Exactly how good - or bad - is car security? (Read this if anyone has a BMW Mini)

Philocalist

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After the local supermarket screwed up an expected delivery this morning I had little choice other than to go in person - it was a big weekly shop that was expected.
Trying to avoid as much hassle as possible, I planned to go later in the day (just after 5pm) when I thought any crowds might have vanished.
Pulled into the (by now, dark) carpark - space right in front of where I wanted to be :) As I got out, I noticed a BMW 'Mini' parked next door - a white converable Cooper, this years model.
Shopping was as painless as I had hoped, heading back to the car, I parked the trolley by the boot, intending to then unlock the car / kill the alarm, as you would. Rounded the corner of my car to be confronted with a young woman, bent over, bum in the air pointing straight at me :D
Now, I'm large. It's dark, in a car park, I'm head to toe in black, including a hoodie with the hood up cos its bloody freezing - if I go down there to try and access my car door, at best I'm going to get a slap as I squeeze past - at worst she's going to have a fit, scream and pass out as she sees me looming over her .... so I hang back.
She straightens up, (still) jumps regardless, but we end up laughing about it - she gets into her car as I go back to my boot and load up - then she appears again at my shoulder looking very frustrated, and more than a bit worried - she'd got into the car, started it up and started to reverse out before realising that there was 'something' a bit different about the interior.

Turns out, HER car - externally identical - was a few spaces along - but her security fob / key - on a car manufactured this year by BMW - had opened up a different vehicle of the same type, disabled the alarm, and allowed her to start the engine and drive off :oops:

The car she had opened subsequently turns out to be driven by a staff member in the shop, who was informed, so it all ended well .... but I wonder how widespread this problem is - it's potentially a major security issue, no??
 

carphauler

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I've read stories of fobs opening other vehicles by mistake but to be able to match the immobiliser code and start the car is very strange and yes a major security flaw.
 

Arfer Mo

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In the late 1970's my Dads small business built a conservatory for a customer. The customer had spent a fair amount of money having a suited set of Chubb locks installed throughout their house prior to the conservatory being built. They didn't want to pay for having the new conservatory outside door made to suit. A Chubb lock was purchased from a local builders merchant. The customer was jokingly told that some strings had been pulled and that the new lock would match in with the suited set. A lot of disbelief followed, the new key was tried in the back door and opened and closed the lock. Chubb had a lot of awkward questions to answer to the customer.
 

OldTaff

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That is a nightmare for both people - sometimes tech is just a bit too clever and stuff like this happens
 

nejohn

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Reminds me of something that happened to me many years ago.... I parked my gold cortina 1600E in a multi story carpark in Sunderland (I know but I had to pick something up from a shop). Did my shopping then returned to my car, it was only after starting to drive off that I thought something was wrong... Mine had a black interior... The one I was driving had a cream interior...!! I put it back but I did reverse it in to the space instead of driving it in, I then locked it with the key and went to the next level up to find my car parked in a similar spot..... I always wondered what the owner of the other car thought when they returned to find the bonnet facing out and not the boot as they left it
 

Markywhizz

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When I was a mechanic in the eighties I worked in a garage that maintained fleet Fords. We had a box of keys with about 20 Ford keys in. If anyone with a Ford locked their keys in their car we could almost always open it with a key from the box and it didn’t usually take long to find one. They were not at all secure in those days. Despite all the stories of security issues with new cars I would much rather have a system like the modern ones any day.
 

nejohn

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Black interior, cream interior
Really
What’s that I smell?it’s not horses, it’s not cows, it must be bull....
Obviously you have not driven a 1960/70's Ford just about anything that would fit in the key slot would open them and start them, add in a very dark old fashioned multi story car park it only took a few seconds to realise. Ford only did 2 colours for the seats for cortina 1600E 's and really it was only the seats that differed everything else was the same. But hey if you think it is bull them obviously it is and I must have been dreaming. The fact that I had 3 1600E's at the time and I could get into all of them with the same key and 2 were gold one with black seats and one with cream seats probably didn't help
 

robert d

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Obviously you have not driven a 1960/70's Ford just about anything that would fit in the key slot would open them and start them, add in a very dark old fashioned multi story car park it only took a few seconds to realise. Ford only did 2 colours for the seats for cortina 1600E 's and really it was only the seats that differed everything else was the same. But hey if you think it is bull them obviously it is and I must have been dreaming. The fact that I had 3 1600E's at the time and I could get into all of them with the same key and 2 were gold one with black seats and one with cream seats probably didn't help
A few fords i owned i could open with a spoon handle ,all be it they were old at the time
 

Dave

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The father of a lad I worked with came out of a supermarket, went into the car park, and got in a Datsun identical to his. It's only when he was sat there waiting for his son did he realise that the bits and bobs in the car weren't his and he was sat in someone elses car :)
 

tonerain

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Back in the 1970's I had a 1600E Cortina.
If my thumbnail hadn't been cut recently I could open the car with it.
 

OldTaff

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May have had a bit of a history back in my yoof with borrowing cars & I hacked off one of my sales directors last summer stupidly proving it - he splurged a ludicrous amount of money on a restored 1985 MG Metro Turbo and I opened it then started it using a Yale door key :rolleyes:

Within an hour he’d gone to Halfords for a crook lock to go on his new pride & joy & we haven’t seen it in the works car park since.
 

Tyecon

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I always fit a hidden kill switch to all my cars or motorbikes that I own at the time either to battery or fuel pump very easy thing to do diy or auto electrician
 

Dave

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The fuel pump was best because the scrotes could start it, drive it, and breakdown in the middle of the road as it 'ran' out of fuel ;)

I had a modified Sierra Xr4x4i with an all singing all dancing immobiliser on, plus a separate alarm, but still put the steering on full lock and removed the steering wheel when leaving it overnight away from home.
It didn't half feel awkward though carrying a steering wheel around with you lol
 

carphauler

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My mate used to remove the steering wheel from his mini 850,the centre nut was always hand tight so he could do so.
 

Barbelcatcher

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Working in semi-secure hospitals, (I'm not talking Broadmoor or Rampton - but not far off) you would get a side ward key, which was individually identified for that door in the key safe, along with about 16 other keys for other doors within that area. These individual keys wouldn't open any other door within that area or indeed within the complex. However, we would have a master key - which normally operates about 50-100 keys under it, so we could access all the doors with 1 key across say 3 ward areas. We would have perhaps 8 - 10 master keys for a hospital. . If a key was lost, it was a simple job, to get a spare cut to work that 1 particular lock. If a Master was lost - all the keys under the master had to be replaced to preserve security.

There was always a Grand Master key - which unlocked all the keys under it, including the masters - for high security areas - if a grandmaster was lost - you where talking £'000's to get all the keys replaced.
 

RedhillPhil

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Reminds me of something that happened to me many years ago.... I parked my gold cortina 1600E in a multi story carpark in Sunderland (I know but I had to pick something up from a shop). Did my shopping then returned to my car, it was only after starting to drive off that I thought something was wrong... Mine had a black interior... The one I was driving had a cream interior...!! I put it back but I did reverse it in to the space instead of driving it in, I then locked it with the key and went to the next level up to find my car parked in a similar spot..... I always wondered what the owner of the other car thought when they returned to find the bonnet facing out and not the boot as they left it

Cortina 1600E. Flash git! :giggle:
 
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