E Scooters, Your Opinion?

Pyffy

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I live in Rushden, Northants and our local authority is one of the trial sites. So far have seen 2 near misses with riders and cars plus a young lady crashing head first into the railings outside our Asda when she couldn't figure out which one was the brake. The cost of the scooters is paid directly to the company providing the scooters. All the info on our local trial is here Voi E-scooter Trial Launches In Rushden, Higham Ferrers and Wellingborough | North Northamptonshire Council - Wellingborough Area
 

Dave Spence

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They have them for rent over here in Nottingham, the kids are playing on them constantly. Obviously, they have sussed how to circumnavigate the rental.

Everything else, nowadays, is smart, why not kids as well🤔🤔🤔
 

roachy

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They are a menace and a disaster waiting to happen.
Over here they are rife, often seen with an adult riding it with his little kid on the front, no protection worn and weaving all over the place.
Just a couple of months ago a guy died after being in a collision with a van (scooter knobheads fault) but still they seem to be getting more and more common.
The police have been stopping people and seizing the scooters now though.
 

RedRidingHood

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I think they're great, They're no more dangerous, Nor a nuisance then kids on bikes and as of late, the amount of kids grouping up on bikes, While pulling wheelies all over the roads are insane right now. Though people are starting to take the pee now by buying big chunky wheeled scoots that go about 30mph bombing about on the roads like fools. The ones made by Xiaoimi, Segway, Kugoo and such are, In my opinion fine. They cap out at I think 16kmh.

I had a tough choice to make, An E-Scoot or an Electric Bike to commute to work, And even though the E-Scoot would've been the better option, Being smaller and more portable I went for the bike (Fiido D1) based on the fact it's 'more' legal, Albeit still 'Illegal' I believe.

The police don't generally care unless you're being a dickhead. Most people tend to stay away from the roads where the police patrol regardless.
 

Chervil

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I think they're great, They're no more dangerous, Nor a nuisance then kids on bikes and as of late, the amount of kids grouping up on bikes, While pulling wheelies all over the roads are insane right now. Though people are starting to take the pee now by buying big chunky wheeled scoots that go about 30mph bombing about on the roads like fools. The ones made by Xiaoimi, Segway, Kugoo and such are, In my opinion fine. They cap out at I think 16kmh.

I had a tough choice to make, An E-Scoot or an Electric Bike to commute to work, And even though the E-Scoot would've been the better option, Being smaller and more portable I went for the bike (Fiido D1) based on the fact it's 'more' legal, Albeit still 'Illegal' I believe.

The police don't generally care unless you're being a dickhead. Most people tend to stay away from the roads where the police patrol regardless.

If your bike has pedals, that can propel it, as well as the motor it is classed as a ‘electrically assisted pedal cycle’ (EAPC). And doesn't need a licence, tax or insurance. However to qualify as an EAPC and must show either: the power output/manufacturer of the motor and either the battery's voltage/maximum speed of the bike. Maximum power is 250 watts and maximum speed 15.5 mph.

Those ones that are just electric scooters with a seat on, with no pedals to propel them are classed as motor cycles/mopeds and normal rules apply.

A lot of people don't seem to realise that any offences they commit on an electric scooter would put point on their licence, so just riding one with no tax, insurance, helmet etc could see someone getting enough points to get disqualified.

 

mickthechippy

23/04/2008 - 25/12/2021
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If your bike has pedals, that can propel it, as well as the motor it is classed as a ‘electrically assisted pedal cycle’ (EAPC). And doesn't need a licence, tax or insurance. However to qualify as an EAPC and must show either: the power output/manufacturer of the motor and either the battery's voltage/maximum speed of the bike. Maximum power is 250 watts and maximum speed 15.5 mph.

Those ones that are just electric scooters with a seat on, with no pedals to propel them are classed as motor cycles/mopeds and normal rules apply.

A lot of people don't seem to realise that any offences they commit on an electric scooter would put point on their licence, so just riding one with no tax, insurance, helmet etc could see someone getting enough points to get disqualified.

Ive been toying with making an offer for a mates vintage Velosolex petrol engined pushbike

Its a normal pushbike, that has a mini two stroke engine placed on the front forks and has a roller running on the front tyre to provide forward assisted motion

Is that a moped or just a pushbike similar to a E bike (in general) and would I need tax, Ins, Mot on that ?

 

Fireblade929

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Ive been toying with making an offer for a mates vintage Velosolex petrol engined pushbike

Its a normal pushbike, that has a mini two stroke engine placed on the front forks and has a roller running on the front tyre to provide forward assisted motion

Is that a moped or just a pushbike similar to a E bike (in general) and would I need tax, Ins, Mot on that ?

 

RMNDIL

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we them for hire by Council, they are set so that they slow right down to walking speed
if there is a lot of foot traffic on pavement
How does that work ? Does it mean they are being used on the pavements ??
 
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