Drennan "sinking" Float line

Skridlov

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I recently bought spools of this line in 4lb and 6lb versions. The 4lb version more or less does what it says on the spool - providing you give it a bit of assistance - but the 6lb version is no more prone to sinking than any cheap monofil I've ever used. You doesn't always gets what you pays for....
Roy
 

MarkW

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Are you saying you expect it to float and are finding that the 4lb floats and the 6lb doesn't?

Normal nylon monofil only floats due to surface tension as nylon is very slightly denser than water - anyone doubting this should cut a short 2" length of their favourite 'floating' monofil and push it under the surface in a glass of water then let go - it will sink to the bottom. The finer the line the easier it is to get it to float, and one way to encourage a line to float is to treat it with a silicone line spray or line grease such as Mucilin.
 

PearTree

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Is this the one you bought ?

 

RMNDIL

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I suspect it's the 'new' Float Fish although the OP doesn't actually say which line it is.
 

Skridlov

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Hi. To be clear, it's the "Float Fish" line. Supposed to sink a short way beneath the surface. Which the 4lb example does, requiring a bit of rod tip assistance. The 6lb version, as I said, is as prone to floating as anything else among the countless lines I've used.
Given that surface line drift is a perennial, troublesome, effect when fishing still waters, it would be good to find a line that sinks a little more reliably. Could it be that the "feeder" version of these lines, which are also claimed to sink reliably, would actually be more suitable for float fishing? Not that sinking the line has ever been much of a problem to achieve where using feeders is concerned in my experience.
 

RMNDIL

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It's called Float Fish for a reason. Brilliant for helping to keep up on the surface and so especially good for top & bottom float work. Being nylon, as MarkW correctly points out, it will actually sink if allowed and 'pulled' under but is held up by the surface tension very well and especially when new. That's its job. Prolonged use, as was always the case when we used Bayer in the 70's and 80's, results in the line sinking more readily.

I've never, ever heard anyone complain that Float Fish...floats !
 

PearTree

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Hi. To be clear, it's the "Float Fish" line. Supposed to sink a short way beneath the surface. Which the 4lb example does, requiring a bit of rod tip assistance. The 6lb version, as I said, is as prone to floating as anything else among the countless lines I've used.
Given that surface line drift is a perennial, troublesome, effect when fishing still waters, it would be good to find a line that sinks a little more reliably. Could it be that the "feeder" version of these lines, which are also claimed to sink reliably, would actually be more suitable for float fishing? Not that sinking the line has ever been much of a problem to achieve where using feeders is concerned in my experience.
Just apply some washing up liquid.
 

Rick123

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It's a bit of a con this sinking line job, brought about by the sellers. Why several lines have always been good at sinking like Maxima, and Sensor is they are thicker, so heavier, we get conned a bit by the line ratings. The new line out by Preston called feeder line is simply a thick mono line, nothing special. The diameter of the 6lb line is .23 the same diameter in Sensor is .24. Personally unless someone told me it was very limp, and did not twist, I'd rather stick with what I know. All the "New" lines I have tried like Pulse etc are not that special in my view. Sensor is cheap, and reliable so you can change it several times a season if you wish to.
 

RMNDIL

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It's not necessarily a 'con' - depends who you are referring to and which line, what marketing spec etc. However, you CAN make a nylon monofilament which cuts under the surface and sinks more readily - regardless of diameter. Same as you can make a nylon monofilament which wants to 'float' more than some.
 

satinet

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It's not necessarily a 'con' - depends who you are referring to and which line, what marketing spec etc. However, you CAN make a nylon monofilament which cuts under the surface and sinks more readily - regardless of diameter. Same as you can make a nylon monofilament which wants to 'float' more than some.
How?
Monofilament is only nylon or it's not mono.
 

Skridlov

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It's called Float Fish for a reason. Brilliant for helping to keep up on the surface and so especially good for top & bottom float work. Being nylon, as MarkW correctly points out, it will actually sink if allowed and 'pulled' under but is held up by the surface tension very well and especially when new. That's its job. Prolonged use, as was always the case when we used Bayer in the 70's and 80's, results in the line sinking more readily.

I've never, ever heard anyone complain that Float Fish...floats !
In a long lifetime of fishing, I have never encountered a lake fishing situation, dead still water with no wind whatsoever and no drift excepted (which is a vanishingly rare condition), where, when float fishing, floating line is anything but a bl00dy nuisance. Now someone's going to tell me they like having a float dragged about by breezes.
 

RMNDIL

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Make it sink then or use a specific 'sinking' line. It's all Horses For Courses'.
 

Silverfisher

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In a long lifetime of fishing, I have never encountered a lake fishing situation, dead still water with no wind whatsoever and no drift excepted (which is a vanishingly rare condition), where, when float fishing, floating line is anything but a bl00dy nuisance. Now someone's going to tell me they like having a float dragged about by breezes.
Floating line on a lake is good when silvers fishing if you’ve got them going well as you should you get a bite before the float drifts much so the line on the surface makes it easier to strike.
 

glas04s

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Hi Guys, I was doing a bit of research on the 'net and came across this thread which has prompted me to seek your views. I have had exactly the opposite problem with Drennan float line. No difficulty sinking it but it just keeps on sinking to the extent that it will either sink a float fished on the bottom or pull it out of position when fished up in the water. Has anyone else experienced this and is there a remedy?
 

PearTree

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Hi Guys, I was doing a bit of research on the 'net and came across this thread which has prompted me to seek your views. I have had exactly the opposite problem with Drennan float line. No difficulty sinking it but it just keeps on sinking to the extent that it will either sink a float fished on the bottom or pull it out of position when fished up in the water. Has anyone else experienced this and is there a remedy?
Use Maxima (y)
 
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