Do you have a problem with white label tackle?

warrington63

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Some years ago Browning and Shakespeare brought a pole out , I think the Shakespeare one was called the bulldog .
Same pole ,different graphics ,I think the Shakespeare was cheaper as well .
Roger Surgay advertised some of the poles he sold as being made in the same factory as the major brands .
My mates uncle bought an 11 metre one with about 4 topkits .
I looked at it,noticed the sections were the same design as a pole I had,and out of curiosity tried a few on the pole I was selling to a lad at work .The sections were a perfect fit as the same as the topkits. The pole I had was 14.5 metres.
Anyway sold the pole , and told the lad who bought it if he wanted more topkits or spares , buy the pole that Roger Surgay was advertising.
 

Lee Richards

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EX1 Fishing scales
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Hirisi
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NGT
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Fisheagle
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There are a fair few fishing chairs that have the same frames or with subtle tweaks as well.
 

squimp

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You mention Delkim in your original post……

They are an interesting example given that their converted ‘optonics’ took an existing product and made it actually work properly/better. For their sins they (Delkim) got taken to court by the original makers of Optonics (Dellareed). Amazingly Delkim lost and were told to stop selling their product, despite the fact that their actions were promoting sales of the original product.

Del Romang (boss of Delkim) had the last laugh as he went away and designed a new alarm from the ground up. The rest is history and by the way, where are Optonics these days….(apart from being big in the retro tackle market).

Then there is the story about the Korda Krusha…… somebody turned up at a carp show with a table full of blatant copies of the Korda product (the original had allegedly been sourced direct from another industry). A member of the Korda staff was so incensed when he saw this that he found a blunt instrument and went and smashed the lot of them……..
 

DontKillZander

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You mention Delkim in your original post……

They are an interesting example given that their converted ‘optonics’ took an existing product and made it actually work properly/better. For their sins they (Delkim) got taken to court by the original makers of Optonics (Dellareed). Amazingly Delkim lost and were told to stop selling their product, despite the fact that their actions were promoting sales of the original product.

Del Romang (boss of Delkim) had the last laugh as he went away and designed a new alarm from the ground up. The rest is history and by the way, where are Optonics these days….(apart from being big in the retro tackle market).

Then there is the story about the Korda Krusha…… somebody turned up at a carp show with a table full of blatant copies of the Korda product (the original had allegedly been sourced direct from another industry). A member of the Korda staff was so incensed when he saw this that he found a blunt instrument and went and smashed the lot of them……..
I'm not sure if you're just telling an interesting story which came to mind at the mention of Delkim, or if you're trying to make a relevant point (with all due respect)?
I feel like some might be confusing what I actually meant in the OP / may not even be aware of white label fishing products, however @Lee Richards example above with the scales is exactly and precisely what I was talking about in the OP.

There's stealing ideas - that's 1 thing, or even building on exist ideas...
But then there's white label products, something completely different, it's not competitive - it's mutual, 4 different companies sticking their own logo on "literally" the same product, 20 get made by an 1 obscure manufacturer - then each of those 4 companies get 5 of the 20 which were made, all they do is stick their logo on (and in some cases don't even bother doing that! That are just simply named on the listing - but the product itself is unbranded), that's completely different to how Delkim started.
 

Fred Davis

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All the tackle companies are at it you don't expect they manaufacture all the items themselves do you, they purchase abroad in bulk and get there logo put on it simple a tweak here and a tweak there add another £50 on the price and jobs a good un
 

Sam Vimes

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Most tackle brands do not do any manufacturing at all. Most of them are effectively branders/rebranders, repackagers and distributors. That has been the case for decades. A few actually manufacture some things themselves, but it's liable to be core products only.
 

matt

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It happens in a lot of industries these days... my sister used to work for a company which amongst other things manufactured hair dryers...... 2 equal hair dryers come off the production line and one gets a “premium” brand name stamped on it on it with an rrp of £50 and the other a “supermarket” brand name on it with an rrp of £15...... exactly the same product but with a massive retail price difference.

Google Leichi fishing and have a look at their website and it’s blatantly obvious..... they used to have a section which detailed all of their “partners” which has since been removed.....it listed most of the major premium fly fishing brands with the exception of a few plus quite a few coarse fishing brands who used them to manufacture the goods and put their branding on...... it was seriously interesting to see which brands used their services!
 
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Shadrack

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I agree with you on this. It’s so prevalent that it’s impossible to avoid, but it does feel like you’ve been cheated a bit by the company. Especially when their marketing for the product bangs on about how “we designed this from the ground up to be perfect for…”.
 

Lee Richards

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The company may have designed the item but chosen not to brand it as their own first time.
They may have targeted a market where a brand name is familiar and by selling it through a third party ensure sales.
Prove the product success and then rebrand in the OEM's name.
Its common business practice.
 

grey

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I think you might be a little ahead of the curve asking this question.

I doubt few others are currently concerned who and where their purchase was made - as long as it does the job.

But, given the current situation in the world, I expect product-traceability will be the next big 'thing' that we are encouraged to abide by.

Where our money ends up, what it is funding is becoming increasingly relevant social, environmental and political questions.
• Is the product made responsibly?
• Is it sourced responsibly and shipped economically?
• Is our money funding other activities that could damage us?

Some of these questions based on environmental impact have already been applied to food and have dramatically changed our buying habits. People are more aware, and now question why a bit of lettuce that has been shipped from half way around the world. I believe it's only a small step before we apply the same ethos to other goods too.

Once companies twig on there is a distinct marketing advantage promoting where and how a product is made, manufacturing conditions and location will change to suit the demand.

Regarding the particular piece of tackle: I like to know every detail, it gives me confidence in the product and makes it more precious to me. I want to buy products from a manufacturer that can prove to me they champion quality, skill and craftsmanship in their goods. Unfortunately for me, this what we're currently lacking in fishing tackle.

Regarding the manufacturing of the tackle: I would also prefer to know who whipped my guides on and they were treated fairly. I'd like to know I'm not assisting towards wreaking the planet for the sake of owning a cheap unethically produced piece of rubbish. I'd like to have knowledge the rod I've just bought isn't partially funding a nuclear missile pointing my way or at any of our allies!

As consumers, our responsibilities are changing, Ask the question in 5 years time, and you may get a very different response.
 

Lee Richards

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OEM and product traceability has been jn place for years but the controls have been ramping up over the last decade.
One of the areas drawing attention is third party procurement where say VW Germany are not allowed to sell to China so they sell to Botswana.
Botswana then sell to China but the money finds its way back to Germany.
It allows companies to get around trade embargoes, provenance and copy rights.
Botswana then use their money pot to buy arms from Russia.
 
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