joe, have a look on Youtube at Lee Kerry, Jamie Harrison braid fishing. Two of the better braid anglers, full of tips and advice. Des Schipp is another, his video on natural waters was filmed on my local water and is how l now go about doing things. 👍

I’ve just started this, only 30 mins in so far but I’ve picked up some really useful tips already. There are a few tips at the start for counting the depth, working out the lake bed etc.
 

dave brittain 1

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Joe don't over complicate it, although many sing the praises of braid it does come with other problems, in that it also has an ability to cause tangles, bump fish off and also cause breakages because it is very direct. You also need to use it with a shock leader.

Unless you are fishing competitions where bite indication and distance are the main priorities, I would forget braid altogether as it's simply another expense and aggravation you don't need as a pleasure angler.

Counting the lead down can be very useful to find gullies and changes in depth but also bear in mind if the fish are wary it's can be counter productive.

Feeder fishing on lakes and commercials has developed significantly over the years and for many the array of method and pellet feeders can be confusing. My advice for what it's worth to a pleasure angler, would be to stick with a standard method feeder, open end feeder and cage feeder and get to grips with how they work and when to fish each, noting that on some bream venues I'll set up both a standard feeder, (open end or cage), with a 3ft hook length and a method feeder with a 4in hook length. Sometimes changing to the method when you've put a bed of feed down in a standard feeder can put a few fish in the net quickly before changing back to a standard feeder to put a little bit more feed in the peg, particularly if you start getting a lot of indications but no bites, (sometimes shortening the 3ft hook length can also help, however on other occasions you may want to lengthen it).

On rivers learn to fish the bow on the feeder which requires less lead to hold and is far more sensitive than fishing a tight/direct line to the feeder.

With all feeder fishing think about it like float fishing where you may want to up the feed or decrease it depending on bites.

There are plenty of video's on youtube and one I'd recommend in particular is the Matrix Submerged series. I'd also recommend seeing if you can get a copy of Bob Roberts feeder fishing book. I have the original book however for natural venues it is very good. It may not cover recent methods but these are all covered on youtube with the Jamie Hughes and Andy May videos highly recommended for entertainment as well as their superb fishing content.
 

CarpCatcher86

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Two things concerning modern feeder fishing have left me scratching my head. First was a Drennan video featuring Dean Barlow fishing a huge reservoir on the feeder. He described 0.12mm diameter braid as heavy fishing. 0.12mm Acolyte feeder braid is 12lb bs, so the breaking strain could be considered heavy fishing but the diameter certainly is not. 0.12mm is the same diameter as 2lb Maxima Chameleon, which is hardly a low diameter mono as it is.
The other thing I don't understand is casting to a clip. I get the concept, but what do you do if you hook something big that decides to give you the run around? Unless your tackle is way over gunned there is no way you can let a fish run.
 

Silverfisher

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Two things concerning modern feeder fishing have left me scratching my head. First was a Drennan video featuring Dean Barlow fishing a huge reservoir on the feeder. He described 0.12mm diameter braid as heavy fishing. 0.12mm Acolyte feeder braid is 12lb bs, so the breaking strain could be considered heavy fishing but the diameter certainly is not. 0.12mm is the same diameter as 2lb Maxima Chameleon, which is hardly a low diameter mono as it is.
The other thing I don't understand is casting to a clip. I get the concept, but what do you do if you hook something big that decides to give you the run around? Unless your tackle is way over gunned there is no way you can let a fish run.
I guess by heavy he does purely mean the breaking strain. Agree it wouldn’t make sense to mean anything else.

Have to say I’m wary of fishing to a clip as well. I know you get a couple wraps back back when you tighten up which gives you a bit of leeway but it still doesn’t quite sit right with me as something to do as standard. For something like bream that won’t go screaming off it totally makes sense but not sure I’d want to do it for a running fish.
 

Jimpanzee

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Two things concerning modern feeder fishing have left me scratching my head. First was a Drennan video featuring Dean Barlow fishing a huge reservoir on the feeder. He described 0.12mm diameter braid as heavy fishing. 0.12mm Acolyte feeder braid is 12lb bs, so the breaking strain could be considered heavy fishing but the diameter certainly is not. 0.12mm is the same diameter as 2lb Maxima Chameleon, which is hardly a low diameter mono as it is.
The other thing I don't understand is casting to a clip. I get the concept, but what do you do if you hook something big that decides to give you the run around? Unless your tackle is way over gunned there is no way you can let a fish run.
I’ve wondered the same thing regarding clipping up..if a decent sized fish tries to run off then surely you’d be snapped off in the process??
 

