Drop back bites - river roach and chub - HELP?

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Hi all, so today I caught my first ever chub. I'm quite new to river fishing and feeder fishing - I was using a 44g open end feeder with liquidised bread, 3ft (90cm) hooklength with size 14 - 3 white maggots.

First cast, first chub, second cast, roach, a few casts later, a 2nd little chub (please correct me if these aren't chub). But then I couldn't seem to hit bites or tell what were bites, I presume the rod tip generally does bob up and down a little sometimes when you have a bow in the line? Also, in a drop back bite in a slow to medium pace river, should the tip and line go completely slack? I kept getting a little twitch but never what I imagine to be a full drop back bite.

Can someone offer any advice or explain with winter roach and chub, what a drop back bite would look like or when to strike?

Thanks a lot,
Dave
 

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MarkW

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I tend to fish much light feeders than that with a big bow, a piece of flake on a 10 (yes, 10) and get the feeder to move, with the fish hooking themselves. Hoping to have a session doing just that this week and will try to video it - not sure when it'll be on Youtube though..

What you've caught is two dace - not chub - and a roach, and dace are notoriously hard to hit on the feeder but not impossible.
 

OldTaff

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My dad taught me to always use the lightest possible feeder you can get away with and still hold bottom, also shortening up the hook length can create more positive bite indication without spooking the fish.
 
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Thanks Fellas, that sounds like a good idea Mark. I'd definitely like to see the video whenever you get it done. Good luck!

Thanks PG ?

I've attached another image of one of the fish, is he definitely not a small chub ? I thought I'd made my chub start! What a fool.
 

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Thanks very much ? I appreciate that, being rather new to river fishing. When a dropback bite happens, should the line go completely slack and the tip straighten up? Or does the tip just bounce back a little bit?
 

SeanB

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alsur

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Thanks very much ? I appreciate that, being rather new to river fishing. When a dropback bite happens, should the line go completely slack and the tip straighten up? Or does the tip just bounce back a little bit?
A lot depends on flow, if fish doesn't let go the tip will probably carry on vibrating. A drop back bite on a river is when fish has dislodge feeder and initially the tip will go completely slack thats when you should strike. That's the reason you need to use a feeder that is light enough just to hold bottom if the feeder is to heavy you won't get drop back bites.
 

Ken the Pacman

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This time of the year a lot of the small indications will be from leaves or other debris catching your line on the way past.
If you want to catch any number of Roach or Dace on the feeder the best methods are the loop were the feeder runs in a two or three inch loop or the dink dink which is a short hooklength fixed above the feeder that is tied to the end of the line.
Both can be equally deadly on their day so it pays to try both and see what works the best for you but dropbacks normally result in hooked fish with either method.
 

alsur

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This time of the year a lot of the small indications will be from leaves or other debris catching your line on the way past.
If you want to catch any number of Roach or Dace on the feeder the best methods are the loop were the feeder runs in a two or three inch loop or the dink dink which is a short hooklength fixed above the feeder that is tied to the end of the line.
Both can be equally deadly on their day so it pays to try both and see what works the best for you but dropbacks normally result in hooked fish with either method.
Very effective method, I've also used it to good effect for skimmers on lakes, but unfortunately it's banned on some waters it's band on my club waters Rivers and Lakes.
 

Browner

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The quiver tip material has an effect on the type of bite and the way it’s fished. If the tip is carbon then it’s more rigid and ideal for fishing a bow of line and watching for a drop back bite when the feeder or bomb is dislodged by the take. If it’s glass then its softer and usually fished with a slight curve and the bites are pull rounds as the line is more direct to the weight.
Personally, I would use a carbon tip when there is a good flow and glass when there’s less pace.
 
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I tend to fish much light feeders than that with a big bow, a piece of flake on a 10 (yes, 10) and get the feeder to move, with the fish hooking themselves. Hoping to have a session doing just that this week and will try to video it - not sure when it'll be on Youtube though..

What you've caught is two dace - not chub - and a roach, and dace are notoriously hard to hit on the feeder but not impossible.
Did you manage to get a session filmed Mark? If so, how did it go? Cheers
 

davylad

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I wouldn't worry about identifying them brad, I know blokes who've been fishing for donkeys years, and still can't tell the difference between Chub, Dace Ide Roach etc. ;)
 

TimFB

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Altho the purists may scoff at the idea, I found a bobbin incredibly useful when persuading me to ignore all the twitches and bumps when I starting feeder fishing a few years ago. If the bobbin doesn’t move I just sit on my hands until it does. Just make sure your bobbin isn’t too heavy ... a dace or roach needs to move it after all and many are designed for large carp it seems. Obviously before I get slaughtered my advice is rubbish in anything but a mild flow or still water...?
 
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