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crisoff

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just wondered if theres any joiners or diy aces that can give me a pointer,i,m making a framework out of 2x2,and making a load of lap joints,instead of doing it the traditional way(saw and chisel)can i use a router to do it,and can it be done by being handheld?i have,nt got one,and intend on buying one,and dont know if a bog standard one or a plunge router would be best or what bits?thanks chaps
 

cess monkey

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You could have a right job on doing it by hand with a router. Saw and chisel is so much easier for lap jointing unless you are used to using a router.

All routers will "plunge" so its more a case of what you are prepared to spend and what use you will get out of the tool after this project.
 

big stoo

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imo routers can do the job you want them to, but it's far easier with a saw and chisel. A bog standard router is a plunge router, the plunnge bit is very important for the setting of ogee and round over bits. when doing lapping joints i had a battery powered circular saw and that did the cutting very quickly and could be set at the right depth and then there's very little chiseling to do, just a bit of tidying up. the problem with using a router on this job is that it only takes of about a eighth of an inch with each pass, using a straight cutting bit bit at half an inch diameter its gonna take at least 32 passes per half join. routers are great tools though and well worth getting, from b&q type stores you should be able to get a router and a selection of bits for around 50 notes, it will do the job but won't last for ever, a good one to practice with while you learn what they can do. hope this helps i'm not great at making myself clear in type,
 

Dave

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A Router would be hard work and you'd need to make up a jig of some kind if you wanted accurate cuts. Plus a decent router will set you back a couple of hundred pound, cheap versions tend to be 1/4 drive and not very powerful for constant, accurate, fast use

Doing the initial cuts with a circular saw set at the right depth would save a lot of time and then finishing off with a decent chisel. Make sure you clamp the wood with something like a Workmate or bench Vice though otherwise your cuts could end up on an angle rather than square on

Or if you've got loads to do, beg, steal or borrow a compound mitre saw. Set this at depth, mark up your wood and off you go
Cut the sides to your rebates first then a couple of passes through the middle waste wood. Finish off with a chisel
 

crisoff

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thanks chaps,gonna buy a sliding compound saw,wouldnt be bothered but i,ve got 60 to cut and it wont go to waste,ta once again.
 

Dave

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If you're going to buy one but don't want to go the whole hog buying expensive, try one of these: http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?id=30997&ts=39325

It's Screwfix's own label and comes with a two year guarantee
I use the Erbauer blades in my saw and they're good quality plus I've got a 6kg SDS+ drill of that make which has so far out lasted others I've had and is still going strong
 
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