CarpCatcher86

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I also don't understand why feeder fishing at 40 50 or 60 meters suddenly requires a braided mainline. Which needs to be backed up with a shock leader depending on the weight of feeder being used. I understand why you use a shock leader, but why would you want to add extra knots to your rig?
As for the distance, carp anglers fish at 100 yards plus on a regular basis using 20-30lb mono instead of braid. I know you are more likely to get gentle bites instead of screaming runs when feeder fishing.
Personally I use 8-12lb mono for feeder fishing which is either 0.25 or 0.32mm in diameter. If I was going to use braid for feeder fishing, just for the abrasion resistence I would be using at least 0.20 or 0.25mm braid, which depending on brand and 4 vs 8 carrier would give you 40-60lb braid.
Obviously way over gunned for any type of feeder fishing. Braid lacks the abrasion resistence which in all honesty is where it falls apart for me.
I do use braid in 30 50 and 60lb bs for fresh water and salt water lure fishing, other than that it's mono all the way.
 

Silverfisher

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I’ve only tried braid coarse fishing wise on rivers and found it showed too much as in the tip was basically constantly moving then I almost saw bites too soon thus picked up the rod too soon and missed bites. But I can definitely see the advantage of fishing at range with braid on Stillwaters with it though as it would cast easier and you’d see the long range gentle bites easier. It personally wouldn’t worry me on the abrasion resistance point as most big stillwaters aren’t I gather exactly snag pits so I’d be pretty happy with 10-15lb braid being enough. It’s not a sort of fishing I could see myself doing enough of to worry about braiding up for though.
 

Dropon

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Two things concerning modern feeder fishing have left me scratching my head. First was a Drennan video featuring Dean Barlow fishing a huge reservoir on the feeder. He described 0.12mm diameter braid as heavy fishing. 0.12mm Acolyte feeder braid is 12lb bs, so the breaking strain could be considered heavy fishing but the diameter certainly is not. 0.12mm is the same diameter as 2lb Maxima Chameleon, which is hardly a low diameter mono as it is.
The other thing I don't understand is casting to a clip. I get the concept, but what do you do if you hook something big that decides to give you the run around? Unless your tackle is way over gunned there is no way you can let a fish run.
Note when the angler casts out he moves the rod back to vertical or more ,so when the feeder lands and rod is placed on rest there will be a few turns of line on the reel.
 

Nunachuk

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With regards to comments about a big fish running when clipped up, there is a way around it. Simply attach your line to the clip with a piece of elastic and mark your line with a coloured line marker. if a big fish runs, the elastic snaps leaving you to play the fish, no longer clipped up. Afterwards you get another piece of elastic, (possibly prepare a few beforehand to save time), cast out and wind back to the marked line and attach new piece of elastic and carry on fishing. Tight lines.
 

CarpCatcher86

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Note when the angler casts out he moves the rod back to vertical or more ,so when the feeder lands and rod is placed on rest there will be a few turns of line on the reel.
I had noticed that yes. But it still doesn't leave much line if something decides to run.
 

CarpCatcher86

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With regards to comments about a big fish running when clipped up, there is a way around it. Simply attach your line to the clip with a piece of elastic and mark your line with a coloured line marker. if a big fish runs, the elastic snaps leaving you to play the fish, no longer clipped up. Afterwards you get another piece of elastic, (possibly prepare a few beforehand to save time), cast out and wind back to the marked line and attach new piece of elastic and carry on fishing. Tight lines.
Kind of like casting to a line clip and tying a sliding stop knot in front of your tip ring when carp fishing.
 

Ben Field

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If I was going to use braid for feeder fishing, just for the abrasion resistence I would be using at least 0.20 or 0.25mm braid, which depending on brand and 4 vs 8 carrier would give you 40-60lb braid.
Obviously way over gunned for any type of feeder fishing. Braid lacks the abrasion resistence which in all honesty is where it falls apart for me.
I do use braid in 30 50 and 60lb bs for fresh water and salt water lure fishing, other than that it's mono all the way.
Ive had the same 0.8PE braid on my feeder reels for about the past 4 years. Depends where you’re fishing, but bream and roach fishing on the lakes and reservoirs I fish (and many others i’m certain), abrasion resistance really isn’t a huge requirement like it is for lure fishing - where I’d totally agree with you. The benefits of no stretch and more importantly, more suppleness/easier distance and completely adequate abrasion resistance means braid really has no down side for feeder fishing when it’s allowed. That said, I don’t use it Fishing less than about 25m, just because because bites can almost be tooo positive if anything.
 
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