electrians help required

Status
Not open for further replies.

dam

Regular member
Account Locked
Joined
Feb 11, 2011
Messages
2,559
A few years ago we converted our garage into a room, a second lounge/ TV room for my kids, I also have a kitchen worktop all across one end of the room which doubles as my office desk/ work station where I do all my fishing prep ie make rigs up, tie hooks ect.

When we did the conversion we put GU10 spot lights in the room, 4 across the bottom end over the desk then 6 in a square pattern over the sofa / tv end of the room and a further bank of 6 in between, we put the lights on 3 seperate switches so we didn't need to have all the rooms 16 spots on at any one time.

Any way I am having a problem with 2 of the spot lights and its the same ones over and over, the bulbs on these 2 keep failing they have been replaced numerous times, most of the other lights been changed on what i would consider a normal regular basis as and when required, while some of the the othere lamps have been in since the begining.
The problem seems to be with one light over my desk and one light in the central bank these dont seem to last more than a couple of weeks before failing, its come to a head this past week as I but in high lux, low energy versions in the bank over my desk and within 3 days one had blown and at 6 quid a go you can understand my concern.

Sorry for the long winded tale of woe, but my questions are -

is there a problem with the way they may be wired(although originally done by a qualified electrian),

do the GU 10 fittings become worn in someway or even develop a fault/bad earth/loose connection to cause this and changing the fitting would cure it,

is there some kind of spike happening and its hitting these first, as on a couple of occassions when the light has been switched on there has been a pop the lamp has blown and the circuit breaker at the consumer unit has tripped out.

any help would be greatful.
 
Last edited:

totality14

Regular member
Joined
Mar 13, 2005
Messages
2,680
Could be a spike depends how they've been wired. Try not putting a bulb in for a while see if the next one blows if it doesn't then it's probably the unit that has become faulty. I've had them in the past that are faulty from the offset. The cable should be run into a junction box then the lights spurred from this this creates some resistance at the junction therefore stopping some of the force of a power spike.
 

dam

Regular member
Account Locked
Joined
Feb 11, 2011
Messages
2,559
The lights are all run from junction boxes, and a spur to each fitting, I know this because the electrican did the installation before we plaster boarded and skimmed the ceiling, we measured out where holes were going to be cut and placed the wire going to the fitting in the roof insulation roughly above this point, when the ceiling was finished I drilled the 65mm openings and the wire was easily found from the hole ready for the ectrician to connect them.
When the bulbs have blown it has sometimes been a while before we have changed them, and to my knowledge this hasnt had an effect on the next light.

you say some fittings you have had in the past have been faulty from day one, the reason I have never really considered it being a fitting problem until now because they are such a simple unit, have the faulty ones you have had blown bulbs or just not worked, the more i think about it this has happened from the begining the 2 fittings in question have always blown the bulb first,but it just seems to have got worse.
 

Sassenach

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Sep 30, 2005
Messages
682
is there a problem with the way they may be wired(although originally done by a qualified electrian)?

Yes, not with how they are wired as such, but with the connections. My advise would be to check all connections to the circuit.


do the GU 10 fittings become worn in someway or even develop a fault/bad earth/loose connection to cause this and changing the fitting would cure it?

Possible but doubtful.

is there some kind of spike happening and its hitting these first, as on a couple of occassions when the light has been switched on there has been a pop the lamp has blown and the circuit breaker at the consumer unit has tripped out.

You will probably find that the lamp is running extra hot due to loose/poor connections, decreasing its life expectancy. Your consumer unit should trip when a lamp blows, its doing its job. I dont beleive that surges or spikes would cause it, unless this is happening to other properties.


My only other advise is, dont mess about with it unless you understand what you're doing, get somebody in to check it out for you, electricity can kill and cause fires.
 

sparkyjon

Active member
Joined
Aug 13, 2012
Messages
84
ALOT of this is down to cheap lamps have you bought a batch and been changing the same ones, generally a loose connection will be noticed due to the said light flickering alot.. as for wiring it shouldn't be that really as it should all have been tested after the job was complete.

it's funny as we get this alot from customers saying they have had a new light put up and they just keep blowing bulbs there must be something wired up wrong , it isnt wiring is straight forward if you have your neutral and switched live the light will work , any other issues and as been said before it should create a fault and take the breaker out..
 

Maesknoll

Chris
Staff member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 22, 2006
Messages
8,115
Originally posted by totality14

Could be a spike depends how they've been wired. Try not putting a bulb in for a while see if the next one blows if it doesn't then it's probably the unit that has become faulty. I've had them in the past that are faulty from the offset. The cable should be run into a junction box then the lights spurred from this this creates some resistance at the junction therefore stopping some of the force of a power spike.

If a junction box creates enough resistance to smooth out a spike, then there is something very wrong with it.
 

totality14

Regular member
Joined
Mar 13, 2005
Messages
2,680
I didn't say it completely smooths out a spike but it does help. Anywhere the wire has been depressed causes resistance ie. Junctions or if something is placed on the wire.
I reckon it could be and sounds like the unit is faulty/worn therefore would replace loose or bad connections can also cause the problem he's having this could have been caused by changing the bulb.
 

chrishorobin

Regular member
Joined
Aug 13, 2009
Messages
765
Are your fittings fire rated ones ? e.g. totally enclosed, if so you will need the Aluminium reflector type lamps that throw the heat forward, otherwise if they are standard cheapo ones they will blow very quickly as there is not enough air flow around the lamp for the heat to dissipate.
 

dam

Regular member
Account Locked
Joined
Feb 11, 2011
Messages
2,559
Thanks for the help, the lamps i use will have been bought in asda or b&q so i dont know if they are iffy or not, i have had led low engery ones in them that dont create any heat and they have still blown, the latest high effiency low energy one is very bright similar to 50 watt size but only 11 watts and runs at a very low temp- and out of the 4 fitted the same fitting has blown the bulb again.

I am off work tomorrow so i will knock the power off and change over(swap) a good fitting for one of the iffy ones to see if this transfers/stops the problem.
 

Dogsbody

Regular member
Joined
Nov 12, 2009
Messages
1,304
I put two GU10 4 spot fittings in our Kitchen as thats what her indoors wanted.

Both blew the GU10 bulbs constantly from day 1. The were all fitted correctly with hand contact on the front glass. I tried expensive GU10s, cheap GU10s, cheaper GU10s, Cheap LEDs and Expensive LEDs

The LEDs lasted longer but still far to short for their 16.98 price tag.

Eventually swapped 1 of the fittings for a standard rose and fitted a 100w equivalent energy saver, 1 year and still going strong. On a whim I bought 4 GU10 energy savers at the same time 11.00 each. Touch wood these are still going strong in 1 of the original 4 spot fittings.
 

Maesknoll

Chris
Staff member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 22, 2006
Messages
8,115
Originally posted by totality14

I didn't say it completely smooths out a spike but it does help. Anywhere the wire has been depressed causes resistance ie. Junctions or if something is placed on the wire.
I reckon it could be and sounds like the unit is faulty/worn therefore would replace loose or bad connections can also cause the problem he's having this could have been caused by changing the bulb.

It would so small a resistance as to be unmeasurable with a standard multimeter. That's if it was a resistance at all (in real measurable terms) as the brass connectors are a good conductor.

To suggest a junction box can smooth peaks in a supply is misleading those with little or no electrical understanding. By your reasoning so would every switch and socket termination, surely if that were true you'd have to include every termination in your load calculations for cable size / length when designing a circuit.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top